Difference between pages "Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Jamaica" and "Packing list for Armenia"

From Peace Corps Wiki
(Difference between pages)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (1 revision imported)
 
m (added Packing lists by country template)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Diversity_and_cross-cultural_issues_by_country}}
+
{{Packing lists by country}}
In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in its Volunteers.  More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is thoroughly American despite our many differences.
 
  
Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Jamaica, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Jamaica.
+
{{Countrybar
 +
|Countryname= Armenia
 +
}}
  
Outside of Jamaica’s capital and tourist towns, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Jamaica are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.  
  
To ease the transition and adapt to life in Jamaica, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.  
+
When choosing luggage, remember that you will be hauling it in and out of taxis and vans and sometimes lugging it around on foot. The most important qualities are that it be durable, lightweight, and easy to carry.  
  
===Overview of Diversity in Jamaica ===
+
===General Clothing ===
  
The Peace Corps staff in Jamaica recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations, and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.  
+
Although you can buy clothing in [[Armenia]], much of it is synthetic and it may not meet your tastes. Variety in clothing is not as important as how it looks. Bring sturdy clothes that will last a long time. You can have some clothes made locally, so it is a good idea to bring patterns or pictures of clothes you like. Be sure to pack a good supply of underwear; polypropylene, wool, and cotton socks and glove liners; and long underwear of different weights (e.g., wool and silk).  
  
===What Might a Volunteer Face? ===
+
===For Women===
  
The comments below are intended to stimulate thought and discussion. They come from Volunteers serving in many countries, so not all of the issues discussed may have an impact on your Volunteer experience. Rather, they are included here to make all Volunteers aware of issues that one particular group or another may face. As you read them, you might ask yourself, “How would I feel if that happened to me?”
+
* Dressy and casual clothing for winter and summer: skirts, dresses, blouses, knit tops, slacks, and jeans, including one formal outfit (skirts and dresses should fall below the knee)
 +
* At least two pairs of flat shoes, along with dressy sandals, tennis shoes, winter boots, and hiking boots if desired (quality is important)
 +
* Jewelry and makeup (women in Yerevan wear both, but they are not necessary)
 +
* Slips
 +
* Leggings
 +
* Shorts, for wearing at home or while jogging early in the morning (Armenian women do not wear shorts in public)
 +
* Warm coat, hats, and scarves
  
====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers ====
+
===For Men===
  
Female Volunteers find that women’s equality and independence are defined differently in Jamaica than in the United States, with different expectations for women’s roles.  In Jamaica, female Volunteers may be expected to have a husband, children, a boyfriend, or some combination of the three. They may be expected to “stay at home.” They may be proposed to on a daily basis or subjected to sexual advances or touching. Verbal harassment can be extremely crude.
+
* An assortment of winter and summer clothing, including collared shirts for work and at least one dressy outfit (sport coat, tie, dress shirt, and slacks); Volunteers suggest dark colors because they look clean longer than light colors
 +
* Shoes for work, tennis shoes, winter boots, sandals for summertime, and hiking boots if desired (quality is important)
 +
* Warm coat and wool hats and wool or ski-type gloves
 +
* Shorts, for wearing at home or sports (Armenian men do not usually wear shorts unless playing sports)
 +
 +
===Kitchen===
  
====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color ====
+
* Good can opener
 +
* Spices (your favorites may be difficult to locate, especially in winter)
 +
* Cooking supplies (many items can be found locally)
 +
* Basic cookbook
 +
* Plastic storage bags
 +
* Measuring cups and spoons
  
A person of color may be the only minority trainee or Volunteer within a particular project, and may work and live with individuals with no experience or understanding of his or her culture. They may not receive necessary personal support from white Volunteers or be questioned about socializing exclusively with other minority Volunteers. Assumed to be Jamaicans, African-American Volunteers may be accepted more readily into the culture than other Volunteers and treated according to local social norms. They may also be categorized according to local stereotypes concerning skin pigmentation, such as the view that those with lighter skin are smarter or more dependable. Another stereotype Jamaicans make is calling fair-skinned blacks “red” or “white” Jamaicans.
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items===
  
====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers ====
+
* Favorite over-the-counter medical supplies (items provided by the Peace Corps tend to be generic brands)
 +
* A three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take (to give the Peace Corps ample time to order them)
 +
* Two pairs of eyeglasses, if you wear them (replacements can take several months to arrive)
 +
* Contact lens supplies (not available locally and not supplied by the Peace Corps)
 +
* Towels, absorbent and of good quality
 +
* Hair-coloring products, if you prefer a certain brand
  
Seniors may find themselves treated with more respect than younger Volunteers and thus have different interactions with Jamaicans. They may find that younger Volunteers look to them for advice and support; some seniors find this a very enjoyable part of their Volunteer experience, while others choose not to fill this role.
+
===Miscellaneous===
  
