Difference between pages "Packing list for Romania" and "Papua New Guinea"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Romania]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Romania if you look long enough to find it.  
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Papua New Guinea occupies the eastern half of New Guinea--the second largest island in the world. The country gained its independence from Australia in 1975. Papua New Guinea currently has a relatively stable democratic system of government. This country of 600 separate islands has a combined landmass of 462,840 square kilometers. Papua New Guinea lies north of Australia and is part of the cultural group known as Melanesia. Originally named “Ilhas dos Papuas”--Island of the Fuzzy Hair--by early Portuguese explorers, the country was later named New Guinea by early Dutch explorers as it reminded them of Guinea in Africa. The climate of Papua New Guinea varies from extremely hot and humid in the lowlands and island provinces to cool in the higher altitude Highland provinces. A third of the country’s 4.2 million people live in the Highlands.
  
When choosing luggage, remember that you will be hauling it in and out of taxis and trains and often lugging it around on foot. It should be durable, flexible, lightweight, and easy to carry. Duffel bags and sturdy backpacks are good choices.  
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The rugged topography of Papua New Guinea has greatly limited the exposure of Papua New Guineans to the outside world and to each other. Many different cultures have evolved due to the isolation created by rugged terrain. There are nearly 800 separate languages in Papua New Guinea. English is the official language, although Tok Pisin--a Pidgin English--has become the commonly spoken language. Although the country is changing fast, the majority of people remain dependent on subsistence agriculture and live in small villages. Many aspects of their daily life follow tradition and the social structure remains intact. The “wantok” system (literally “one talk” or kin speaking the same language) impacts every level of Papua New Guinea culture. Every Papua New Guinean is bound by a set of duties and obligations to their wantok and they receive reciprocal entitlements in return. Members of a wantok can expect to be housed and fed by their kin but are also expected to contribute to their community. Reciprocity is the tenet of Melanesian generosity.
  
Do not bring anything that is so valuable or precious that you would be heartbroken to lose it.  
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The 1998 United Nations Development Program’s Human Development Index ranks Papua New Guinea 129 out of 173 countries. While the country is rich in natural resources, its wealth is shared by few. Development has been hindered by the diversity of languages and cultures and by the isolation that has historically existed among communities in Papua New Guinea.
  
===General Clothing ===
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==A Synopsis of the Peace Corps in Papua New Guinea==
  
* Shorts and T-shirts for relaxing in hot weather
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Peace Corps Volunteers have been serving in Papua New Guinea for 19 years. The first group, consisting of nine Volunteers, worked on two projects: fisheries and rural community development (RCD). Over the years, Volunteers have worked in health, small business development, and youth projects. At the time of the OIG review, there were 56 Volunteers (15 married couples, nine single females, and 17 single males) working in 12 of the 20 provinces in education and rural community development.
* Slacks and jeans and short-sleeved cotton shirts for summer
 
* Wool or flannel shirts, turtlenecks, and sweaters for winter
 
* Heavy socks (wool and cotton) and lightweight cotton socks (socks wear out quickly)
 
* Heavy-duty poncho (if you plan to do any camping)
 
* Warm hats, scarves, and earmuffs
 
* Two or three sets of long underwear
 
* Flannel pajamas (sweatsuits can also double as PJs)
 
* Heavy winter coat or ski jacket and a down vest
 
* All-weather coat (preferably in a dark color)
 
* Swimsuit and goggles (local pools have a lot of chlorine)
 
* Men: Collared shirts (turtlenecks are also appropriate professional wear), a few ties, and at least one jacket or suit to wear to weddings and other celebrations
 
* Women: Two or three professional outfits (one should be fancier for special occasions) Shoes
 
* At least one pair of sturdy, thick-soled walking shoes (for cobblestone streets)
 
* Plastic shower shoes
 
* House slippers
 
* One pair of insulated, waterproof, ice-gripping boots Note: Winter boots as well as dress and casual shoes, sandals, and slippers are readily available in Romania, but they may not have the fit, quality, or style that you prefer; women who wear size 10 or larger may have difficulty finding shoes.  
 
