Difference between pages "Packing list for Azerbaijan" and "Packing list for Guinea"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
 
{{Packing lists by country}}
  
This list has been compiled by Peace Corps/[[Azerbaijan]] and Volunteers and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Azerbaijan.  
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Guinea]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that everyone has their own priorities. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can also have things sent to you later (although mail is unreliable, and postage from the U.S. to Guinea is expensive). As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that Peace Corps has an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Guinea.  
  
Luggage should be durable, lightweight, and flexible; a duffel bag or a hiking backpack is a good option. When choosing luggage, remember that you will be hauling it in and out of taxis and trains, and often lugging it around on foot.  
+
In general, you should pack enough clothes to get you comfortably through the three months of pre-service training and use the rest of the space to pack the things that are most important to you. You can have clothes custom-made in Guinea at a very reasonable cost, and there are markets in Guinea with used clothing from other countries.  
  
==General Clothing==
+
===General Clothing ===
  
You can buy clothing in Azerbaijan, but much of it is made of synthetic materials and may not meet your taste. You can also have clothes made locally, but bring what you will need until you know where the best tailors are. Variety in clothing is not as important as how it looks and how sturdy it is. Following are some suggestions for what to pack.  
+
For women, appropriate work clothing is a dress, pants or a skirt (dresses and skirts must at least cover your knees, even when sitting). Slips must be worn with anything transparent.  
  
* A good supply of underwear
+
For men, appropriate work clothing is a nice pair of jeans or slacks (especially for teachers), a button-down shirt, and nice-looking shoes. Short-sleeved button-down shirts are acceptable, but we recommend at least one long-sleeved shirt because it does get cold during certain times of the year. All clothes should be clean and in good condition. For teachers, T-shirts with writing and jeans are generally unacceptable for the classroom (and these are available in the local market at cheaper prices than in the U.S.).
* Polypropylene, wool, and cotton socks and glove liners
 
* Good wool hiking socks (that wick moisture and dry quickly); 3-4 pairs recommended
 
* Long underwear of two or three different weights (e.g., wool and silk)
 
* Polyfill outerwear/coat. Some people suggest bringing two—a full-length black wool coat and a down coat. (Informal, sport-type winter coats can be useful and warm, but draw a lot of attention, whereas black pea coats will not. Winters can be quite cold, especially in the north; you may find yourself wearing a jacket, hat, and gloves in the classroom)
 
* Medium-weight jacket for spring/fall.
 
* Woolen or ski-type hats, gloves, and scarves
 
* Bathing suit (for trips to the beach)  
 
  
Note: Keep in mind the only dry cleaning is in Baku. So you’ll be washing everything by hand, but you still need to look professional.
+
===For Men ===
  
You will still be an American when you live here, so if you have a style of dressing, plan on keeping it, just making the modifications necessary in this culture. This means NO exposed midriffs or backs; any sleeveless tops should be VERY modest, NO short skirts, and clothes should not be too tight.
+
* Two to three-week supply of cotton underwear
 +
* A few pairs of athletic socks (most of the time Volunteers wear open-toed shoes with no socks)
 +
* Three nice outfits (business casual, possibly one with a coat and tie) appropriate for teaching, conferences, and meetings
 +
* Two pairs of jeans
 +
* Two pairs of casual pants (can be part of the “three nice outfits”; carpenter-type pants are acceptable)
 +
* Two to four T-shirts (easy to buy locally if you need more during your service) in colors that easily match everything.  
 +
* One or two long-sleeved shirts
 +
* Three or four pairs of shorts
 +
* One sweatshirt, sweater, or flannel shirt
 +
* Swimsuit
 +
* Five or more bandannas (for dusty taxi rides)
 +
* A light raincoat
  