====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers ====
+
* Watch (durable, water-resistant, and inexpensive); batteries can be purchased in Armenia
 +
* Travel alarm clock (battery operated is best)
 +
* Sunglasses, for dusty road travel and for winter and summer glare
 +
* Sturdy work gloves, especially if you like to garden
 +
* Poncho and folding umbrella
 +
* Fanny pack
 +
* Small daypack without a frame (for shopping and carrying books or work materials)
 +
* Camera (film and processing are available locally)
 +
* Voltage transformers and surge protectors (if you bring 110-volt appliances)
 +
* Variable voltage adapter, which switches the current from AC to DC and can reduce the need for battery replacements (also available in Yerevan electronics stores)
 +
* Flashlights (available in Armenia, but choices are limited) 83
 +
* Batteries (rechargeable ones are best)
 +
* CD or tape player/recorder and shortwave radio
 +
* Cassette tapes or CDs
 +
* One or two sets of double-size flat sheets (available locally)
 +
* Small tool kit (available locally)
 +
* Swiss Army knife or Leatherman tool
 +
* Sewing kit
 +
* Pictures and videocassette tapes of home (for yourself and to share with friends and students)
 +
* U.S. postage stamps (so that travelers going home can hand-carry mail for you)
 +
* U.S. and world maps which make good teaching aids and can serve as wall hangings
 +
* Inexpensive gifts (e.g., toys, costume jewelry, magazines, key chains, kitchen gadgets such as potato peelers)
 +
* Games (e.g., Scrabble, chess, Trivial Pursuit)
 +
* Sports equipment (e.g., Frisbee, baseball, volleyball)
 +
* Detergent for delicate fabrics (e.g., Woolite); dry cleaning is limited in Armenia
 +
* Sleeping bag rated for minus 10 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit and a pad (Volunteers also suggest a compactable bag and fleece liner)
 +
 +
===Work-Related Materials===
  
Homosexuality is generally not accepted in Jamaica’s culture, and local laws prohibit homosexual behavior. Revealing one’s sexual orientation could result in a violent verbal or physical attack, so it is safer to be discreet outside the Peace Corps family. Gay men may be referred to derogatively as “Batty Man,” “Batty Boy,” or “Chi-Chi Man.”
+
* English language tapes
 +
* Dictionary and thesaurus
 +
* Word games
 +
* Songbooks
 +
* Calendars with colorful pictures
 +
* Scissors
 +
* Small stapler with staples (available locally)
 +
* Tape measure (with inches and centimeters)
 +
* Novels and short stories (for yourself and your work)
  
See also the recent NYT article, [http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/24/world/americas/24jamaica.html?ex=1204520400&en=0efb2859ff93f162&ei=5070&emc=eta1 Attacks Show Easygoing Jamaica Is Dire Place for Gays]:
+
[[Category:Armenia]]
 
 
<blockquote>One night last month, Andre and some friends were finishing dinner when a mob showed up at the front gate. Yelling antigay slurs and waving machetes, sticks and knives, 15 to 20 men kicked in the front door of the home he and his friends had rented and set upon them. [...] "One time may be an isolated incident," said Rebecca Schleifer, a researcher for Human Rights Watch who has studied the issue and regularly gets calls from the island from gays under attack. "When they happen on a repeated basis across the country, it is an urgent problem that deserves attention at the highest levels."</blockquote>
 
 
 
====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers ====
 
 
 
Volunteers in Jamaica, a predominantly Christian nation, can expect many meetings to begin with a prayer. They should also be prepared to be criticized for not attending church.
 
 
 
====Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities ====
 
 
 
Volunteers with disabilities may not find many facilities that allow easy access. They should be prepared for encountering unsolicited attention, fear or lack of knowledge regarding persons with disabilities, or lack of empathy or support.
 
 
 
Nevertheless, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services, as part of the medical clearance process, determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodations, of performing a full tour of Volunteer service in Jamaica without unreasonable risk to yourself or interruption of your service. The Peace Corps/ Jamaica staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations in training, housing, job sites, and other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.rasdafd=-jokah-t0jkd-safo-kt-syodjfp-sdghfsghi-bjo0-vfbs-gh0adkof-sdhokvf[pshod[vp-skdgvfopsoivsopadohih
 
 
 
====Possible Issues for Married Volunteers ====
 
 
 
There may be differences in job satisfaction and/or different needs. Younger Volunteers may look to couples for advice and support. Married couples are likely to be treated with more respect because the community sees marriage as a responsibility; and you may be asked why you do not have children.
 
