Difference between pages "Packing list for Bolivia" and "The Safety of the Volunteer"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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[[Image:SOV_cover.JPG|thumb|right|Cover page for [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2006.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2006'''] ]]
  
This list has been compiled and reviewed by Volunteers serving in [[Bolivia]] and it reflects their experience and needs.  Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!  You obviously cannot bring everything so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally.  For example, if you are a business sector Volunteer, your attire is probably more formal than if you are an agricultural or water sanitation Volunteer. Plan and pack accordingly.  You can always have things sent to you later. Many items of clothing and other items can be purchased in Bolivia. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Clothes should be sturdy and practical (i.e., easily washable and without need of ironing).  
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'''''The Safety of the Volunteer''''' is an annual report published by the Crime Statistics and Analysis Unit of the Peace Corps Office of Safety and Security. <br>
  
===General Clothing===
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* The most current report is [http://multimedia.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/pdf/policies/volsafety2009.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2009''']
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* You can also view '''[[health care and safety by country]]''', and also
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* [[Inspector_General | Office of Inspector General's]] '''Final Program Evaluation Report: [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/VSSOIGAug08.pdf  Volunteer Safety and Security]'''
  
* A few pairs of pants (khakis, dockers) for work and casual wear
 
* A few pairs of jeans
 
* A few pairs of shorts
 
* Casual skirts and dresses for women
 
* Shirts or blouses
 
* One or two dressier outfits (jacket and tie for men; skirts and blouses or dresses for women); note that many Volunteers report that except for swearing in and few social events, dressier clothes were the least useful things they packed)
 
* Bathing suit
 
* 12 pairs of good-quality cotton underwear
 
* Enough socks to get you started (available in Bolivia)
 
* Jacket or poncho for rain and cool winter days
 
* Heavier jacket
 
* One or two sweaters (available inexpensively in Bolivia)
 
* One or two sweatshirts
 
* Gloves and a wool hat and/or sweatshirts with hoods for cold mornings
 
* Sweatpants
 
* Baseball cap or wide-brimmed hat (the Bolivian sun is fierce!) Shoes
 
* One pair semi-dress shoes (loafers or something similar) for dressy and professional settings (no high heels needed for women)
 
* One pair of tennis shoes
 
* Two pairs of running shoes, if you run (quality sneakers are available in Bolivia)
 
* Hiking boots
 
* Sturdy walking shoes
 
* Flip-flops or shower sandals
 
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items===
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== Mission ==
  
* Good-quality sunglasses (polarized; with UV protection)
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The mission of the Office of Safety and Security is to foster improved communication, coordination, oversight, and accountability for all of the Peace Corps’ safety and security efforts. One of the responsibilities of the Office of Safety and Security is to track all crime events against Volunteers. '''''The Safety of the Volunteer''''' provides summary statistics for the previous calendar year. It also provides information on trends over the previous 10 years within the three Peace Corps regions: the Africa region; the Europe, Mediterranean, and Asia (EMA) region; and the Inter-America and the Pacific (IAP) region.
* Start-up supply of soap, shampoo, shaving cream, sunblock, etc.
 
* Tampons (Peace Corps provides some but if you prefer your own brand bring them.(Many brands are available locally, but are expensive)
 
* Lip balm with UV protection (more provided in you medical kit)
 
* Any particular brands of over-the-counter medicine you prefer including vitamins (Peace Corps issues medicine for most everything but usually has only one brand of each type) and a three-month supply of any prescription drugs
 
* Towels (available in Bolivia)
 
* Contact lens solutions, if you wear contacts (locally available, too)
 
* Disposable razors (available locally)  
 
  
===Miscellaneous===
 
  
* A good Spanish-English dictionary (Note that a 3,000word-and-phrase dictionary is provided in training)
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== Objectives ==
* Sturdy backpack or duffel bag for short trips
 
* Swiss Army knife or Leatherman tool (be sure this is NOT in your carry-on luggage!)
 
* Fanny pack
 
* Money belt or other hidden passport/money carrier
 
* Photos of family and friends
 
* Light, stuffable, and warm sleeping bag (preferably waterproof)
 
* Camping equipment
 
* Flashlight
 
* Camera
 
* Money for your first day or two in-country and for vacation travel
 
* Books to read and exchange
 
* Diary or journal (notebook or bound paper) to maintain a two-year site diary.
 
* Cassettes or CDs to listen to and exchange
 
* Travel water bottle (Nalgene)
 
* Solar shower
 
* Laptop computer and 220-volt adapter
 
* Alarm clock (battery powered)
 
* AM/FM radio
 
  
Note: Among the items you do not necessarily need to bring (because they are available locally or provided by Peace Corps) are: sheets, pots and pans, dishes and utensils, cassette/CD player, blank CDs, batteries, kerosene burner, mosquito net and mosquito travel tent, water filter, and standard first-aid and medical supplies.
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The two-fold objective of this publication is to:
  