==For Women==
+
===For Women===
  
* An assortment of winter and summer clothing: skirts and blouses, dresses, knit tops, dressy and casual slacks, and jeans; skirts and dresses should be full or mid-calf length
+
* Two to three-week supply of cotton underwear
* 2-3 sweaters or dressy sweatshirts
+
* Five to eight bras, including a few sports bras (good bras are unavailable locally)
* 2-3 cardigans (good for layering)  
+
* A few pairs of socks (Volunteers typically wear open-toed shoes with no socks)
* One good outfit for formal events
+
* Three nice outfits appropriate for teaching, conferences, and meetings
* Some comfortable “house” clothes; sweatpants, etc.
+
* Two or three casual long dresses (cotton is best; sleeveless is ok, but spaghetti straps are not)
* Slips (cotton is recommended)  
+
* Two or three casual long skirts (that cover your knees, even when sitting)
* Leggings, tights, and stockings (good-quality ones may be hard to find locally)
+
* One or more pairs of jeans or pants (agroforestry Volunteers tend to wear pants more than skirts, while teachers wear skirts)
* Shorts (for safety reasons, to be worn only at home or while jogging early in the morning) 4
+
* Two to four cotton shirts (can be bought in Guinea)
 +
* Two or three short-sleeved, button-down or polo-type collared shirts (especially important for teachers)  
 +
* One sweater, sweatshirt, or flannel shirt
 +
* Two swimsuits (hard to buy in Guinea)  
 +
* A pair of long shorts if you plan to participate in sports
 +
* Hats or caps for sun protection
 +
* Five or more bandannas (for dusty taxi rides)  
  
==For Men==
+
===Shoes===
  
* An assortment of winter and summer clothing: khakis, casual dress pants, jeans, and long-sleeved button-down shirts (dark-colored clothing will look clean longer than light-colored clothing)
+
* Two pairs of nice shoes for teaching or dressing up (nice sandals with no heels are also acceptable)
* At least one sport coat.
+
* One pair of sneakers and/or light, waterproof hiking boots (especially useful for natural resource management Volunteers)
* 2-3 dress shirts and ties.
+
* One pair of running/walking shoes  
* Shorts (because shorts are considered even more inappropriate for men than for women, to be worn only at home or while jogging early in the morning)  
+
* One pair of sturdy sandals (e.g., Chacos or Tevas) (Note that Peace Corps Volunteers receive a 50 percent discount from Chacos; if you prefer to wait and order them after you arrive, an order form will be made available)  
Shoes
+
* One pair of comfortable flip-flops to wear around the house and in the shower (note that you can buy all sorts of plastic shoes in Guinea)
* Professional shoes that are comfortable for walking
 
* Tennis shoes or running shoes (very difficult to find here)
 
* Warm, waterproof boots for winter
 
* Hiking shoes (if you like to hike)  
 
* Well-made fleece/winter slippers.
 
  
==Other==
 
  
* Any favorite over-the-counter medical supplies. (those provided by the Peace Corps are generic ones) Peace Corps does not provide nasal spray or cold medicine, both of which are great.  Bring a couple doses of AM and PM.
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
* A three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take, to give the Peace Corps ample time to order your special needs
+
(all basic toiletries are available in country, but if you are partial to a certain brand/type, please bring plenty of it and definitely bring enough to get through the first three months of training)  
* At least two pairs of eyeglasses, if you wear them, since replacements can take several months to arrive from the United States (contact lens supplies are not available in Azerbaijan and are not supplied by the Peace Corps)
 
*      While Peace Corps discourages contact lenses, wearing them is quite feasible in Azerbaijan.  Bring a few bottles of solution with you (including a couple compact ones for traveling in-country) or prepare to have some sent to you, as solution is very expensive (around $15 a bottle) in Baku.
 
* Towels (of good-quality; absorbent cotton); Volunteers also recommend “quick-dry” towels.
 
* Jewelry and makeup, if you like to wear them (Azerbaijani women in towns wear both)
 
* Hair-coloring products, if you use them (U.S. brands are not available locally) Kitchen
 
* Good can opener
 
*      Vegetable Peeler
 
*      Kitchen knife (they can be purchased here, but become dull really quickly)
 
* Favorite spices (they may be difficult to find, especially in winter.  Many are available in Baku, but can be expensive.)
 
* Favorite cooking supplies (pots and pans can be found in Azerbaijan)
 
*      Quality hot pad / oven mitt
 
* Basic cookbook (Peace Corps will also provide you with a cookbook)
 
* An assortment of plastic storage bags (zip lock bags, a couple large American sized garbage bags) Miscellaneous
 
* Reliable watch (durable, water-resistant, and inexpensive)
 
* Travel alarm clock (battery-operated is best)
 
* Sunglasses
 
* Sturdy work gloves, if you like to garden or work outdoors
 
* Small day pack without frame (great for shopping or carrying books or work materials)
 
* Camera (compact ones are best, since they are inconspicuous and travel well); film and photo processing is available locally
 
* 110/220 transformers, if you bring 110-volt appliances (though a lot of appliances can stand both voltages, such as computers, camera batter chargers, etc.)
 
