Difference between pages "Honduras" and "Puzey Act"

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*http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/File:Puzey_Peace_Corps_Reform_Legislation_2011.pdf
|Countryname = Honduras
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S. 1280
|CountryCode = ho
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One Hundred Twelfth Congress of the United States of America AT THE FIRST SESSION Begun and held at the City of Washington on Wednesday,
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
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the fifth day of January, two thousand and eleven
|Map = Ho-map.gif
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=An Act=
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/hnwb522.pdf
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To amend the Peace Corps Act to require sexual assault risk-reduction and response training, the development of a sexual assault policy, the establishment of an Office of Victim Advocacy, the establishment of a Sexual Assault Advisory Council, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of
|Region = [[Central America and Mexico]]
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the United States of America in Congress assembled,
|CountryDirector = [[Trudy Jaycox]]
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==SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.==
|Sectors = [[Protected Areas Management]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Menelio Bardales]])<br> [[Business Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Edel Perez-Campos]])<br> [[Municipal Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Alejandrina Carrasco]]) <br> [[Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Helmuth Castro]])<br> [[Water Sanitation and Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Martin Rivera]])<br> [[Youth Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Sandra Gomez]])
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This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Kate Puzey Peace Corps Volunteer Protection Act of 2011’’.
|ProgramDates = [[1963]] - [[Present]]
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==SEC. 2. PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER PROTECTION.==
|CurrentlyServing = 194
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The Peace Corps Act is amended by inserting after section 8 (22 U.S.C. 2507) the following new sections:
|TotalVolunteers = 5375
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‘‘SEXUAL ASSAULT RISK-REDUCTION AND RESPONSE TRAINING
|Languages = [[Mi`skito]], [[Spanish]]
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‘‘SEC. 8A.
|Flag = Honduras.GIF
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* (a) IN GENERAL.—As part of the training provided to all volunteers under section 8(a), the President shall develop and implement comprehensive sexual assault risk-reduction and response training that, to the extent practicable, conforms to best practices in the sexual assault field.
|stagingdate= February 23 2011
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*‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.
|stagingcity= Atlanta
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—In developing the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, as appropriate, the recommendations and views of experts in the sexual assault field.
}}
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* ‘‘(c) SUBSEQUENT TRAINING.
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—Once a volunteer has arrived in his or her country of service, the President shall provide the volunteer with training tailored to the country of service that includes cultural training relating to gender relations, risk-reduction strategies, treatment available in such country (including sexual assault forensic exams, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV exposure, screening for sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy testing), MedEvac procedures, and information regarding a victim’s right to pursue legal action against a perpetrator.
 +
* ‘‘(d) INFORMATION REGARDING CRIMES AND RISKS.
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—Each applicant for enrollment as a volunteer shall be provided with information regarding crimes against and risks to volunteers in the country in which the applicant has been invited to serve, including an overview of past crimes against volunteers in the country.
 +
* ‘‘(e) CONTACT INFORMATION.
 +
—The President shall provide each applicant, before the applicant enrolls as a volunteer, with— S. 1280—2
 +
* ‘‘(1) the contact information of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps for purposes of reporting sexual assault mismanagement or any other mismanagement, misconduct, wrongdoing, or violations of law or policy whenever it involves a Peace Corps employee, volunteer, contractor, or outside party that receives funds from the Peace Corps;
 +
*‘‘(2) clear, written guidelines regarding whom to contact,including the direct telephone number for the designated Sexual Assault Response Liaison (SARL) and the Office of Victim Advocacy and what steps to take in the event of a sexual assault or other crime; and
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*‘‘(3) contact information for a 24-hour sexual assault hotline to be established for the purpose of providing volunteers a mechanism to anonymously—
 +
* ‘‘(A) report sexual assault;
 +
*‘‘(B) receive crisis counseling in the event of a sexual assault; and
 +
* ‘‘(C) seek information about Peace Corps sexual assault reporting and response procedures.
 +
*‘‘(f) DEFINITIONS.—In this section and sections 8B through 8G:
 +
* ‘‘(1) PERSONALLY IDENTIFYING INFORMATION.—The term ‘personally identifying information’ means individually identifying information for or about a volunteer who is a victim of sexual assault, including information likely to disclose the location of such victim, including the following:
 +
* ‘‘(A) A first and last name.
 +
*‘‘(B) A home or other physical address.
 +
* ‘‘(C) Contact information (including a postal, email, or Internet protocol address, or telephone or facsimile number).
 +
* ‘‘(D) A social security number.
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*‘‘(E) Any other information, including date of birth, racial or ethnic background, or religious affiliation, that, in combination with information described in subparagraphs
 +
(A) through (D), would serve to identify the victim.
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*‘‘(2) RESTRICTED REPORTING.—
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*‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘restricted reporting’ means a system of reporting that allows a volunteer who is sexually assaulted to confidentially disclose the details of his or her assault to specified individuals and receive the services outlined in section 8B(c) without the dissemination of his or her personally identifying information except as necessary for the provision of such services, and without automatically triggering an official investigative process.
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*‘‘(B) EXCEPTIONS.—In cases in which volunteers elect restricted reporting, disclosure of their personally identifying information is authorized to the following persons
 +
or organizations when disclosure would be for the following reasons:
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* ‘‘(i) Peace Corps staff or law enforcement when authorized by the victim in writing.
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* ‘‘(ii) Peace Corps staff or law enforcement to prevent or lessen a serious or imminent threat to the health or safety of the victim or another person. S. 1280—3
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* ‘‘(iii) SARLs, victim advocates or healthcare providers when required for the provision of victim services.
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*‘‘(iv) State and Federal courts when ordered, or if disclosure is required by Federal or State statute.
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*‘‘(C) NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE AND PRIVACY PROTECTION.—In cases in which information is disclosed pursuant to subparagraph (B), the President shall—
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*‘‘(i) make reasonable attempts to provide notice to the volunteer with respect to whom such information is being released; and
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* ‘‘(ii) take such action as is necessary to protect the privacy and safety of the volunteer.
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*‘‘(3) SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The term ‘sexual assault’ means any conduct prescribed by chapter 109A of title 18, United States Code, whether or not the conduct occurs in the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States, and includes both assaults committed by offenders who are strangers to the victim and assaults committed by offenders who are known or related by blood or marriage to the victim.
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* ‘‘(4) STALKING.—The term ‘stalking’ means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—
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*‘‘(A) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or
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*‘‘(B) suffer substantial emotional distress.
  
