Difference between pages "Samoa" and "Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador"

From Peace Corps Wiki
(Difference between pages)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (1 revision imported)
 
m (added Diversity_and_cross-cultural_issues_by_country template)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{CountryboxAlternative
+
{{Diversity_and_cross-cultural_issues_by_country}}
|Countryname= Samoa
+
In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.  
|CountryCode = ws
 
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
 
|Flag= Flag_of_Samoa.svg
 
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/wswb491.pdf
 
|Region= [[Pacific Islands]]
 
|CountryDirector= [[Dale Withington]]
 
|Sectors= [[Education and Information and Communication Technology]] <br> [[Village-Based Development]] <br>
 
|ProgramDates= [[1967]] - [[Present]]
 
|CurrentlyServing= 51
 
|TotalVolunteers= 1,678
 
|Languages= [[Samoan]], [[English]]
 
|Map= Ws-map.gif
 
|stagingdate= Oct 6 2009
 
|stagingcity= Los Angeles
 
}}
 
  
Since 1967, over 1,600 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in Samoa, working in both
+
Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Ecuador, as in other Peace Corps countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Ecuador.  
urban and rural communities. Approximately 70% of the Volunteers have been teachers.
 
The remaining 30% have worked in agriculture, health, public works, youth
 
development, and the environment. More recently, Peace Corps' strategy has focused on
 
capacity building efforts in information and communications technology; teacher
 
training; and village-based assignments in agriculture, community development, and the
 
environment.
 
  
 +
Outside of Ecuador’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Ecuador are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
To ease the transition and adapt to life in Ecuador, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.
  
 +
===Overview of Diversity in Ecuador===
  
== ''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Samoa]]''
+
The Peace Corps staff in Ecuador recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture. There are a number of support groups in Ecuador, including a Peer Support Network of trained Volunteers in each region, that meet a few times a year to discuss and deal with challenges faced by specific groups.
  
In 1967, after experiencing a difficult year and a devastating cyclone, Samoa invited the Peace Corps. The first Volunteers worked in rural villages, leading health and hygiene projects for Samoa's Department of Health. These early Volunteers remain well-known for the introduction of water seal toilets, now affectionately called fale Pisikoa (Peace Corps houses).
+
===What Might a Volunteer Face? ===
  
The next groups to follow were civil engineers, architects, accountants, statisticians, and economic planners who served in various central government departments. One early Volunteer was the architect and construction supervisor for the present Parliament building at Mulinu’u and the supporting offices of the Legislative Assembly.
+
====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers====
  
Volunteers also had a significant impact on infrastructure development, such as the Faleolo International Airport terminal and school buildings. Some took up prominent, executive positions in various government departments, such as acting directors of Public Works.
+
Gender roles in Ecuador are markedly different from those in the United States. Most Ecuadorian women, especially those in rural areas, have traditional roles: They run the household, prepare meals, clean, and rear children. Many women also work in the fields, run small businesses, and care for farm animals. Men also have specific roles, and “manliness” is considered very important. Although many Volunteers are bothered by these gender roles, it is important to understand them to be effective in your work.  
  
In health care, Volunteers have served as researchers in filariasis control (filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a blood nematode), and they have worked at the National Hospital as nutrition educators and dietitians. Other Volunteers have worked as small business advisors and as youth development workers. ==
+
It is not uncommon for women to receive stares, comments, and offers of dates on the street or in other situations. Female Volunteers are obvious targets because they often look quite different from Ecuadorian women. Female Volunteers must learn how to handle these situations and sometimes have to accept constraints on their behavior that male Volunteers do not face.  
  
== '''Headline text'''[[Link title]] ==
+
Male Volunteers also encounter harassment, though less frequently. If you do not drink, smoke, or like to pursue women openly, you may be teased about not being manly enough and pressured to participate in these activities. Male Volunteers who cook, wash clothes and dishes, and clean the house may seem very strange to their neighbors.
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
All Volunteers have to adjust to the gender norms and different ways of doing things in Ecuador. Pre-service training will orient you to these norms and customs.
  
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Samoa]]''
+
====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color====
  
All Volunteers are provided with adequate and safe housing. As part of their contribution to having a Volunteer, host country agencies and/or communities must provide adequate housing.
+
Ecuador has a variety of ethnic groups, including an Afro-Ecuadorian population concentrated in a couple of areas of the country. Thus African-American Volunteers are likely to stand out more for their manner of dress and lifestyle than for their ethnic background, especially if they live in these particular areas. And since Afro-Ecuadorians are a visible minority subject to negative attitudes or discrimination, African-American Volunteers may experience similar treatment.  
  