* Flashlight and batteries; head-lamp (very useful)
 
*      MP3 Player
 
*      Portable, battery powered speakers
 
*      Flash Drive (the bigger the better so you can swap movies/music with other PCVS)
 
* One or two sets of sheets (because you do not know the size of your bed, double flats are most useful)
 
* Small, inexpensive tool kit
 
* Swiss army knife (very important to many Volunteers)
 
* Sewing kit
 
*      Duct Tape
 
* Clothing patterns, if you plan to sew by hand
 
* Pictures of home for yourself and to share with friends and students
 
* U.S. postage stamps (people traveling home can sometimes hand-carry your mail)
 
* U.S. and world maps, to use as teaching aids or wall hangings
 
* Inexpensive gifts (toys, costume jewelry, perfume, magazines, books, pencils, key chains, etc.)
 
* Any equipment for hobbies
 
* Games (e.g., Scrabble, chess, Trivial Pursuit, Pictionary)
 
* Sports equipment (e.g., bat, baseball, and glove, football, Frisbee, hacky sack, etc.)
 
* Liquid soap for washing clothes by hand (the availability of dry cleaning is unpredictable.  Unless you have an item that specifically needs liquid soap, you can get powdered soap anywhere.  All PCVS use powdered detergent)
 
* Down or synthetic sleeping bag, preferably compactable, rated for minus 10 to minus 20 degrees Fahrenhei.  Also consider a fleece liner (Peace Corps will issue you a “monster” sleeping bag for winter.)  
 
*      Sleeping pad for visiting other PCVS
 
* Journal, diary, or schedule book
 
* Small, retractable tape measure
 
*      A notebook computer with DVD player.  PCVs use both Mac and PC.  There is an Apple store in Baku but it is unreliable.  If you have a Macbook, be sure to get the USB modem that allows you to use dial-up.  PCs can be fixed easily and cheaply in Baku and there is a ton of pirated software available.  Consider getting a small external hard drive as well.
 
  
[[Category:Azerbaijan]]
+
* two to four toothbrushes
 +
* At least two tubes of toothpaste
 +
* Mouthwash with fluoride
 +
* Vitamins
 +
* Face wash; face scrub or mask
 +
* Moisturizers, lotions
 +
* Shampoo, conditioner, and soap
 +
* Brush and/or comb
 +
* Razor blades (enough for your normal shaving routine)
 +
* Some makeup
 +
* Nail polish and remover
 +
* Tweezers
 +
* Sunscreen (this is included in your medical kit)
 +
* Travel toothbrush and soap holders
 +
* Nail clippers
 +
* Pummel stone
 +
* Travel towel
 +
* Feminine hygiene products
 +
* Small bottles of gel hand sanitizer
 +
 
 +
===Kitchen===
 +
 
 +
* Spatula
 +
* Good-quality can opener
 +
* One or two good-quality kitchen knives (paring knife, chef knife, serrated knife)
 +
* Swiss Army-type knife or Leatherman-type tool (remember to pack in checked luggage)
 +
* Garlic press 
 +
* Sturdy water bottle, maybe two; (e.g., Nalgene)
 +
* Vegetable peeler
 +
* Plastic food storage containers
 +
* Ziploc type plastic bags (some large, some small)
 +
 
 +
===Food ===
 +
 
 +
To make the transition from your diet to rice and sauce easier, here is a list of recommended snacks and condiments to bring.
 +
 
 +
* Snack bars (cereal, nutrition, energy, etc.)
 +
* Trail mix/dried fruit
 +
* Your favorite sugary snack (gum, candy, chocolate that won't melt)
 +
* Powdered drink mixes
 +
* A good source of protein (beef jerky, tuna, tofu)
 +
* Tea
 +
* Macaroni and cheese (boxed)
 +
* Any spices you particularly enjoy (many spices are available in-country) Miscellaneous
 +
 