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===‘‘SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY===
 +
‘‘SEC. 8B. (a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall develop and implement a comprehensive sexual assault policy that—
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* ‘‘(1) includes a system for restricted and unrestricted reporting of sexual assault;
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* ‘‘(2) mandates, for each Peace Corps country program, the designation of a Sexual Assault Response Liaison (SARL), who shall receive comprehensive training on procedures to respond to reports of sexual assault, with duties including ensuring that volunteers who are victims of sexual assault are moved to a safe environment and accompanying victims through the in-country response at the request of the victim;
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* ‘‘(3) requires SARLs to immediately contact a Victim Advocate upon receiving a report of sexual assault in accordance with the restricted and unrestricted reporting guidelines promulgated by the Peace Corps;
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* ‘‘(4) to the extent practicable, conforms to best practices in the sexual assault field;
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*‘‘(5) is applicable to all posts at which volunteers serve; and
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*‘‘(6) includes a guarantee that volunteers will not suffer loss of living allowances for reporting a sexual assault.
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*‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.—In developing the sexual assault policy under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, asappropriate, the recommendations and views of experts in the sexual assault field,
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including experts with international experience.
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*‘‘(c) ELEMENTS.—The sexual assault policy developed under subsection (a) shall include, at a minimum, the following services with respect to a volunteer who has been a victim of sexual assault: S. 1280—4
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*‘‘(1) The option of pursuing either restricted or unrestricted reporting of an assault.
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*‘‘(2) Provision of a SARL and Victim’s Advocate to the volunteer.
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*‘‘(3) At a volunteer’s discretion, provision of a sexual assault forensic exam in accordance with applicable host country law.
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*‘‘(4) If necessary, the provision of emergency health care, including a mechanism for such volunteer to evaluate such provider.
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*‘‘(5) If necessary, the provision of counseling and psychiatric medication.
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*‘‘(6) Completion of a safety and treatment plan with the volunteer, if necessary.
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*‘‘(7) Evacuation of such volunteer for medical treatment, accompanied by a Peace Corps staffer at the request of such volunteer. When evacuated to the United States, such volunteer shall be provided, to the extent practicable, a choice of medical providers including a mechanism for such volunteers to evaluate the provider.
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*‘‘(8) An explanation to the volunteer of available law enforcement and prosecutorial options, and legal representation.
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*‘‘(d) TRAINING.—The President shall train all staff outside the United States regarding the sexual assault policy developed under subsection (a).
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===‘‘OFFICE OF VICTIM ADVOCACY===
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‘‘SEC. 8C. (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE OF VICTIMS
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ADVOCACY.—
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*‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall establish an Office of Victim Advocacy in Peace Corps headquarters headed by a full-time victim advocate who shall report directly to the Director. The Office of Victim Advocacy may deploy personnel abroad when necessary to help assist victims.
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*‘‘(2) PROHIBITION.—Peace Corps Medical Officers, Safety and Security Officers, and program staff may not serve as victim advocates. The victim advocate referred to in paragraph
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*(1) may not have any other duties in the Peace Corps that are not reasonably connected to victim advocacy.
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*‘‘(3) EXEMPTION.—The victim advocate and any additional victim advocates shall be exempt from the limitations specified in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (2) and paragraph (5) under section 7(a) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)).
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*‘‘(b) RESPONSIBILITIES.—
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*‘‘(1) VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall help develop and update the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training described in section 8A and the sexual assault policy described in section 8B, ensure that volunteers who are victims of sexual assault receive services specified in section 8B(c), and facilitate their access to such services.
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*‘‘(2) OTHER CRIMES.—In addition to assisting victims of sexual assault in accordance with paragraph (1), the Office of Victim Advocacy shall assist volunteers who are victims of crime by making such victims aware of the services available to them and facilitating their access to such services. S. 1280—5
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*‘‘(3) PRIORITY.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall give priority to cases involving serious crimes, including sexual assault and stalking.
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*‘‘(c) STATUS UPDATES.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall provide to volunteers who are victims regular updates on the status of their cases if such volunteers have opted to pursue prosecution.
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‘‘(d) TRANSITION.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall assist volunteers who are victims of crime and whose service has terminated in receiving the services specified in section 8B(c) requested by such volunteer.
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*‘‘(e) SUNSET.—This section shall cease to be effective on October 1, 2018.
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‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF SEXUAL ASSAULT ADVISORY COUNCIL
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‘‘SEC. 8D.
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*(a) ESTABLISHMENT.—There is established a Sexual Assault Advisory Council (in this section referred to as the ‘Council’).
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*‘‘(b) MEMBERSHIP.—The Council shall be composed of not less than 8 individuals selected by the President, not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this section, who are returned volunteers (including volunteers who were victims of sexual assault and volunteers who were not victims of sexual assault) and governmental and nongovernmental experts and professionals in the sexual assault field. No Peace Corps employee shall be a member of the Council. The number of governmental experts appointed to the Council shall not exceed the number of nongovernmental experts.
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*‘‘(c) FUNCTIONS; MEETINGS.—The Council shall meet not less often than annually to review the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training developed under section 8A, the sexual assault policy developed under section 8B, and such other matters related to sexual assault the Council views as appropriate, to ensure that such training and policy conform to the extent practicable to best practices in the sexual assault field.
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*‘‘(d) REPORTS.—On an annual basis for 5 years after the date of the enactment of this section and at the discretion of the Council thereafter, the Council shall submit to the President and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee
 +
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report on its findings based on the reviews conducted pursuant to subsection
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(c).
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*‘‘(e) EMPLOYEE STATUS.—Members of the Council shall not be considered employees of the United States Government for any purpose and shall not receive compensation other than reimbursement of travel expenses and per diem allowance in accordance with section 5703 of title 5, United States Code.
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*‘‘(f) NONAPPLICABILITY OF FACA.—The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Council.
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*‘‘(g) SUNSET.—This section shall cease to be effective on October
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1, 2018.
  
