Difference between pages "Teacher's Corner" and "Training in Rwanda"

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The purpose of the education project plan:
+
{{Training_by_country}}
  
'''''Students will realize their optimum potential by participating in innovative and gender-sensitive educational opportunities in the classroom and community.'''''
+
===Overview of Pre-Service Training===
 
'''General Teaching Approach'''
 
  
In planning your lessons, you should consider a wide range of variables including teaching techniques. In most classrooms the teacher relies heavily on traditional methods like lecture, recitation from the textbook and rote repetition. These are classified as ''teacher-centered'' instruction because they are based on a model of the teacher as the holder of and transmitter of knowledge and the students as passive receivers of that knowledge. Quite recently however, this model is being abandoned in favor of a ''student-centered'' approach. The student-centered model includes a variety of techniques aimed at active student participation and experiential learning. '''Often the teacher acts as a guide or facilitator for the activity.''' Some of these techniques include:
+
The most important function of Peace Corps staff is to
*small groups
+
provide support for Volunteers. Support does not imply
*brainstorming
+
daily supervision of Volunteers’ work, nor does it imply
*role play
+
assuming parental roles. Volunteer support implies an
*games
+
ongoing interaction between Volunteers and all Peace Corps
*simulations
+
staff regarding how you handle such matters as your overall
*individualized learning
+
adjustment to the Peace Corps, your job assignment, and your
*student presentations
+
community. Your Peace Corps staff is responsible for making
*dramatic activities
+
regular visits to your site to assist you in any way possible in
The classroom is rarely totally teacher- or student-centered, but somewhere on a continuum between these two models. We would want to encourage you to use the student-centered approach more, hence the discussion of that method into greater detail than the teacher-centered.
+
your orientation in-country.
  
- from Education APCDs Joe Bee and Mary
+
Training will be busy for everyone. Often you will work over
+
eight hours a day, five or six days a week. Be prepared for a
 +
rigorous, full schedule. The principal objectives of training
 +
are to provide a learning environment that enables you to
 +
develop the language (Kinyarwanda), technical and cultural
 +
skills, knowledge, and attitude necessary to work and live in
 +
Rwanda.
  
[[File:PCV Teacher's Manual 2004.doc | '''Peace Corps Volunteer Teacher's Manual 2004''']]
+
Your training will be a mixture of classroom instruction and
 +
training in the community, where you will learn by doing and
 +
then reflect on your experiences during formal sessions. You
 +
will spend time in the field, completing hands-on, practical
 +
tasks and participating in group discussions, lectures, and
 +
field trips. Each week you will spend time discussing what you
 +
learned the previous week, preparing for the next work week,
 +
and attending essential cross-cultural, health, administrative,
 +
and integration sessions.
  
+
Most of the training staff will be Rwandan nationals.
  
+
====Technical Training====
==Junior High School - Goal 1==
 
  
===Objective 1.1===
+
Technical training prepares you to work in Rwanda by building
+
on the skills you already have and helping you to develop new
'''Improve students performance using learner centered methods.'''
+
skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country.
 +
The Peace Corps staff, Rwandan experts, and expatriate
 +
consultants conduct the training program. Training places great
 +
emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the
 +
community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.
  
*You may also coach some of the top students to prepare and teach some lessons in your class. Remember students sometimes understand their fellow students better. This also helps the top students because one learns more by teaching another person. (Joe Bee and Mary)
+
Technical training will include sessions on the general
 +
environmental, economic, and political conditions in Rwanda
 +
and strategies for working within such a framework. You will
 +
review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the
 +
Rwandan agencies and organizations that invited the Peace
 +
Corps to assist them.
  
===Objective 1.2===
+
You will be supported and evaluated by the training staff
 +
throughout the training to build the confidence and skills
 +
you will need to undertake your project activities and to be a
 +
productive member of your community.
  