 
 
[[Category:Jamaica]]
 

Revision as of 22:50, 12 March 2009


Packing List for [[{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]

Packing Lists by Country

These lists has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]] based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
[[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}}|}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}|}}.svg|50px|none]]

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category:{{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Armenia| |5}}]]
Armenia Articles | History of Peace Corps in Armenia | Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia | Training in Armenia | Health care and safety in Armenia | Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia | Packing List for Armenia | Pre Departure Checklist for Armenia | Books | FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia | Web Resources | Armenia volunteers | Armenia Volunteer Site Postings

This list has been compiled by Volunteers and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.

When choosing luggage, remember that you will be hauling it in and out of taxis and vans and sometimes lugging it around on foot. The most important qualities are that it be durable, lightweight, and easy to carry.

General Clothing

Although you can buy clothing in Armenia, much of it is synthetic and it may not meet your tastes. Variety in clothing is not as important as how it looks. Bring sturdy clothes that will last a long time. You can have some clothes made locally, so it is a good idea to bring patterns or pictures of clothes you like. Be sure to pack a good supply of underwear; polypropylene, wool, and cotton socks and glove liners; and long underwear of different weights (e.g., wool and silk).

For Women

  • Dressy and casual clothing for winter and summer: skirts, dresses, blouses, knit tops, slacks, and jeans, including one formal outfit (skirts and dresses should fall below the knee)
  • At least two pairs of flat shoes, along with dressy sandals, tennis shoes, winter boots, and hiking boots if desired (quality is important)
  • Jewelry and makeup (women in Yerevan wear both, but they are not necessary)
  • Slips
  • Leggings
  • Shorts, for wearing at home or while jogging early in the morning (Armenian women do not wear shorts in public)
  • Warm coat, hats, and scarves

For Men

  • An assortment of winter and summer clothing, including collared shirts for work and at least one dressy outfit (sport coat, tie, dress shirt, and slacks); Volunteers suggest dark colors because they look clean longer than light colors
  • Shoes for work, tennis shoes, winter boots, sandals for summertime, and hiking boots if desired (quality is important)
  • Warm coat and wool hats and wool or ski-type gloves
  • Shorts, for wearing at home or sports (Armenian men do not usually wear shorts unless playing sports)

Kitchen

  • Good can opener
  • Spices (your favorites may be difficult to locate, especially in winter)
  • Cooking supplies (many items can be found locally)
  • Basic cookbook
  • Plastic storage bags
  • Measuring cups and spoons

Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

  • Favorite over-the-counter medical supplies (items provided by the Peace Corps tend to be generic brands)
  • A three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take (to give the Peace Corps ample time to order them)
  • Two pairs of eyeglasses, if you wear them (replacements can take several months to arrive)
  • Contact lens supplies (not available locally and not supplied by the Peace Corps)
  • Towels, absorbent and of good quality
  • Hair-coloring products, if you prefer a certain brand

Miscellaneous

  • Watch (durable, water-resistant, and inexpensive); batteries can be purchased in Armenia
  • Travel alarm clock (battery operated is best)
  • Sunglasses, for dusty road travel and for winter and summer glare
  • Sturdy work gloves, especially if you like to garden
  • Poncho and folding umbrella
  • Fanny pack
  • Small daypack without a frame (for shopping and carrying books or work materials)
  • Camera (film and processing are available locally)
  • Voltage transformers and surge protectors (if you bring 110-volt appliances)
  • Variable voltage adapter, which switches the current from AC to DC and can reduce the need for battery replacements (also available in Yerevan electronics stores)
  • Flashlights (available in Armenia, but choices are limited) 83
  • Batteries (rechargeable ones are best)
  • CD or tape player/recorder and shortwave radio
  • Cassette tapes or CDs
  • One or two sets of double-size flat sheets (available locally)
  • Small tool kit (available locally)
  • Swiss Army knife or Leatherman tool
  • Sewing kit
  • Pictures and videocassette tapes of home (for yourself and to share with friends and students)
  • U.S. postage stamps (so that travelers going home can hand-carry mail for you)
  • U.S. and world maps which make good teaching aids and can serve as wall hangings
  • Inexpensive gifts (e.g., toys, costume jewelry, magazines, key chains, kitchen gadgets such as potato peelers)
  • Games (e.g., Scrabble, chess, Trivial Pursuit)
  • Sports equipment (e.g., Frisbee, baseball, volleyball)
  • Detergent for delicate fabrics (e.g., Woolite); dry cleaning is limited in Armenia
  • Sleeping bag rated for minus 10 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit and a pad (Volunteers also suggest a compactable bag and fleece liner)

Work-Related Materials

  • English language tapes
  • Dictionary and thesaurus
  • Word games
  • Songbooks
  • Calendars with colorful pictures
  • Scissors
  • Small stapler with staples (available locally)
  • Tape measure (with inches and centimeters)
  • Novels and short stories (for yourself and your work)