 +
===Office and Other===
 +
* Peel-and-seal letters, small padded package envelopes, and U.S. stamps (travelers to the U.S. are frequently willing to hand-carry small envelopes).
 +
* Some pens and pencils
 +
* Frisbee, volleyball, football, etc.
 +
* Playing cards
 +
* Photos from home
 +
* Journal
 +
* Watch (waterproof)
 +
* Travel alarm clock
 +
* Calendar/planner
 +
* Post-it notes
 +
* Coloring books and crayons
 +
* Art supplies (e.g., markers, colored pencils, glue, glitter, construction paper, sketch books)
 +
* Simple calculator (solar-powered is best)
 +
* Tape player, Walkman, iPod, mp3 player, or CD player with mini-speakers (most music sold in Guinea is on cassettes)
 +
* Tape recorder to record messages and sounds of your new life for friends at home
 +
* Your favorite music and blank tapes (you can buy 60minute blank tapes in Guinea)
 +
* Shortwave radio (best are digital or wind-up type [no batteries]; cheap models are available in-country)
 +
* Camera and film (locally available film costs about $1.50 a roll, but quality varies; most local film developing is of poor quality) Note that it may be difficult to download a digital camera on a regular basis, so be sure to bring an extra memory card (or a card with lots of memory) and appropriate batteries for your camera(s)
 +
* Good-quality small flashlight and/or headlamp with extra bulbs (wind-up [no batteries] models are useful)
 +
* Small alarm clock (essential for teachers)
 +
* Batteries for your electronics and camera (batteries from the U.S. last longer; you might also consider bringing a solar battery re-charger as electricity may be nonexistent depending on your site)
 +
* Personal pictures/photos
 +
* A good book or two (there is also a supply at all regional Peace Corps facilities)
 +
* Calculator (for teachers)
 +
* Musical instrument (if you play one)
 +
* Tape (duct and scotch types) 
 +
* Tent, sleeping bag, hammock, and travel mosquito net (a regular mosquito net is provided by Peace Corps for your use)
 +
* Good-quality sunglasses
 +
* A few things that will make you feel happy or luxurious (like foot or face scrubs)
 +
* Pillow (pillows are sold locally, but the quality varies)
 +
* Sewing kit
 +
* Earplugs (if you are a light sleeper)
 +
* Credit cards/some extra money (for vacation travel)
 +
* Something that reminds you of home
 +
* Something that makes you happy
 +
 
 +
===Packing It All===
 +
 
 +
* Hard suitcase/large duffel bag (w/wheels if possible)
 +
* Camping backpack
 +
* School/day pack
 +
* Good-size purse
 +
* Money belt
 +
* Luggage locks/combination locks
 +
 
 +
===A Few Notes ===
 +
 
 +
* Check all electronics you plan to bring and be sure to bring spare batteries
 +
* The Peace Corps/Guinea Volunteer libraries are pretty good; you don't need to bring enough books to read for two years.
 +
* Only bring a large supply of toiletries if you are really particular about something, otherwise, you can find everything you need in-country. Do bring enough for your first three months though. 
 +
* Limit clothes. Really. You'll probably wear lots of locally made clothing. Clothes are inexpensive in Guinea, and there is a large selection of Goodwill clothing available, including a variety of T-shirts.
 +
* Photos are sensitive to the elements, so choose the ones you bring carefully; make copies or don't bring any you don't want to have ruined or lost. Likewise, it isn't advisable to bring anything you are not willing to lose or have broken. Leave your most precious possessions items at home.
 +
* Don't buy too much, only items you really like. What you don't wear in the U.S. you probably wouldn't wear here.
 +
* You probably won't wear closed-toe shoes often here, or the type of clothes required to teach in the States, but a clean, neat appearance is essential.
 +
* Lastly, don't stress! Have Fun! You'll probably pack some crazy stuff you won't use while you are here, but that's ok—everyone does!
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Guinea]]

Revision as of 23:44, 12 March 2009


Packing List for [[{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]

Packing Lists by Country

These lists has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]] based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]
[[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}}|}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}|}}.svg|50px|none]]

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category:{{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Guinea| |5}}]]

This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Guinea and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that everyone has their own priorities. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can also have things sent to you later (although mail is unreliable, and postage from the U.S. to Guinea is expensive). As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that Peace Corps has an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Guinea.

