Difference between pages "Mance Buttram" and "Mandinaba womens' recycling group"

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{{Volunteerinfobox
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== Intro ==
|firstname=Mance
 
|lastname=   Buttram
 
|country=   Eastern_Carribean
 
|yearservicestarted=2003
 
|yearserviceended=      2005
 
|Group=      Eastern Caribbean 70
 
|site=        Calliaqua
 
|program=Youth and Community Development
 
|assignment01=      HIV/AIDS Education
 
}}
 
  
 +
The Mandinaba Womens' Recycling Group is a 14-member association recently started in the small West African village of Mandinaba located in the Western Region of [[The Gambia]]. The village has an estimated population of 2,500. There are eight different ethnic groups, the majority being the Mandinka, Jola and Fula tribes.
  
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Farming is the most common occupation for the village residents. Farmers cultivate crops including groundnuts (peanuts), millet, bananas, mangos and oranges. The village women also do gardening and produce vegetable crops including cabbage, onions, peppers and okra. These crops are then sold at local market and are the main source of income for the women. Employment opportunities for women go little beyond this with the exception of small-scale business endeavors such as soap making, fish pie, and tie/dye making. It was under these circumstances that the recycling group was formed.
  
== '''Peace Corps Eastern Caribbean/St. Vincent and the Grenadines''' ==
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[[Image:Isatouceesay.jpg|left|thumb|300px|Isatou Ceesay]]
  
Mance Buttram served in the Peace Corps of the United States as a Youth/Community
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A Peace Corp volunteer Health and Community extension agent learned that several of the women in the community knew how to crochet but used it to no economic advantage. She then contacted Isatou Ceesay, Project coordinator of the Njau Women Recycling Group working for the Swedish NGO Future in Our Hands. She arranged a meeting and a training for the women of Mandinaba. Concerned with the overwhelming presence of plastic bags in the environment this group decided to use crochet to recycle plastic bags into purses and wallets. Isatou came to Mandinaba for two days and instructed the group of women on how to collect the bags from the environment, wash and dry them and cut them appropriately, and then crochet them into the purses and wallets. The group consists of both young and older women, predominately housewives, each required to pay a membership fee which is put towards a group fund. Meetings occur on the first and last Monday of each month, with every Friday being "clean-up" day where the group chooses a place in the village or surrounding area (i.e. the village market, police station, etc.) to do trash pick-up.
Development Volunteer from May 15, 2003, to May 31, 2005, for a total length of service of two
 
years.
 
  
After a highly competitive application process stressing strong applicant skills, adaptability and
 
cross-cultural sensitivity, PCV Mance Ruttram began Peace Corps rraining on April 2,2003. The
 
intensive six-week training program was conducted at sites in the Caribbean and included
 
orientation to West Indian culture, familiarity with government and ministry operations.
 
familiarity with educational systems, technical skills acquisition in HIV/AIDS and training in
 
customs and Creole lanpuage. Throughout his Peace Corps service, PCV Mance Buttram also
 
participated in various in-service workshops and conferences to further develop his technical and
 
cross-cultural skills.
 
  
PCV Mance Buttram successfully completed training and enrolled as a Peace Corps Volunteer on May
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[[Image:gambiantrashbagproject.jpg|right|thumb|300px|Recycling Group]]
15, 2003. During his first year of service, PCV Mance Buttram was assigned to Emmanuel High School,
 
Kingstown where he was one of 20 faculty members. The school, with and enrollment of 450,
 
offered five grades of study. PCV Buttram reported directly to the school principal, Mr. Asfo
 
Stevens and was responsible for the mandatory Infomation and Computer Technology program
 
for all 96 grade three students. PCV Burtram's duties included curriculum development, daily
 
lesson planning, constructing snd administering exams and evaluating students' perfmance.
 
  
Additionally, PCV Mance Buttram was assigned to the Ministy of Health, HIV/AIDS Unit. This six person
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The group hopes to grow stronger through improvement of their skills and the training of other women. There is currently a waiting list for new members. They plan to resister and become recognized as an official association in The Gambia. They are currently trying to raise money to build a Mandinaba Womens' Recycling Group Skills Center, a place to meet, work and train others. Currently they meet in the village nursery school. Marketing is currently done informally, but as their group grows, they will seek outlets overseas. (See also a short video of interview with Isatou Ceesay.) Want to buy a purse? Check out World Goods (http://www.worldgoodsfairtrade.com/servlet/the-101/recycled-coin-purse-gambia/Detail ). They get their purses from Mandinaba and from Isatou's home village of Njau.
government organization provides counseling to infected people and educational support
 
to communities and schools. In his role at the HIV/AIDS Unit, PCV Mance Buttram assisted in planning
 
and implementing educational promotions, facilitating community workshops and curriculum
 
development.
 