Honduras offers natural scenic beauty and variety as well as a favorable climate in a semitropical setting. The Peace Corps has enjoyed a long and proud history in Honduras. More than 5,000 Volunteers have served as since the inception of the program in 1963.
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===‘‘VOLUNTEER FEEDBACK AND PEACE CORPS REVIEW===
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''see more explanation:''  [[Puzey Act volunteer surveys]]
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‘‘SEC. 8E.
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*(a) MONITORING AND EVALUATION.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this section, the President shall establish goals, metrics, and monitoring and evaluation plans S. 1280—6 for all Peace Corps programs. Monitoring and evaluation plans shall incorporate best practices from monitoring and evaluation studies and analyses.
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*‘‘(b) PERFORMANCE PLANS AND ELEMENTS.—The President shall establish performance plans with performance elements and standards for Peace Corps representatives and shall review the performance of Peace Corps representatives not less than annually to determine whether they have met these performance elements and standards. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed as limiting the discretion of the President to remove a Peace Corps representative.
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*‘‘(c) ANNUAL VOLUNTEER SURVEYS.—Annually through September 30, 2018, the President shall conduct a confidential survey of volunteers regarding the effectiveness of Peace Corps programs and staff and the safety of volunteers. The results shall be provided in aggregate form without identifying information to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives. Results from the annual volunteer survey shall be considered in reviewing the performance of Peace Corps representatives under subsection (a).
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*‘‘(d) PEACE CORPS INSPECTOR GENERAL.—The Inspector General of the Peace Corps shall—
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*‘‘(1) submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives—
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*‘‘(A) a report, not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section, and biennially through September 30, 2018, on reports received from volunteers
 +
relating to misconduct, mismanagement, or policy violations of Peace Corps staff, any breaches of the confidentiality of volunteers, and any actions taken to assure the
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safety of volunteers who provide such reports;
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*‘‘(B) a report, not later than two years and five years after the date of the enactment of this section, evaluating the effectiveness and implementation of the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training developed under section 8A and the sexual assault policy developed under section 8B, including a case review of a statistically significant number of cases; and
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*‘‘(C) a report, not later than two years after the date of the enactment of this section, describing how Peace Corps representatives are hired, how Peace Corps representatives are terminated, and how Peace Corps representatives hire staff, including an assessment of the implementation of the performance plans described in subsection (b); and
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*‘‘(2) when conducting audits or evaluations of Peace Corps programs overseas, notify the Director of the Peace Corps about the results of such evaluations, including concerns the Inspector General has noted, if any, about the performance of Peace Corps representatives, for appropriate action.
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*‘‘(e) PORTFOLIO REVIEWS.—
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*‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall, at least once every 3 years, perform a review to evaluate the allocation and delivery of resources across the countries the Peace Corps serves or S. 1280—7 is considering for service. Such portfolio reviews shall at a minimum include the following with respect to each such country:
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*‘‘(A) An evaluation of the country’s commitment to the Peace Corps program.
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*‘‘(B) An analysis of the safety and security of volunteers.
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*‘‘(C) An evaluation of the country’s need for assistance.
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*‘‘(D) An analysis of country program costs.
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*‘‘(E) An evaluation of the effectiveness of management of each post within a country.
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*‘‘(F) An evaluation of the country’s congruence with the Peace Corp’s mission and strategic priorities.
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*‘‘(2) BRIEFING.—Upon request of the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate or the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House
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of Representatives, the President shall brief such committees on each portfolio review required under paragraph (1). If requested, each such briefing shall discuss performance measures and sources of data used (such as project status reports, volunteer surveys, impact studies, reports of Inspector General of the Peace Corps, and any relevant external sources) in making the findings and conclusions in such review.
  
Peace Corps/Honduras works in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and child survival, business, protected area management, water and sanitation, municipal development, and youth development. Volunteers in these six projects work in an integrated community development framework, meeting the expressed needs of the communities where they serve.
 
  
* [http://www.grosir-kosmetik.com/63-been-pink-beauty-series.html Been pink]
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===‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF A POLICY ON STALKING===
* [http://www.tokobungasabana.com Toko bunga jakarta]
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‘‘SEC. 8F.
* [http://www.tokobungasabana.com Toko bunga online]
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*(a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall develop and implement a comprehensive policy on stalking that—
* [http://www.awanirentcar.com/pricelist Sewa mobil jakarta]
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*‘‘(1) requires an immediate, effective, and thorough response from the Peace Corps upon receipt of a report of stalking;
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*‘‘(2) provides, during training, all Peace Corps volunteers with a point of contact for the reporting of stalking; and
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*‘‘(3) protects the confidentiality of volunteers who report stalking to the maximum extent practicable.
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*‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.—In developing the stalking policy under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, as appropriate, the recommendations and views of those with expertise regarding the crime of stalking.
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*‘‘(c) TRAINING OF IN-COUNTRY STAFF.—The President shall provide for the training of all in-country staff regarding the stalking policy developed under subsection (a).
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===‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF A CONFIDENTIALITY PROTECTION POLICY===
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‘‘SEC. 8G.
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*(a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall establish and maintain a process to allow volunteers to report incidents of misconduct or mismanagement, or violations of any policy, of the Peace Corps in order to protect the confidentiality and safety of such volunteers and of the information reported, and to ensure that such information is acted on appropriately. This process shall conform to existing best practices regarding confidentiality.
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*‘‘(b) GUIDANCE.—The President shall provide additional training to officers and employees of the Peace Corps who have access to information reported by volunteers under subsection (a) in order to protect against the inappropriate disclosures of such information and ensure the safety of such volunteers. S. 1280—8
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*‘‘(c) PENALTY.—Any Peace Corps volunteer or staff member who is responsible for maintaining confidentiality under subsection
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* (a) and who breaches such duty shall be subject to disciplinary action, including termination, and in the case of a staff member, ineligibility for re-employment with the Peace Corps.
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===‘‘REMOVAL AND ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION===
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‘‘SEC. 8H.
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*(a) IN GENERAL.—If a volunteer requests removal from the site in which such volunteer is serving because the volunteer feels at risk of imminent bodily harm, the President shall, as expeditiously as practical after receiving such request, remove the volunteer from the site. If the President receives such a request, the President shall assess and evaluate the safety of such site and may not assign another volunteer to the site until such time as the assessment and evaluation is complete and the site has been determined to be safe. Volunteers may remain at a site during the assessment and evaluation.
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*‘‘(b) DETERMINATION OF SITE AS UNSAFE.—If the President determines that a site is unsafe for any remaining volunteers at the site, the President shall, as expeditiously as practical, remove all volunteers from the site.
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*‘‘(c) TRACKING AND RECORDING.—The President shall establish a global tracking and recording system to track and record incidents of crimes against volunteers.
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===‘‘REPORTING REQUIREMENTS===
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‘‘SEC. 8I.
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*(a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall annually through September 30, 2018, submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report summarizing information on—
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*‘‘(1) sexual assault of volunteers;
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*‘‘(2) other crimes against volunteers;
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*‘‘(3) the number of arrests, prosecutions, and incarcerations for crimes involving Peace Corps volunteers for every country in which volunteers serve; and
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*‘‘(4) the annual rate of early termination of volunteers, including demographic data associated with such early termination.
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*‘‘(b) GAO.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report evaluating the quality and accessibility of health care provided through the Department of Labor to returned volunteers upon their separation from the Peace Corps.
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*‘‘(c) ACCESS TO COMMUNICATIONS.
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*‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall determine the level of access to communication, including cellular and Internet access, of each volunteer.
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*‘‘(2) REPORT.—Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this section, the President shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House S. 1280—9 of Representatives a report on the costs, feasibility, and benefits of providing all volunteers with access to adequate communication, including cellular service and Internet access.’’.
  