In general, you should pack enough clothes to get you comfortably through the three months of pre-service training and use the rest of the space to pack the things that are most important to you. You can have clothes custom-made in Guinea at a very reasonable cost, and there are markets in Guinea with used clothing from other countries.

General Clothing

For women, appropriate work clothing is a dress, pants or a skirt (dresses and skirts must at least cover your knees, even when sitting). Slips must be worn with anything transparent.

For men, appropriate work clothing is a nice pair of jeans or slacks (especially for teachers), a button-down shirt, and nice-looking shoes. Short-sleeved button-down shirts are acceptable, but we recommend at least one long-sleeved shirt because it does get cold during certain times of the year. All clothes should be clean and in good condition. For teachers, T-shirts with writing and jeans are generally unacceptable for the classroom (and these are available in the local market at cheaper prices than in the U.S.).

For Men

  • Two to three-week supply of cotton underwear
  • A few pairs of athletic socks (most of the time Volunteers wear open-toed shoes with no socks)
  • Three nice outfits (business casual, possibly one with a coat and tie) appropriate for teaching, conferences, and meetings
  • Two pairs of jeans
  • Two pairs of casual pants (can be part of the “three nice outfits”; carpenter-type pants are acceptable)
  • Two to four T-shirts (easy to buy locally if you need more during your service) in colors that easily match everything.
  • One or two long-sleeved shirts
  • Three or four pairs of shorts
  • One sweatshirt, sweater, or flannel shirt
  • Swimsuit
  • Five or more bandannas (for dusty taxi rides)
  • A light raincoat

For Women

  • Two to three-week supply of cotton underwear
  • Five to eight bras, including a few sports bras (good bras are unavailable locally)
  • A few pairs of socks (Volunteers typically wear open-toed shoes with no socks)
  • Three nice outfits appropriate for teaching, conferences, and meetings
  • Two or three casual long dresses (cotton is best; sleeveless is ok, but spaghetti straps are not)
  • Two or three casual long skirts (that cover your knees, even when sitting)
  • One or more pairs of jeans or pants (agroforestry Volunteers tend to wear pants more than skirts, while teachers wear skirts)
  • Two to four cotton shirts (can be bought in Guinea)
  • Two or three short-sleeved, button-down or polo-type collared shirts (especially important for teachers)
  • One sweater, sweatshirt, or flannel shirt
  • Two swimsuits (hard to buy in Guinea)
  • A pair of long shorts if you plan to participate in sports
  • Hats or caps for sun protection
  • Five or more bandannas (for dusty taxi rides)

Shoes

  • Two pairs of nice shoes for teaching or dressing up (nice sandals with no heels are also acceptable)
  • One pair of sneakers and/or light, waterproof hiking boots (especially useful for natural resource management Volunteers)
  • One pair of running/walking shoes
  • One pair of sturdy sandals (e.g., Chacos or Tevas) (Note that Peace Corps Volunteers receive a 50 percent discount from Chacos; if you prefer to wait and order them after you arrive, an order form will be made available)
  • One pair of comfortable flip-flops to wear around the house and in the shower (note that you can buy all sorts of plastic shoes in Guinea)


Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

(all basic toiletries are available in country, but if you are partial to a certain brand/type, please bring plenty of it and definitely bring enough to get through the first three months of training)

  • two to four toothbrushes
  • At least two tubes of toothpaste
  • Mouthwash with fluoride
  • Vitamins
  • Face wash; face scrub or mask
  • Moisturizers, lotions
  • Shampoo, conditioner, and soap
  • Brush and/or comb
  • Razor blades (enough for your normal shaving routine)
  • Some makeup
  • Nail polish and remover
  • Tweezers
  • Sunscreen (this is included in your medical kit)
  • Travel toothbrush and soap holders
  • Nail clippers
  • Pummel stone
  • Travel towel
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Small bottles of gel hand sanitizer

Kitchen

  • Spatula
  • Good-quality can opener
  • One or two good-quality kitchen knives (paring knife, chef knife, serrated knife)
  • Swiss Army-type knife or Leatherman-type tool (remember to pack in checked luggage)
  • Garlic press
  • Sturdy water bottle, maybe two; (e.g., Nalgene)
  • Vegetable peeler
  • Plastic food storage containers
  • Ziploc type plastic bags (some large, some small)

Food

To make the transition from your diet to rice and sauce easier, here is a list of recommended snacks and condiments to bring.