Capacity-building Volunteers live in houses provided by the Samoan government or a local nongovernmental organization (NGO). Most Volunteers in Apia share a house with another Volunteer or, in some cases, a Samoan counterpart. All houses in and around Apia have electricity and running water. All houses in the urban area have indoor toilets and showers.
+
Volunteers of color may encounter verbal harassment on the street—especially when away from their sites in larger towns or cities. Asian Americans may be called chino or china even if they are not of Chinese descent. However, comments or jokes regarding race or ethnicity are more likely to be used in a descriptive sense than in a derogatory sense. Most of them arise from misinformation or unfamiliarity with other races and cultures rather than mean-spiritedness. You will find it helpful to maintain a positive attitude about yourself and to approach any negative comments with patience and confidence.  
  
Volunteers working in the village-based development project, either live in a room with a Samoan family or in a small house on a family compound. Volunteers in this project need to be prepared to live with or very close to a family for their entire two years of service. This is a requirement of working in the project. Most (but not all) villages have electricity. Most (but not all) villages have running water within the family compound, but not necessarily inside of the house.  
+
Ecuadorians (particularly in rural areas) tend to think of all Americans as Anglo. For Anglo-Americans who have had little experience with being the only one of their kind in a community, being the center of attention because of one’s nationality, regardless of race or ethnicity, may sometimes feel uncomfortable.
  
 +
====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers====
  
==Training==
+
In general, older members of the community are well respected in Ecuador. Specific challenges for senior Volunteers most often are related to language acquisition and adaptation to the relatively basic living conditions of Ecuador. 
  
''Main article: [[Training in Samoa]]''
+
====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers====
  
Pre-service training will provide you with the essential skills needed to successfully complete your Peace Corps service. The skills focus around integrating into your community and developing and implementing an appropriate work plan with your community and counterparts. Training includes six major components: technical training (covering life and work) and the role of the Volunteer in development, language training, cross-cultural training, health training, safety and security training, and diversity training.
+
While some Ecuadorians in larger cities are open about their sexual orientation, gay, lesbian, or bisexual Volunteers will have to be very circumspect with their Ecuadorian colleagues.  There are support mechanisms for gays and lesbians within the Peace Corps community, but not many in the broader society.
  
A community-based training model is the backbone of pre-service training for all new Volunteers in Samoa. This means that living and learning successfully in a local host community is an integral part of our training program. This is a more difficult training model in some respects, as the learning environment is real. During community-based training, most of your time will be spent in villages and communities similar to where you will be placed as a Volunteer. Your instructors will set up the learning environment with experiences and meetings designed to allow you to develop the knowledge and skills needed for your work as a Volunteer. Throughout your training, you will live with a Samoan family and work in villages and schools. Married couples will be housed together during training.
+
====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers====
  
 +
Roman Catholicism is the dominant religion in Ecuador. Other religious groups are increasingly visible, however, and tolerance of other religions is fairly high. In some smaller communities, divisions exist across religious lines, and Volunteers need to understand these and be careful about being seen as aligned exclusively with one side or the other. 
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
====Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities====
  
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Samoa]]''
+
As part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodations, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Ecuador without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. Peace Corps/Ecuador staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations in training, housing, job sites, and other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Samoa maintains a clinic with a full-time and a backup medical officer, who together take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Samoa at two local hospitals (one private, one public).
+
That being said, Ecuador is not generally an accessible country. Places that make accommodations for those with physical disabilities are generally restricted to small areas in the largest cities. The major cities, however, do offer a broad range of good healthcare for the disabled.
  
During your service, if you become seriously ill or in-country medical services cannot provide further medical treatment that you may urgently require, the medical officer in Samoa will consult with the Office of Medical Services in Washington, D.C. If it is determined that your condition cannot be treated in Samoa, you may be sent out of the country for further evaluation and care.
+
[[Category:Ecuador]]
 
 
 
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Samoa]]''
 
 
 
In Samoa, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics considered familiar and commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed here.
 
 
 
Outside of Samoa’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is viewed as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Samoa are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present. To ease the transition and adapt to life in Samoa, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions will need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limits. Although Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, the challenge will ultimately be your own.
 
 
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 
* Possible Issues for Married Volunteers
 
 
 
 
 
==Frequently Asked Questions==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Samoa]]''
 
 
 
* How much luggage will I be allowed to bring to Samoa?
 
* What is the electric current in Samoa?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
* What should I bring as gifts for Samoan friends and my host family?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
* Can I call home from Samoa?
 
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 
 
 
 
 
==Packing List==
 
 
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 
|H1r=  63
 
|H1s=  63.6
 
|H2r=  58
 
|H2s=  78.3
 
|H3r=  62
 
|H3s=  75.3
 
|H4r=  63
 
|H4s=  97
 
|H5r=  53
 
|H5s=  46.3
 
|H6r=  67
 
|H6s=  50.7
 
}}
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Packing List for Samoa]]''
 
 
 
There are some suggestions for packing, generated by Volunteers serving in Samoa. You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have items sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. As mentioned earlier, Volunteers who choose to go with the airline allowances over the Peace Corps allowances do so at their own risk and potential expense. Remember, less is often more, and you can get almost everything you need in Samoa. Use this list as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
 
 
 
Keep in mind also that what you bring probably will not make it back to the U.S., so don’t bring anything you would be heartbroken to lose.
 