==Peace Corps History==
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==SEC. 3. RETENTION OF COUNSEL FOR CRIME VICTIMS.==
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Section 5(l) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2504(l)) is amended by inserting before the period at the end the following: ‘‘and counsel may be employed and counsel fees, court costs and other expenses may be paid in the support of volunteers who are parties, complaining witnesses, or otherwise participating in the prosecution of crimes committed against such volunteers’’.
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==SEC. 4. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON STAFFING OF OFFICE OF VICTIM ADVOCACY.==
 +
It is the sense of Congress that—
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*(1) the Office of Victim Advocacy established under section 8C of the Peace Corps Act, as added by section 2, should provide an adequate number of victim advocates so that each victim of crime receives critical information and support;
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*(2) any full-time victim advocates and any additional victim advocates should be credentialed by a national victims assistance body; and
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*(3) the training required under section 8A(a) of the Peace Corps Act, as added by section 2, should be credentialed by a national victims assistance body.
 +
==SEC. 5. PERSONAL SERVICE CONTRACTS.==
 +
The Peace Corps Act is amended—
 +
*(1) in section 7(a)(3) (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)(3)), by inserting ‘‘, or contracted with for personal services under section 10(a)(5),’’ after ‘‘employed, appointed, or assigned under this subsection’’; and
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*(2) in section 10(a)(5) (22 U.S.C. 2509(a)(5)), by striking ‘‘any purpose’’ and inserting ‘‘the purposes of any law administered by the Office of Personnel Management (except that the President may determine the applicability to such individuals of provisions of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.))’’.
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==SEC. 6. INDEPENDENCE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE PEACE CORPS.==
 +
Section 7(a) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: ‘‘(7) The limitations specified in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (2) and in paragraph (5) shall not apply to—
 +
*‘‘(A) the Inspector General of the Peace Corps; and
 +
*‘‘(B) officers and employees of the Office of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps.’’.
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Honduras]]''
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==SEC. 7. CONFORMING SAFETY AND SECURITY AGREEMENT REGARDING PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS SERVING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.==
 +
*(a) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Peace Corps shall consult with the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security and enter into a memorandum of understanding that specifies the S. 1280—10 duties and obligations of the Peace Corps and the Bureau of Diplomatic Security of the Department of State with respect to the protection of Peace Corps volunteers and staff members serving in foreign countries, including with respect to investigations of safety and security incidents and crimes committed against volunteers
 +
and staff members.
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*(b) INSPECTOR GENERAL REVIEW.—
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*(1) REVIEW.—The Inspector General of the Peace Corps shall review the memorandum of understanding described in subsection (a) and be afforded the opportunity to recommend changes that advance the safety and security of Peace Corps volunteers before entry into force of the memorandum of understanding.
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*(2) REPORT.—The Director of the Peace Corps shall consider the recommendations of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps regarding the memorandum of understanding described in subsection (a). If the Director enters into the memorandum of understanding without implementing a recommendation of the Inspector General, the Director shall submit to the Inspector General a written explanation relating thereto.
 +
*(c) FAILURE TO MEET DEADLINE.—
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*(1) REQUIREMENT TO SUBMIT REPORT.—If, by the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Peace Corps is unable to obtain agreement with the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security and certification by the Inspector General of the Peace Corps, the Director shall submit to the committees of Congress specified in paragraph (2) a report explaining the reasons for such failure and a certification that substantial steps are being taken
 +
to make progress toward agreement.
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*(2) COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS SPECIFIED.—The committees of Congress specified in this paragraph are the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on
 +
Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.
 +
==SEC. 8. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.==
 +
*(a) INCLUSION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT RISK-REDUCTION AND RESPONSE TRAINING.—The Peace Corps Act is amended—
 +
*(1) in section 5(a) (22 U.S.C. 2504(a)), in the second sentence, by inserting ‘‘(including training under section 8A)’’ after ‘‘training’’; and
 +
*(2) in section 8(a) (22 U.S.C. 2507(a)), in the first sentence, by inserting ‘‘, including training under section 8A,’’ after‘‘training’’.
 +
*(b) CERTAIN SERVICES.—Section 5(e) of the Peace Corps Act(22 U.S.C. 2504(e)) is amended, in the first sentence—
 +
*(1) by inserting ‘‘(including, if necessary, for volunteers and trainees, services under section 8B)’’ after ‘‘health care’’;and
 +
*(2) by inserting ‘‘including services provided in accordance with section 8B (except that the six-month limitation shall not apply in the case of such services),’’ before ‘‘as the President’’.
  
Times have changed since the first lady of Honduras, Doña Alejandra Bermudez de Villeda Morales, accompanied the first training class of Peace Corps Volunteers to Honduras in 1962. Over the past 43 years, more than 5,000 Volunteers have served in Honduras in a wide range of project areas, including health, fisheries, beekeeping, animal husbandry, special education, vocational education, small business, and agriculture. Project areas and numbers of Volunteers have changed in response to the changing needs of the country. Projects such as fisheries, beekeeping, and education were phased out as Honduran people and institutions developed the capacity to continue the work on their own. Other projects, such as municipal development, HIV/AIDS prevention, and business development, have been initiated or have evolved with technological advances, increased globalization of world markets, and other developments.
+
==SEC. 9. OFFSET OF COSTS AND PERSONNEL.==
 +
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Direct of the Peace Corps shall— S. 1280—11
 +
*(1) eliminate such initiatives, positions, and programs within the Peace Corps (other than within the Office of Inspector General) as the Director deems necessary to ensure any and all costs incurred to carry out the provisions of this Act, and the amendments made by this Act, are entirely offset;
 +
*(2) ensure no net increase in personnel are added to carry out the provisions of this Act, with any new full or part time employees or equivalents offset by eliminating an equivalent number of existing staff (other than within the Office of Inspector General);
 +
*(3) report to Congress not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act the actions taken to ensure compliance with paragraphs (1) and (2), including the specific initiatives, positions, and programs within the Peace Corps that have been eliminated to ensure that the costs of carrying out this Act will be offset; and
 +
*(4) not implement any other provision of this Act (other than paragraphs (1), (2), and (3)) or any amendment made by this Act until the Director has certified that the actions specified in paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) have been completed.
  
In response to the crisis caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, the number of Volunteers in Honduras increased dramatically. Today an average of 200 Volunteers work in the western, eastern, and southern regions of Honduras. In 2003 Peace Corps/Honduras expanded its program to the north coast of Honduras.
 
  
There are two published Peace Corps Experience books in print. "Triumph and Hope; Golden Years With the Peace Corps Honduras," by Barbara E. Joe describes service between 2000 and 2002 (Barbara Joe, 2008). "South of the Frontera; A Peace Corps Memoir" by Lawrence F. Lihosit describes service between 1975 and 1977 (iUniverse, NY, 2010). 
 
  
 +
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate.
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Honduras]]''
+
==Files==
 +
*http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/File:Puzey_Peace_Corps_Reform_Legislation_2011.pdf (final)
 +
*http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/S.1280_Peace_Corps_Act.pdf (first draft)
  
Volunteer housing varies according to the area of the country and its climate. In much of the southern region, houses are open and airy to provide ventilation. Houses tend to be more closed in mountainous areas. Some Volunteers live in houses made of adobe, while others live in houses made of wood or cinder blocks or in apartments. Roofing generally consists of clay tiles or corrugated metal. Most Volunteer houses have electricity and running water, though the source of water is often outside the house and water may flow only sporadically. Housing in rural sites may have outdoor latrines instead of indoor plumbing.
+
==Related==
 +
*http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Puzey_Act_volunteer_surveys
 +
*http://www.katesvoice.net/
 +
*http://firstresponseaction.org/
  
Peace Corps/Honduras will provide Volunteers with one secure housing option upon site assignment where Volunteers must live for at least the first two months. Peace Corps/Honduras may also suggest other housing options that can be explored by Volunteers after the initial two-month period. Volunteers will not be assigned to communities where adequate housing is not available.
+
[[Category:resources]]
 
+
[[Category:Congressional]]
The Peace Corps expects Volunteers to use good judgment in deciding where and with whom to live after the initial time period. Volunteers are strongly encouraged to live with a family and to take the necessary time to choose a living situation that considers community norms, language acquisition, and personal safety.
 