  • Snack bars (cereal, nutrition, energy, etc.)
  • Trail mix/dried fruit
  • Your favorite sugary snack (gum, candy, chocolate that won't melt)
  • Powdered drink mixes
  • A good source of protein (beef jerky, tuna, tofu)
  • Tea
  • Macaroni and cheese (boxed)
  • Any spices you particularly enjoy (many spices are available in-country) Miscellaneous

Office and Other

  • Peel-and-seal letters, small padded package envelopes, and U.S. stamps (travelers to the U.S. are frequently willing to hand-carry small envelopes).
  • Some pens and pencils
  • Frisbee, volleyball, football, etc.
  • Playing cards
  • Photos from home
  • Journal
  • Watch (waterproof)
  • Travel alarm clock
  • Calendar/planner
  • Post-it notes
  • Coloring books and crayons
  • Art supplies (e.g., markers, colored pencils, glue, glitter, construction paper, sketch books)
  • Simple calculator (solar-powered is best)
  • Tape player, Walkman, iPod, mp3 player, or CD player with mini-speakers (most music sold in Guinea is on cassettes)
  • Tape recorder to record messages and sounds of your new life for friends at home
  • Your favorite music and blank tapes (you can buy 60minute blank tapes in Guinea)
  • Shortwave radio (best are digital or wind-up type [no batteries]; cheap models are available in-country)
  • Camera and film (locally available film costs about $1.50 a roll, but quality varies; most local film developing is of poor quality) Note that it may be difficult to download a digital camera on a regular basis, so be sure to bring an extra memory card (or a card with lots of memory) and appropriate batteries for your camera(s)
  • Good-quality small flashlight and/or headlamp with extra bulbs (wind-up [no batteries] models are useful)
  • Small alarm clock (essential for teachers)
  • Batteries for your electronics and camera (batteries from the U.S. last longer; you might also consider bringing a solar battery re-charger as electricity may be nonexistent depending on your site)
  • Personal pictures/photos
  • A good book or two (there is also a supply at all regional Peace Corps facilities)
  • Calculator (for teachers)
  • Musical instrument (if you play one)
  • Tape (duct and scotch types)
  • Tent, sleeping bag, hammock, and travel mosquito net (a regular mosquito net is provided by Peace Corps for your use)
  • Good-quality sunglasses
  • A few things that will make you feel happy or luxurious (like foot or face scrubs)
  • Pillow (pillows are sold locally, but the quality varies)
  • Sewing kit
  • Earplugs (if you are a light sleeper)
  • Credit cards/some extra money (for vacation travel)
  • Something that reminds you of home
  • Something that makes you happy

Packing It All

  • Hard suitcase/large duffel bag (w/wheels if possible)
  • Camping backpack
  • School/day pack
  • Good-size purse
  • Money belt
  • Luggage locks/combination locks

A Few Notes

  • Check all electronics you plan to bring and be sure to bring spare batteries
  • The Peace Corps/Guinea Volunteer libraries are pretty good; you don't need to bring enough books to read for two years.
  • Only bring a large supply of toiletries if you are really particular about something, otherwise, you can find everything you need in-country. Do bring enough for your first three months though.
  • Limit clothes. Really. You'll probably wear lots of locally made clothing. Clothes are inexpensive in Guinea, and there is a large selection of Goodwill clothing available, including a variety of T-shirts.
  • Photos are sensitive to the elements, so choose the ones you bring carefully; make copies or don't bring any you don't want to have ruined or lost. Likewise, it isn't advisable to bring anything you are not willing to lose or have broken. Leave your most precious possessions items at home.
  • Don't buy too much, only items you really like. What you don't wear in the U.S. you probably wouldn't wear here.
  • You probably won't wear closed-toe shoes often here, or the type of clothes required to teach in the States, but a clean, neat appearance is essential.
  • Lastly, don't stress! Have Fun! You'll probably pack some crazy stuff you won't use while you are here, but that's ok—everyone does!