  
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{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
 +
|-
 +
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="5" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
 +
| [[Ag Economics]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Education]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Extension]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Crop Extension]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
 +
| [[Business Advising]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Development]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
 +
| [[Crisis Corps]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="11" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
 +
| [[Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Economics]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
 +
| [[Forestry]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="6" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
 +
| [[Disease Control]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Degreed]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Extension]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Med. Technician]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
 +
| [[Unique Skill]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
 +
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
 +
| [[1975]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="3" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
 +
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Rural Youth Dev.]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
|}
  
 +
==Peace Corps News==
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
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Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
  
* Any favorite nonprescription medical supplies, though the items the Peace Corps supplies are good (i.e., you do not need to bring a two-year supply of aspirin, vitamins, dental floss, insect repellent, or eyedrops).  
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''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22papua+new+guinea%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
* A three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take, to last until we can order your special needs
 
* Two pairs of eyeglasses, if you wear them (replacements can take a long time to arrive from the United States)
 
* Contact lens solution (if you bring contacts)
 
* Hand lotion and body cream
 
* Towels (bath-sized ones are difficult to find locally)
 
* Women: If you have favorite brands of cosmetics like Clinique or Estée Lauder, bring them with you (but they may also be available in larger Romanian cities)
 
  
===Kitchen ===
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<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/pp/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
  
* Good can and bottle opener and corkscrew
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==See also==
* Measuring cups (both metric and nonmetric)
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Papua New Guinea]]
* Potholders
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
* Plastic water carrier for traveling (some types are available locally)
 
* Strong string or twine for use as a clothesline
 
* Rubber gloves for washing clothes by hand
 
* Plastic food containers
 
* Favorite cooking utensils
 
* Basic cookbook
 
* Plastic storage bags
 
* Packaged mixes of your favorite sauces, salad dressings, and soups
 
* Favorite spices (Mexican, Chinese, Indian, and Italian spices can be hard to find and make good gifts)
 
  
===Miscellaneous ===
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==External links==
 +
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/pp.html Peace Corps Journals - Papua New Guinea]
  
* Money belt
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[[Category:Papua New Guinea]] [[Category:The Pacific Islands]]
* Folding umbrella
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[[Category:Country]]
* Camera—35&nbsp;mm compacts are best because they are inconspicuous and travel well, but digital cameras are also good if they are small and you have the appropriate computer equipment
 
* Small, relatively inexpensive tool kit (e.g., Leatherman) 
 
* Good scissors
 
* Duct tape (can be used for many things)
 
* Swiss Army knife (very important to many Volunteers)
 
* Two good flashlights (one small enough to carry in a pocket) and extra batteries
 
* Travel sewing kit
 
* Pictures of home and postcards of common sights in America
 
* U.S. stamps (you can often have letters mailed in the States by people traveling home from Romania)
 
* Games (e.g., Scrabble, Pictionary, chess), Frisbee, volleyball, etc.
 
* Good sleeping bag (compact with a stuff sack and fully unzippable for use as blanket)
 
* Good bedsheets (not fitted ones because you will not know the size of your bed in advance)
 
* Books and materials you might need for your assignment, as described in the Volunteer Assignment Description
 
* Reference books, such as a good grammar book, an English dictionary, and a thesaurus
 
* A few novels to read and trade
 
* Credit/cash cards (be certain they will work in Romania and that you notify your bank you will be out of the country using them)
 
* Shortwave radio (but such radios work with limited success in Romania and may not be worth the bother)
 
* Exercise materials (e.g., exercise tape or jump rope; some sites have gyms, and some Volunteers teach aerobic classes, so bring music and new steps if you have them)
 
* Reliable watch—durable, water-resistant, and inexpensive
 
* Reliable battery-powered alarm clock and back-up batteries
 
* Sunglasses
 
* Small daypack without frame
 
* Tape or CD player and recorder
 
* Cassette tapes or CDs
 
* Retractable tape measure (inch and centimeter)
 
* Pens and pencils
 
* Journal
 
* Calendars
 
* Paper clips and rubber bands
 
* Clothespins
 
* U.S. maps
 
THIS WAS OBVIOUSLY MADE BY A AMERICAN BECAUSE OF MAPS FOR AMERICA!
 