 
 
During the site-selection process, project teams will determine the availability of adequate housing. If no options are available, the site will not host a Volunteer. Safe and secure housing is a priority, and Peace Corps/Honduras will help you work with the landlord to make any necessary modifications to improve the safety and security of your home, such as adding deadbolt locks and bars on windows. Additionally, the Peace Corps makes an effort to select sites that offer reasonable and safe transportation. Keep in mind that rural areas of Honduras are more rustic than rural areas of the United States.
 
 
 
Peace Corps Volunteer sites are located throughout Honduras with the exception of the departments of Gracias a Dios and the Bay Islands. The site in which you eventually serve will be selected based upon the local needs of the community, your skills and interests, and the overall goals and objectives of the Peace Corps/Honduras project in which you will work.
 
 
 
==Training==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Training in Honduras]]''
 
 
 
Prior to becoming a Volunteer, you will participate in an 11week training program in Honduras. Pre-service training (PST) incorporates experiential learning and adult learning methodology that is meant to challenge you while preparing you to begin your work as a Volunteer. Though pre-service training can be taxing at times, Peace Corps/Honduras works to ensure that it is challenging and fun.
 
 
 
Upon arrival in Honduras, trainees move in with host families after a brief introductory session. The first four weeks of training take place in a large group and include trainees from various projects. In the fifth week, most trainees will move to other communities for field-based training, which focuses on the practical application of project technical skills.
 
 
 
Although you were recruited for a particular project and your training will be tailored to the requirements of that project, all Volunteers are considered to be community development facilitators. You will receive theoretical and hands-on training in community analysis, participatory analysis, gender analysis, community development, and integrated community development and become familiar with current development efforts in Honduras. As the weeks pass, you may find that you need to adapt both existing skills and new skills to the work environment in Honduras.
 
 
 
==Health Care and Safety==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Honduras]]''
 
 
 
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Honduras maintains a clinic with four full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary health-care needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and treatment, are also available at regional medical facilities. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a major hospital in the capital and then, if necessary, medically evacuated to the United States.
 
 
 
 
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Honduras]]''
 
 
 
In Honduras, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Honduras.
 
 
 
Outside of Honduras’ capital and other large cities, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is viewed as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Honduras are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
 
 
 
To ease the transition and adapt to life in Honduras, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.
 
 
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 
* Possible Issues for Married Volunteers
 
 
 
 
 
==Frequently Asked Questions==
 
 
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 
|H1r=  48
 
|H1s=  70.3
 
|H2r=  38
 
|H2s=  83
 
|H3r=  46
 
|H3s=  82.4
 
|H4r=  26
 
|H4s=  106.6
 
|H5r=  35
 
|H5s=  53.2
 
|H6r=  50
 
|H6s=  75.4
 
}}
 
 
 
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Honduras]]''
 
 
 
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Honduras?
 
* What is the electric current in Honduras?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
* What should I bring as gifts for Honduran friends and my host family?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
* Can I call home from Honduras?
 
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
==Packing List==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Packing list for Honduras]]''
 
 
 
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Honduras and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Honduras.
 
 
 
Your clothes should be sturdy enough to hold up under rough wear and laundry techniques and free of the need for ironing. The amount of professional versus casual clothing you bring should be based on personal preference and on the type of work you will be doing. For example, a water and sanitation Volunteer probably needs more casual clothes for work than does a small business Volunteer. Shorts are acceptable in limited circumstances, but especially in larger towns and for athletic activities. Women, however, should also bring sweatpants that are comfortable to work out in. Note that big and tall sizes are often difficult to find in Honduras, as are women’s shoes larger than size 8 and men’s shoes larger than size 10-1/2. Because there are many good tailors and seamstresses in Honduras who can make many styles at a reasonable price, you may want to bring patterns or pictures of clothing that they can copy or adapt for you.
 
 
 
* General Clothing
 
* For Men
 
* Shoes
 
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 
* Kitchen
 
* Miscellaneous
 
 
 
 
 
==Peace Corps News==
 
 
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
 
 
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22honduras%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 
 
 
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/ho/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
 
 
 
==Country Fund==
 
 
 
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=522-CFD Honduras Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Honduras. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
 
 
 
==See also==
 
* [[Volunteers who served in Honduras]]
 
* [[Amigos de Honduras]]
 
* [[List of resources for Honduras]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 
 
 
 
 
==External links==
 
* [http://www.pccatrachos.com/ Honduras Homepage]
 
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ho.html Peace Corps Journals - Honduras]
 
* [http://groups.yahoo.com/group/volscatrachos/ Volscatrachos Yahoo Group]
 
[[Category:Honduras]] [[Category:Central America and Mexico]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 

Revision as of 14:17, 7 November 2011

S. 1280 One Hundred Twelfth Congress of the United States of America AT THE FIRST SESSION Begun and held at the City of Washington on Wednesday, the fifth day of January, two thousand and eleven

An Act

To amend the Peace Corps Act to require sexual assault risk-reduction and response training, the development of a sexual assault policy, the establishment of an Office of Victim Advocacy, the establishment of a Sexual Assault Advisory Council, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Kate Puzey Peace Corps Volunteer Protection Act of 2011’’.

SEC. 2. PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER PROTECTION.

The Peace Corps Act is amended by inserting after section 8 (22 U.S.C. 2507) the following new sections: ‘‘SEXUAL ASSAULT RISK-REDUCTION AND RESPONSE TRAINING ‘‘SEC. 8A.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—As part of the training provided to all volunteers under section 8(a), the President shall develop and implement comprehensive sexual assault risk-reduction and response training that, to the extent practicable, conforms to best practices in the sexual assault field.
  • ‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.

—In developing the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, as appropriate, the recommendations and views of experts in the sexual assault field.

  • ‘‘(c) SUBSEQUENT TRAINING.

—Once a volunteer has arrived in his or her country of service, the President shall provide the volunteer with training tailored to the country of service that includes cultural training relating to gender relations, risk-reduction strategies, treatment available in such country (including sexual assault forensic exams, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV exposure, screening for sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy testing), MedEvac procedures, and information regarding a victim’s right to pursue legal action against a perpetrator.

  • ‘‘(d) INFORMATION REGARDING CRIMES AND RISKS.

—Each applicant for enrollment as a volunteer shall be provided with information regarding crimes against and risks to volunteers in the country in which the applicant has been invited to serve, including an overview of past crimes against volunteers in the country.

  • ‘‘(e) CONTACT INFORMATION.