  
'''HIV/AIDS and Wealth Education Activities'''
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== See the video ==
Structured and implemented an HIVIAIDS education and prevention campaign directed
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{{Youtube|wJQhDj_jiRo}}
at a11 new students at the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Community College. The
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The women of Mandinaba, The Gambia, west Africa generate income by crocheting coin purses from strips of recycled plastic bags. To a soundtrack of Baaba Maal (from the CD Missing You (Mi Yeewnii), track: Jamma Jenngii); if you like it, please buy it.)
semester-long prcgrarn involed assessment of students' existing knowledge of the
 
disease, education and its risks and creating and facilitating small group forurns to discuss
 
behavior change, stigma and other sexual health issues.
 
ColIabosated with another PCV to hold HIV/AIDS education and prevention workshops
 
for residents of four rural villages and three secondary schools.
 
Organized a four-part health education seminar covering nutrition, fitness, HIV/AIDS
 
and stress management at the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Community College.
 
  
'''Information and Computer Technology Training Activities'''
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http://www.worldgoodsfairtrade.com/catalog/NJ100full.jpg
Collaborated with two other PCVs and the Royal St. Vincent and the Grenadines Police
 
Force to conduct three introductory computer classes for trainees at the Police Force
 
Academy.
 
Conducted a two-month computer-training program for teachers at the Brighton Village
 
Primary School. The focus of the class was learning to use the computer as an education
 
tool for presenting material, calculating grades, researching information and word
 
processing.
 
Conducted a two-month introductory computer class for 20 parents of the Brighton
 
Village Primary School P.T.A.
 
  
'''Community Development Activities'''
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== Reference ==
Co-hosted "Peace Corps Alive and Well," taIk radio program for one year. The
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Written by Youtube user: [http://www.youtube.com/user/GambiaRising GambiaRising]
program discussed Peace Corps projects, health issues and cornmunity, regional and
 
world news and events.
 
Assisted local teachers at the Calliaqua Primary School with the "Children Against
 
Poverty" summer education program by tutoring children ages 5-10 with reading,
 
writing, math, and art.
 
Taught water safety, life saving and swimming skiIls to children ages 4- 14 as part of
 
the Ministry of Education's summer program.
 
  
[[Category: Description of Service]]
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[[category:Projects]]
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[[category:Women empowered]]
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[[category:The Gambia]]
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[[category:Youtube]]
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[[category:The Gambia projects]]

Revision as of 09:54, 12 May 2008

Intro

The Mandinaba Womens' Recycling Group is a 14-member association recently started in the small West African village of Mandinaba located in the Western Region of The Gambia. The village has an estimated population of 2,500. There are eight different ethnic groups, the majority being the Mandinka, Jola and Fula tribes.

Farming is the most common occupation for the village residents. Farmers cultivate crops including groundnuts (peanuts), millet, bananas, mangos and oranges. The village women also do gardening and produce vegetable crops including cabbage, onions, peppers and okra. These crops are then sold at local market and are the main source of income for the women. Employment opportunities for women go little beyond this with the exception of small-scale business endeavors such as soap making, fish pie, and tie/dye making. It was under these circumstances that the recycling group was formed.

File:Isatouceesay.jpg
Isatou Ceesay

A Peace Corp volunteer Health and Community extension agent learned that several of the women in the community knew how to crochet but used it to no economic advantage. She then contacted Isatou Ceesay, Project coordinator of the Njau Women Recycling Group working for the Swedish NGO Future in Our Hands. She arranged a meeting and a training for the women of Mandinaba. Concerned with the overwhelming presence of plastic bags in the environment this group decided to use crochet to recycle plastic bags into purses and wallets. Isatou came to Mandinaba for two days and instructed the group of women on how to collect the bags from the environment, wash and dry them and cut them appropriately, and then crochet them into the purses and wallets. The group consists of both young and older women, predominately housewives, each required to pay a membership fee which is put towards a group fund. Meetings occur on the first and last Monday of each month, with every Friday being "clean-up" day where the group chooses a place in the village or surrounding area (i.e. the village market, police station, etc.) to do trash pick-up.


The group hopes to grow stronger through improvement of their skills and the training of other women. There is currently a waiting list for new members. They plan to resister and become recognized as an official association in The Gambia. They are currently trying to raise money to build a Mandinaba Womens' Recycling Group Skills Center, a place to meet, work and train others. Currently they meet in the village nursery school. Marketing is currently done informally, but as their group grows, they will seek outlets overseas. (See also a short video of interview with Isatou Ceesay.) Want to buy a purse? Check out World Goods (http://www.worldgoodsfairtrade.com/servlet/the-101/recycled-coin-purse-gambia/Detail ). They get their purses from Mandinaba and from Isatou's home village of Njau.

See the video

wJQhDj_jiRo|250}}

The women of Mandinaba, The Gambia, west Africa generate income by crocheting coin purses from strips of recycled plastic bags. To a soundtrack of Baaba Maal (from the CD Missing You (Mi Yeewnii), track: Jamma Jenngii); if you like it, please buy it.)

http://www.worldgoodsfairtrade.com/catalog/NJ100full.jpg

Reference

Written by Youtube user: GambiaRising