 
 
[[Category:Romania]]
 

Revision as of 19:26, 6 November 2010


Papua New Guinea occupies the eastern half of New Guinea--the second largest island in the world. The country gained its independence from Australia in 1975. Papua New Guinea currently has a relatively stable democratic system of government. This country of 600 separate islands has a combined landmass of 462,840 square kilometers. Papua New Guinea lies north of Australia and is part of the cultural group known as Melanesia. Originally named “Ilhas dos Papuas”--Island of the Fuzzy Hair--by early Portuguese explorers, the country was later named New Guinea by early Dutch explorers as it reminded them of Guinea in Africa. The climate of Papua New Guinea varies from extremely hot and humid in the lowlands and island provinces to cool in the higher altitude Highland provinces. A third of the country’s 4.2 million people live in the Highlands.

The rugged topography of Papua New Guinea has greatly limited the exposure of Papua New Guineans to the outside world and to each other. Many different cultures have evolved due to the isolation created by rugged terrain. There are nearly 800 separate languages in Papua New Guinea. English is the official language, although Tok Pisin--a Pidgin English--has become the commonly spoken language. Although the country is changing fast, the majority of people remain dependent on subsistence agriculture and live in small villages. Many aspects of their daily life follow tradition and the social structure remains intact. The “wantok” system (literally “one talk” or kin speaking the same language) impacts every level of Papua New Guinea culture. Every Papua New Guinean is bound by a set of duties and obligations to their wantok and they receive reciprocal entitlements in return. Members of a wantok can expect to be housed and fed by their kin but are also expected to contribute to their community. Reciprocity is the tenet of Melanesian generosity.

The 1998 United Nations Development Program’s Human Development Index ranks Papua New Guinea 129 out of 173 countries. While the country is rich in natural resources, its wealth is shared by few. Development has been hindered by the diversity of languages and cultures and by the isolation that has historically existed among communities in Papua New Guinea.

A Synopsis of the Peace Corps in Papua New Guinea

Peace Corps Volunteers have been serving in Papua New Guinea for 19 years. The first group, consisting of nine Volunteers, worked on two projects: fisheries and rural community development (RCD). Over the years, Volunteers have worked in health, small business development, and youth projects. At the time of the OIG review, there were 56 Volunteers (15 married couples, nine single females, and 17 single males) working in 12 of the 20 provinces in education and rural community development.

Sector Assignment Beg. Yr End. Yr
Agriculture Ag Economics 1982 1990
Ag Education 1978 1994
Ag Extension 1982 1993
Crop Extension 1983 1985
Fisheries Marine 1981 1983
Business Business Advising 1982 1989
Business Development 1993 1993
Crisis Corps Crisis Corps 1992 1998
Education Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl 1992 1994
English Teacher 1982 1999
English Teacher Trainer 1988 1988
Fisheries Fresh 1983 1983
Home Economics 1978 1987
Phys. Ed/Youth Wk 1984 1984
Prim-Ed/Teach Trn 1990 1990
Secondary-Ed Math 1985 1999
Secondary-Ed Sci. 1988 1999
Special Ed/Gen. 1998 1999
Voc. Trainer 1992 1992
Environment Forestry 1982 1986
Protected Areas Management 1989 1989
Health Disease Control 1979 1987
Envir. and Water Resource 1985 1985
Health Degreed 1982 1993
Health Extension 1985 1993
Hygiene Ed/Sanitation 1987 1988
Med. Technician 1983 1987
Other Unique Skill 1981 1988
UNV United Nations Volunteer 1975 1996
Youth and Community Development Appropriate Tech. 1982 1988
Commun. Serv/Deg. 1984 2000
Rural Youth Dev. 1986 1993

Peace Corps News

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22papua+new+guinea%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Saturday October 1, 2016 )<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/pp/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

See also

External links