 
 
* General Clothing
 
* For Women
 
* For Men
 
* Kitchen
 
* Electronics
 
* Miscellaneous
 
* Special Notes
 
* Care Package Considerations
 
 
 
==Peace Corps News==
 
 
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
 
 
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22samoa%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 
 
 
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/ws/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
 
 
 
==Country Fund==
 
 
 
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=491-CFD Samoa Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Samoa. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
 
 
 
==See also==
 
* [[List of resources for Samoa]]
 
* [[Volunteers who served in Samoa]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[Returned Peace Corps Volunteers Samoa]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 
 
 
==External links==
 
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ws.html Peace Corps Journals - Samoa]
 
 
 
[[Category:Samoa]] [[Category:The Pacific Islands]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 

Revision as of 22:16, 12 March 2009

Diversity and cross-cultural issues in [[{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with their host countries, Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]
See also:
[[Category:{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ecuador| |7}}]]

In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.

Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Ecuador, as in other Peace Corps countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Ecuador.

Outside of Ecuador’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Ecuador are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

To ease the transition and adapt to life in Ecuador, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.

Overview of Diversity in Ecuador

The Peace Corps staff in Ecuador recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture. There are a number of support groups in Ecuador, including a Peer Support Network of trained Volunteers in each region, that meet a few times a year to discuss and deal with challenges faced by specific groups.

What Might a Volunteer Face?

Possible Issues for Female Volunteers

Gender roles in Ecuador are markedly different from those in the United States. Most Ecuadorian women, especially those in rural areas, have traditional roles: They run the household, prepare meals, clean, and rear children. Many women also work in the fields, run small businesses, and care for farm animals. Men also have specific roles, and “manliness” is considered very important. Although many Volunteers are bothered by these gender roles, it is important to understand them to be effective in your work.

It is not uncommon for women to receive stares, comments, and offers of dates on the street or in other situations. Female Volunteers are obvious targets because they often look quite different from Ecuadorian women. Female Volunteers must learn how to handle these situations and sometimes have to accept constraints on their behavior that male Volunteers do not face.

Male Volunteers also encounter harassment, though less frequently. If you do not drink, smoke, or like to pursue women openly, you may be teased about not being manly enough and pressured to participate in these activities. Male Volunteers who cook, wash clothes and dishes, and clean the house may seem very strange to their neighbors.

All Volunteers have to adjust to the gender norms and different ways of doing things in Ecuador. Pre-service training will orient you to these norms and customs.

Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color

Ecuador has a variety of ethnic groups, including an Afro-Ecuadorian population concentrated in a couple of areas of the country. Thus African-American Volunteers are likely to stand out more for their manner of dress and lifestyle than for their ethnic background, especially if they live in these particular areas. And since Afro-Ecuadorians are a visible minority subject to negative attitudes or discrimination, African-American Volunteers may experience similar treatment.

Volunteers of color may encounter verbal harassment on the street—especially when away from their sites in larger towns or cities. Asian Americans may be called chino or china even if they are not of Chinese descent. However, comments or jokes regarding race or ethnicity are more likely to be used in a descriptive sense than in a derogatory sense. Most of them arise from misinformation or unfamiliarity with other races and cultures rather than mean-spiritedness. You will find it helpful to maintain a positive attitude about yourself and to approach any negative comments with patience and confidence.

Ecuadorians (particularly in rural areas) tend to think of all Americans as Anglo. For Anglo-Americans who have had little experience with being the only one of their kind in a community, being the center of attention because of one’s nationality, regardless of race or ethnicity, may sometimes feel uncomfortable.

Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers

In general, older members of the community are well respected in Ecuador. Specific challenges for senior Volunteers most often are related to language acquisition and adaptation to the relatively basic living conditions of Ecuador.

Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers

While some Ecuadorians in larger cities are open about their sexual orientation, gay, lesbian, or bisexual Volunteers will have to be very circumspect with their Ecuadorian colleagues. There are support mechanisms for gays and lesbians within the Peace Corps community, but not many in the broader society.

Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers

Roman Catholicism is the dominant religion in Ecuador. Other religious groups are increasingly visible, however, and tolerance of other religions is fairly high. In some smaller communities, divisions exist across religious lines, and Volunteers need to understand these and be careful about being seen as aligned exclusively with one side or the other.

Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities

As part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodations, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Ecuador without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. Peace Corps/Ecuador staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations in training, housing, job sites, and other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.

That being said, Ecuador is not generally an accessible country. Places that make accommodations for those with physical disabilities are generally restricted to small areas in the largest cities. The major cities, however, do offer a broad range of good healthcare for the disabled.