—The President shall provide each applicant, before the applicant enrolls as a volunteer, with— S. 1280—2

  • ‘‘(1) the contact information of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps for purposes of reporting sexual assault mismanagement or any other mismanagement, misconduct, wrongdoing, or violations of law or policy whenever it involves a Peace Corps employee, volunteer, contractor, or outside party that receives funds from the Peace Corps;
  • ‘‘(2) clear, written guidelines regarding whom to contact,including the direct telephone number for the designated Sexual Assault Response Liaison (SARL) and the Office of Victim Advocacy and what steps to take in the event of a sexual assault or other crime; and
  • ‘‘(3) contact information for a 24-hour sexual assault hotline to be established for the purpose of providing volunteers a mechanism to anonymously—
  • ‘‘(A) report sexual assault;
  • ‘‘(B) receive crisis counseling in the event of a sexual assault; and
  • ‘‘(C) seek information about Peace Corps sexual assault reporting and response procedures.
  • ‘‘(f) DEFINITIONS.—In this section and sections 8B through 8G:
  • ‘‘(1) PERSONALLY IDENTIFYING INFORMATION.—The term ‘personally identifying information’ means individually identifying information for or about a volunteer who is a victim of sexual assault, including information likely to disclose the location of such victim, including the following:
  • ‘‘(A) A first and last name.
  • ‘‘(B) A home or other physical address.
  • ‘‘(C) Contact information (including a postal, email, or Internet protocol address, or telephone or facsimile number).
  • ‘‘(D) A social security number.
  • ‘‘(E) Any other information, including date of birth, racial or ethnic background, or religious affiliation, that, in combination with information described in subparagraphs

(A) through (D), would serve to identify the victim.

  • ‘‘(2) RESTRICTED REPORTING.—
  • ‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘restricted reporting’ means a system of reporting that allows a volunteer who is sexually assaulted to confidentially disclose the details of his or her assault to specified individuals and receive the services outlined in section 8B(c) without the dissemination of his or her personally identifying information except as necessary for the provision of such services, and without automatically triggering an official investigative process.
  • ‘‘(B) EXCEPTIONS.—In cases in which volunteers elect restricted reporting, disclosure of their personally identifying information is authorized to the following persons

or organizations when disclosure would be for the following reasons:

  • ‘‘(i) Peace Corps staff or law enforcement when authorized by the victim in writing.
  • ‘‘(ii) Peace Corps staff or law enforcement to prevent or lessen a serious or imminent threat to the health or safety of the victim or another person. S. 1280—3
  • ‘‘(iii) SARLs, victim advocates or healthcare providers when required for the provision of victim services.
  • ‘‘(iv) State and Federal courts when ordered, or if disclosure is required by Federal or State statute.
  • ‘‘(C) NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE AND PRIVACY PROTECTION.—In cases in which information is disclosed pursuant to subparagraph (B), the President shall—
  • ‘‘(i) make reasonable attempts to provide notice to the volunteer with respect to whom such information is being released; and
  • ‘‘(ii) take such action as is necessary to protect the privacy and safety of the volunteer.
  • ‘‘(3) SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The term ‘sexual assault’ means any conduct prescribed by chapter 109A of title 18, United States Code, whether or not the conduct occurs in the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States, and includes both assaults committed by offenders who are strangers to the victim and assaults committed by offenders who are known or related by blood or marriage to the victim.
  • ‘‘(4) STALKING.—The term ‘stalking’ means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—
  • ‘‘(A) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or
  • ‘‘(B) suffer substantial emotional distress.

‘‘SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY

‘‘SEC. 8B. (a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall develop and implement a comprehensive sexual assault policy that—

  • ‘‘(1) includes a system for restricted and unrestricted reporting of sexual assault;
  • ‘‘(2) mandates, for each Peace Corps country program, the designation of a Sexual Assault Response Liaison (SARL), who shall receive comprehensive training on procedures to respond to reports of sexual assault, with duties including ensuring that volunteers who are victims of sexual assault are moved to a safe environment and accompanying victims through the in-country response at the request of the victim;
  • ‘‘(3) requires SARLs to immediately contact a Victim Advocate upon receiving a report of sexual assault in accordance with the restricted and unrestricted reporting guidelines promulgated by the Peace Corps;
  • ‘‘(4) to the extent practicable, conforms to best practices in the sexual assault field;
  • ‘‘(5) is applicable to all posts at which volunteers serve; and
  • ‘‘(6) includes a guarantee that volunteers will not suffer loss of living allowances for reporting a sexual assault.
  • ‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.—In developing the sexual assault policy under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, asappropriate, the recommendations and views of experts in the sexual assault field,

including experts with international experience.

  • ‘‘(c) ELEMENTS.—The sexual assault policy developed under subsection (a) shall include, at a minimum, the following services with respect to a volunteer who has been a victim of sexual assault: S. 1280—4
  • ‘‘(1) The option of pursuing either restricted or unrestricted reporting of an assault.
  • ‘‘(2) Provision of a SARL and Victim’s Advocate to the volunteer.
  • ‘‘(3) At a volunteer’s discretion, provision of a sexual assault forensic exam in accordance with applicable host country law.
  • ‘‘(4) If necessary, the provision of emergency health care, including a mechanism for such volunteer to evaluate such provider.
  • ‘‘(5) If necessary, the provision of counseling and psychiatric medication.
  • ‘‘(6) Completion of a safety and treatment plan with the volunteer, if necessary.
  • ‘‘(7) Evacuation of such volunteer for medical treatment, accompanied by a Peace Corps staffer at the request of such volunteer. When evacuated to the United States, such volunteer shall be provided, to the extent practicable, a choice of medical providers including a mechanism for such volunteers to evaluate the provider.
  • ‘‘(8) An explanation to the volunteer of available law enforcement and prosecutorial options, and legal representation.
  • ‘‘(d) TRAINING.—The President shall train all staff outside the United States regarding the sexual assault policy developed under subsection (a).

‘‘OFFICE OF VICTIM ADVOCACY

‘‘SEC. 8C. (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE OF VICTIMS ADVOCACY.—

  • ‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall establish an Office of Victim Advocacy in Peace Corps headquarters headed by a full-time victim advocate who shall report directly to the Director. The Office of Victim Advocacy may deploy personnel abroad when necessary to help assist victims.
  • ‘‘(2) PROHIBITION.—Peace Corps Medical Officers, Safety and Security Officers, and program staff may not serve as victim advocates. The victim advocate referred to in paragraph
  • (1) may not have any other duties in the Peace Corps that are not reasonably connected to victim advocacy.
  • ‘‘(3) EXEMPTION.—The victim advocate and any additional victim advocates shall be exempt from the limitations specified in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (2) and paragraph (5) under section 7(a) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)).
  • ‘‘(b) RESPONSIBILITIES.—
  • ‘‘(1) VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall help develop and update the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training described in section 8A and the sexual assault policy described in section 8B, ensure that volunteers who are victims of sexual assault receive services specified in section 8B(c), and facilitate their access to such services.
  • ‘‘(2) OTHER CRIMES.—In addition to assisting victims of sexual assault in accordance with paragraph (1), the Office of Victim Advocacy shall assist volunteers who are victims of crime by making such victims aware of the services available to them and facilitating their access to such services. S. 1280—5
  • ‘‘(3) PRIORITY.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall give priority to cases involving serious crimes, including sexual assault and stalking.
  • ‘‘(c) STATUS UPDATES.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall provide to volunteers who are victims regular updates on the status of their cases if such volunteers have opted to pursue prosecution.

‘‘(d) TRANSITION.—The Office of Victim Advocacy shall assist volunteers who are victims of crime and whose service has terminated in receiving the services specified in section 8B(c) requested by such volunteer.