[[Category:Bolivia]]
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* Identify and analyze trends in safety and security conditions among Volunteers; and
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* Provide useful observations regarding trends in an effort to maximize the security of Volunteers and staff.
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==Data Source==
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The data used to prepare this report comes from the Crime Incident Reporting Form (CIRF). In 2006, the CIRF replaced the Assault Notification and Surveillance System (ANSS), in use since 1990, and the property crimes sections of the Epidemiologic Surveillance System (ESS), in use since 1993. Both systems were utilized and managed by the Office of Medical Services (OMS) to capture reports of Volunteer safety incidents. They were both manual reporting systems that required posts to complete incident reports and fax them to OMS for database entry.
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The CIRF was developed to transition the crime reporting system from this paper-based system to a more efficient software solution. The CIRF was implemented at the beginning of 2006 as a temporary electronic solution that would begin to streamline and automate the agency’s crime incident reporting process until a more state-of-theart application was completed. The new reporting system, a Smart Client application built upon web services, is due to be released in early 2008.
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When a crime is reported to post by a Volunteer, the information is collected by the Peace Corps country director (CD) or other staff designated by the CD and is electronically submitted to headquarters via the CIRF application. With the advent of the CIRF, the more severe incidents are also categorized as “violent crimes” and the less severe ones as “non-violent crimes.” Incidents labeled as “violent crimes” require notification to the Office of Inspector General (OIG) investigative unit within the first 24 hours. The CIRF collects information on the following incidents:
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* Four types of sexual assault (rape, attempted rape, major sexual assault, and other sexual assault);
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* Six types of physical assault (kidnapping, aggravated assault, major physical assault, death threat, intimidation, and other physical assault);
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* Five types of property crime (robbery, burglary with Volunteer present, burglary without Volunteer present, theft, and vandalism);
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* Five types of death (homicide, suicide, accidental, illness, and indeterminate cause); and
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* The category of unknown, which captures events that do not meet the definitions of the reported incident categories.
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==Past Reports==
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[http://multimedia.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/pdf/policies/volsafety2009.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2009''']<br>
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[http://multimedia.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/pdf/policies/volsafety2008.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2008''']<br>
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[http://multimedia.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/pdf/policies/volsafety2007.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2007''']<br>
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[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2006.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2006''']<br>
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[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2005.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2005''']<br>
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[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2004.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2004''']<br>
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[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2003.pdf The Safety of the Volunteer '''2003''']<br>
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[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/SOV2002.pdf The '''2002''' Annual Report of Volunteer Safety]<br>
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In 2002 the report was entitled 'The 2002 Annual Report of Volunteer Safety'; the current format of the title is 'The Safety of the Volunteer 2006'.
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''(Note: The reports for 2005 and 2004 are currently available on  [http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=pchq.policies.docs Peace Corps' website]. The reports for 2006, 2003, and 2002 were obtained from Peace Corps, by request, using the [http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=pchq.policies.foia Freedom of Information Act]. All reports are in public domain)''
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==See also==
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[[The Health of the Volunteer]]
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[[FOIA 09085|FOIA Request #09-085]]
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[[Category:FOIA Documents]]

Revision as of 23:10, 28 January 2011

The Safety of the Volunteer is an annual report published by the Crime Statistics and Analysis Unit of the Peace Corps Office of Safety and Security.


Mission

The mission of the Office of Safety and Security is to foster improved communication, coordination, oversight, and accountability for all of the Peace Corps’ safety and security efforts. One of the responsibilities of the Office of Safety and Security is to track all crime events against Volunteers. The Safety of the Volunteer provides summary statistics for the previous calendar year. It also provides information on trends over the previous 10 years within the three Peace Corps regions: the Africa region; the Europe, Mediterranean, and Asia (EMA) region; and the Inter-America and the Pacific (IAP) region.


Objectives

The two-fold objective of this publication is to:

  • Identify and analyze trends in safety and security conditions among Volunteers; and
  • Provide useful observations regarding trends in an effort to maximize the security of Volunteers and staff.

Data Source

The data used to prepare this report comes from the Crime Incident Reporting Form (CIRF). In 2006, the CIRF replaced the Assault Notification and Surveillance System (ANSS), in use since 1990, and the property crimes sections of the Epidemiologic Surveillance System (ESS), in use since 1993. Both systems were utilized and managed by the Office of Medical Services (OMS) to capture reports of Volunteer safety incidents. They were both manual reporting systems that required posts to complete incident reports and fax them to OMS for database entry.

The CIRF was developed to transition the crime reporting system from this paper-based system to a more efficient software solution. The CIRF was implemented at the beginning of 2006 as a temporary electronic solution that would begin to streamline and automate the agency’s crime incident reporting process until a more state-of-theart application was completed. The new reporting system, a Smart Client application built upon web services, is due to be released in early 2008.

When a crime is reported to post by a Volunteer, the information is collected by the Peace Corps country director (CD) or other staff designated by the CD and is electronically submitted to headquarters via the CIRF application. With the advent of the CIRF, the more severe incidents are also categorized as “violent crimes” and the less severe ones as “non-violent crimes.” Incidents labeled as “violent crimes” require notification to the Office of Inspector General (OIG) investigative unit within the first 24 hours. The CIRF collects information on the following incidents:

  • Four types of sexual assault (rape, attempted rape, major sexual assault, and other sexual assault);
  • Six types of physical assault (kidnapping, aggravated assault, major physical assault, death threat, intimidation, and other physical assault);
  • Five types of property crime (robbery, burglary with Volunteer present, burglary without Volunteer present, theft, and vandalism);
  • Five types of death (homicide, suicide, accidental, illness, and indeterminate cause); and
  • The category of unknown, which captures events that do not meet the definitions of the reported incident categories.


Past Reports

The Safety of the Volunteer 2009
The Safety of the Volunteer 2008
The Safety of the Volunteer 2007
The Safety of the Volunteer 2006
The Safety of the Volunteer 2005
The Safety of the Volunteer 2004
The Safety of the Volunteer 2003
The 2002 Annual Report of Volunteer Safety


In 2002 the report was entitled 'The 2002 Annual Report of Volunteer Safety'; the current format of the title is 'The Safety of the Volunteer 2006'.

(Note: The reports for 2005 and 2004 are currently available on Peace Corps' website. The reports for 2006, 2003, and 2002 were obtained from Peace Corps, by request, using the Freedom of Information Act. All reports are in public domain)

See also

The Health of the Volunteer

FOIA Request #09-085