  • ‘‘(e) SUNSET.—This section shall cease to be effective on October 1, 2018.

‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF SEXUAL ASSAULT ADVISORY COUNCIL ‘‘SEC. 8D.

  • (a) ESTABLISHMENT.—There is established a Sexual Assault Advisory Council (in this section referred to as the ‘Council’).
  • ‘‘(b) MEMBERSHIP.—The Council shall be composed of not less than 8 individuals selected by the President, not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this section, who are returned volunteers (including volunteers who were victims of sexual assault and volunteers who were not victims of sexual assault) and governmental and nongovernmental experts and professionals in the sexual assault field. No Peace Corps employee shall be a member of the Council. The number of governmental experts appointed to the Council shall not exceed the number of nongovernmental experts.
  • ‘‘(c) FUNCTIONS; MEETINGS.—The Council shall meet not less often than annually to review the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training developed under section 8A, the sexual assault policy developed under section 8B, and such other matters related to sexual assault the Council views as appropriate, to ensure that such training and policy conform to the extent practicable to best practices in the sexual assault field.
  • ‘‘(d) REPORTS.—On an annual basis for 5 years after the date of the enactment of this section and at the discretion of the Council thereafter, the Council shall submit to the President and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee

on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report on its findings based on the reviews conducted pursuant to subsection (c).

  • ‘‘(e) EMPLOYEE STATUS.—Members of the Council shall not be considered employees of the United States Government for any purpose and shall not receive compensation other than reimbursement of travel expenses and per diem allowance in accordance with section 5703 of title 5, United States Code.
  • ‘‘(f) NONAPPLICABILITY OF FACA.—The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Council.
  • ‘‘(g) SUNSET.—This section shall cease to be effective on October

1, 2018.

‘‘VOLUNTEER FEEDBACK AND PEACE CORPS REVIEW

see more explanation: Puzey Act volunteer surveys ‘‘SEC. 8E.

  • (a) MONITORING AND EVALUATION.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this section, the President shall establish goals, metrics, and monitoring and evaluation plans S. 1280—6 for all Peace Corps programs. Monitoring and evaluation plans shall incorporate best practices from monitoring and evaluation studies and analyses.
  • ‘‘(b) PERFORMANCE PLANS AND ELEMENTS.—The President shall establish performance plans with performance elements and standards for Peace Corps representatives and shall review the performance of Peace Corps representatives not less than annually to determine whether they have met these performance elements and standards. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed as limiting the discretion of the President to remove a Peace Corps representative.
  • ‘‘(c) ANNUAL VOLUNTEER SURVEYS.—Annually through September 30, 2018, the President shall conduct a confidential survey of volunteers regarding the effectiveness of Peace Corps programs and staff and the safety of volunteers. The results shall be provided in aggregate form without identifying information to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives. Results from the annual volunteer survey shall be considered in reviewing the performance of Peace Corps representatives under subsection (a).
  • ‘‘(d) PEACE CORPS INSPECTOR GENERAL.—The Inspector General of the Peace Corps shall—
  • ‘‘(1) submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives—
  • ‘‘(A) a report, not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section, and biennially through September 30, 2018, on reports received from volunteers

relating to misconduct, mismanagement, or policy violations of Peace Corps staff, any breaches of the confidentiality of volunteers, and any actions taken to assure the safety of volunteers who provide such reports;

  • ‘‘(B) a report, not later than two years and five years after the date of the enactment of this section, evaluating the effectiveness and implementation of the sexual assault risk-reduction and response training developed under section 8A and the sexual assault policy developed under section 8B, including a case review of a statistically significant number of cases; and
  • ‘‘(C) a report, not later than two years after the date of the enactment of this section, describing how Peace Corps representatives are hired, how Peace Corps representatives are terminated, and how Peace Corps representatives hire staff, including an assessment of the implementation of the performance plans described in subsection (b); and
  • ‘‘(2) when conducting audits or evaluations of Peace Corps programs overseas, notify the Director of the Peace Corps about the results of such evaluations, including concerns the Inspector General has noted, if any, about the performance of Peace Corps representatives, for appropriate action.
  • ‘‘(e) PORTFOLIO REVIEWS.—
  • ‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall, at least once every 3 years, perform a review to evaluate the allocation and delivery of resources across the countries the Peace Corps serves or S. 1280—7 is considering for service. Such portfolio reviews shall at a minimum include the following with respect to each such country:
  • ‘‘(A) An evaluation of the country’s commitment to the Peace Corps program.
  • ‘‘(B) An analysis of the safety and security of volunteers.
  • ‘‘(C) An evaluation of the country’s need for assistance.
  • ‘‘(D) An analysis of country program costs.
  • ‘‘(E) An evaluation of the effectiveness of management of each post within a country.
  • ‘‘(F) An evaluation of the country’s congruence with the Peace Corp’s mission and strategic priorities.
  • ‘‘(2) BRIEFING.—Upon request of the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate or the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House

of Representatives, the President shall brief such committees on each portfolio review required under paragraph (1). If requested, each such briefing shall discuss performance measures and sources of data used (such as project status reports, volunteer surveys, impact studies, reports of Inspector General of the Peace Corps, and any relevant external sources) in making the findings and conclusions in such review.


‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF A POLICY ON STALKING

‘‘SEC. 8F.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall develop and implement a comprehensive policy on stalking that—
  • ‘‘(1) requires an immediate, effective, and thorough response from the Peace Corps upon receipt of a report of stalking;
  • ‘‘(2) provides, during training, all Peace Corps volunteers with a point of contact for the reporting of stalking; and
  • ‘‘(3) protects the confidentiality of volunteers who report stalking to the maximum extent practicable.
  • ‘‘(b) DEVELOPMENT AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS.—In developing the stalking policy under subsection (a), the President shall consult with and incorporate, as appropriate, the recommendations and views of those with expertise regarding the crime of stalking.
  • ‘‘(c) TRAINING OF IN-COUNTRY STAFF.—The President shall provide for the training of all in-country staff regarding the stalking policy developed under subsection (a).

‘‘ESTABLISHMENT OF A CONFIDENTIALITY PROTECTION POLICY

‘‘SEC. 8G.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall establish and maintain a process to allow volunteers to report incidents of misconduct or mismanagement, or violations of any policy, of the Peace Corps in order to protect the confidentiality and safety of such volunteers and of the information reported, and to ensure that such information is acted on appropriately. This process shall conform to existing best practices regarding confidentiality.
  • ‘‘(b) GUIDANCE.—The President shall provide additional training to officers and employees of the Peace Corps who have access to information reported by volunteers under subsection (a) in order to protect against the inappropriate disclosures of such information and ensure the safety of such volunteers. S. 1280—8
  • ‘‘(c) PENALTY.—Any Peace Corps volunteer or staff member who is responsible for maintaining confidentiality under subsection
  • (a) and who breaches such duty shall be subject to disciplinary action, including termination, and in the case of a staff member, ineligibility for re-employment with the Peace Corps.

‘‘REMOVAL AND ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

‘‘SEC. 8H.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—If a volunteer requests removal from the site in which such volunteer is serving because the volunteer feels at risk of imminent bodily harm, the President shall, as expeditiously as practical after receiving such request, remove the volunteer from the site. If the President receives such a request, the President shall assess and evaluate the safety of such site and may not assign another volunteer to the site until such time as the assessment and evaluation is complete and the site has been determined to be safe. Volunteers may remain at a site during the assessment and evaluation.
  • ‘‘(b) DETERMINATION OF SITE AS UNSAFE.—If the President determines that a site is unsafe for any remaining volunteers at the site, the President shall, as expeditiously as practical, remove all volunteers from the site.
  • ‘‘(c) TRACKING AND RECORDING.—The President shall establish a global tracking and recording system to track and record incidents of crimes against volunteers.

‘‘REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

‘‘SEC. 8I.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—The President shall annually through September 30, 2018, submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report summarizing information on—
  • ‘‘(1) sexual assault of volunteers;
  • ‘‘(2) other crimes against volunteers;
  • ‘‘(3) the number of arrests, prosecutions, and incarcerations for crimes involving Peace Corps volunteers for every country in which volunteers serve; and
  • ‘‘(4) the annual rate of early termination of volunteers, including demographic data associated with such early termination.
  • ‘‘(b) GAO.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report evaluating the quality and accessibility of health care provided through the Department of Labor to returned volunteers upon their separation from the Peace Corps.
  • ‘‘(c) ACCESS TO COMMUNICATIONS.—
  • ‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The President shall determine the level of access to communication, including cellular and Internet access, of each volunteer.
  • ‘‘(2) REPORT.—Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this section, the President shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House S. 1280—9 of Representatives a report on the costs, feasibility, and benefits of providing all volunteers with access to adequate communication, including cellular service and Internet access.’’.

SEC. 3. RETENTION OF COUNSEL FOR CRIME VICTIMS.

Section 5(l) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2504(l)) is amended by inserting before the period at the end the following: ‘‘and counsel may be employed and counsel fees, court costs and other expenses may be paid in the support of volunteers who are parties, complaining witnesses, or otherwise participating in the prosecution of crimes committed against such volunteers’’.

SEC. 4. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON STAFFING OF OFFICE OF VICTIM ADVOCACY.

It is the sense of Congress that—

  • (1) the Office of Victim Advocacy established under section 8C of the Peace Corps Act, as added by section 2, should provide an adequate number of victim advocates so that each victim of crime receives critical information and support;
  • (2) any full-time victim advocates and any additional victim advocates should be credentialed by a national victims assistance body; and
  • (3) the training required under section 8A(a) of the Peace Corps Act, as added by section 2, should be credentialed by a national victims assistance body.

SEC. 5. PERSONAL SERVICE CONTRACTS.

The Peace Corps Act is amended—

  • (1) in section 7(a)(3) (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)(3)), by inserting ‘‘, or contracted with for personal services under section 10(a)(5),’’ after ‘‘employed, appointed, or assigned under this subsection’’; and
  • (2) in section 10(a)(5) (22 U.S.C. 2509(a)(5)), by striking ‘‘any purpose’’ and inserting ‘‘the purposes of any law administered by the Office of Personnel Management (except that the President may determine the applicability to such individuals of provisions of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.))’’.

SEC. 6. INDEPENDENCE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE PEACE CORPS.

Section 7(a) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2506(a)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: ‘‘(7) The limitations specified in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (2) and in paragraph (5) shall not apply to—

  • ‘‘(A) the Inspector General of the Peace Corps; and
  • ‘‘(B) officers and employees of the Office of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps.’’.

SEC. 7. CONFORMING SAFETY AND SECURITY AGREEMENT REGARDING PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS SERVING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

  • (a) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Peace Corps shall consult with the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security and enter into a memorandum of understanding that specifies the S. 1280—10 duties and obligations of the Peace Corps and the Bureau of Diplomatic Security of the Department of State with respect to the protection of Peace Corps volunteers and staff members serving in foreign countries, including with respect to investigations of safety and security incidents and crimes committed against volunteers

and staff members.

  • (b) INSPECTOR GENERAL REVIEW.—
  • (1) REVIEW.—The Inspector General of the Peace Corps shall review the memorandum of understanding described in subsection (a) and be afforded the opportunity to recommend changes that advance the safety and security of Peace Corps volunteers before entry into force of the memorandum of understanding.
  • (2) REPORT.—The Director of the Peace Corps shall consider the recommendations of the Inspector General of the Peace Corps regarding the memorandum of understanding described in subsection (a). If the Director enters into the memorandum of understanding without implementing a recommendation of the Inspector General, the Director shall submit to the Inspector General a written explanation relating thereto.
  • (c) FAILURE TO MEET DEADLINE.—
  • (1) REQUIREMENT TO SUBMIT REPORT.—If, by the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Peace Corps is unable to obtain agreement with the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security and certification by the Inspector General of the Peace Corps, the Director shall submit to the committees of Congress specified in paragraph (2) a report explaining the reasons for such failure and a certification that substantial steps are being taken

to make progress toward agreement.

  • (2) COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS SPECIFIED.—The committees of Congress specified in this paragraph are the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on

Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 8. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

  • (a) INCLUSION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT RISK-REDUCTION AND RESPONSE TRAINING.—The Peace Corps Act is amended—
  • (1) in section 5(a) (22 U.S.C. 2504(a)), in the second sentence, by inserting ‘‘(including training under section 8A)’’ after ‘‘training’’; and
  • (2) in section 8(a) (22 U.S.C. 2507(a)), in the first sentence, by inserting ‘‘, including training under section 8A,’’ after‘‘training’’.
  • (b) CERTAIN SERVICES.—Section 5(e) of the Peace Corps Act(22 U.S.C. 2504(e)) is amended, in the first sentence—
  • (1) by inserting ‘‘(including, if necessary, for volunteers and trainees, services under section 8B)’’ after ‘‘health care’’;and
  • (2) by inserting ‘‘including services provided in accordance with section 8B (except that the six-month limitation shall not apply in the case of such services),’’ before ‘‘as the President’’.

SEC. 9. OFFSET OF COSTS AND PERSONNEL.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Direct of the Peace Corps shall— S. 1280—11

  • (1) eliminate such initiatives, positions, and programs within the Peace Corps (other than within the Office of Inspector General) as the Director deems necessary to ensure any and all costs incurred to carry out the provisions of this Act, and the amendments made by this Act, are entirely offset;
  • (2) ensure no net increase in personnel are added to carry out the provisions of this Act, with any new full or part time employees or equivalents offset by eliminating an equivalent number of existing staff (other than within the Office of Inspector General);
  • (3) report to Congress not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act the actions taken to ensure compliance with paragraphs (1) and (2), including the specific initiatives, positions, and programs within the Peace Corps that have been eliminated to ensure that the costs of carrying out this Act will be offset; and
  • (4) not implement any other provision of this Act (other than paragraphs (1), (2), and (3)) or any amendment made by this Act until the Director has certified that the actions specified in paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) have been completed.


Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate.

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