'''Building teaching teams and improving their methods.'''
+
====Language Training====
  
*Groups need not always engage in the same activity. The teacher can structure groups according to ability, needs, specific skills, or interests. Groups can be assigned special activities and the teachers can devote time to specific student needs and interests which would be impossible to address with the whole class. While the teacher is working with one group, other groups might be working on a group project, playing a game, solving a proble, or working on individual projects. For debates and contests, the class can split into two groups. If these groups are still too large for student interaction, try more groups. For discussion and projects, five or six students per group usually is an ideal number, but this depends on both the activity and the students.
+
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills
 +
are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during
 +
your service. These skills are critical to your job performance,
 +
they help you integrate into your host community, and they
 +
can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings.
 +
Therefore, language training is the heart of the training
 +
program, and you must successfully meet minimum language
 +
requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.
 +
Experienced Rwandan language instructors give formal
 +
language classes in small classes of four to five people. The
 +
national language, Kinyarwanda, will also be introduced in the
 +
health, culture, and technical components of training.
  
*One way of organizing these these groups is to give each student a role in the group: discussion leader, recorder, timekeeper, reporter and process observer. Following discussion the class regroups, and the reporter from each group makes a short summary of his/her group's conclusions. Pairs especially suitable for language practice, mini-debates in social studies and english, and peer quizzing in any subject area. (Joe Bee and Mary)
+
Your language training will incorporate a community-based
 +
approach. You will have classroom time and will be given
 +
assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with
 +
your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic
 +
social communication skills so you can develop language skills
 +
more thoroughly once you are at your site. Prior to swearing
 +
in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue
 +
language studies during your two years of service.
  
===Objective 1.3===
+
====Cross-Cultural Training====
  
'''Improve the school and classroom environment.'''
+
Cross-cultural and community development will be covered
 +
to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and
 +
facilitation. Topics such as community mobilization, conflict
 +
resolution, gender and development, and traditional and
 +
political structures are also addressed.
  
*You may use the well behaved students as your teaching assistants to assist you in maintaining class discipline. Be sure the Assistant does not use the position to bully his/her mates. Sometimes you can use the poorly behaved students after some coaching and talking to them and making sure the students have really had a change of behavior. (Joe Bee and Mary)
+
====Health Training====
*Be consistent with actions you take in the class and your everyday life in the school. Don't treat individuals or group of students different from others. (Joe Bee and Mary)
 
 
===Objective 1.4===
 
  
'''Extending education to the community.'''
+
During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical
 +
training and information. You are expected to practice
 +
preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own
 +
health by adhering to all medical policies. The topics include
 +
preventive health measures and minor and major medical
 +
issues that Volunteers may encounter while in Rwanda.
 +
Nutrition, mental health, setting up a safe living compound,
 +
and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.
  
*''I'm coming.''
+
====Safety Training====
  
===JHS Syllabi and Sample Tests===
+
During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt
 +
a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during
 +
your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies
 +
for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual
 +
responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
  
*''I'm comiing.''
+
====Additional Training During Volunteer Service====
 +
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the
 +
Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides
 +
trainees and Volunteers with continual opportunities to
 +
examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while
 +
increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During
 +
your service, there are usually three training events. The titles
 +
and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
  
==Goal 2 - Senior High School==
+
* In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
 +
* Midterm conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
 +
* Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.
  
'''The objectives for senior high school are the same as junior high school.'''
+
The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted
 +
to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the
 +
training system is that training events are integrated and
 +
interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through
 +
the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and
 +
evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps
 +
staff, and Volunteers.
  
===SHS Syllabi and Sample Tests===
 
  
*''I'm coming.''
 
  
==Goal 3 - Teacher Training College==
 
  
+
See also: [[Rwanda]]
===Objective 3.1===
 
 
 
'''Train teachers in ICT.'''
 
 
 
*''I'm coming.''
 
 
===Objective 3.2===
 
 
 
'''Promoting the use of ICT tools in teaching.'''
 
 
 
*''I'm coming.''
 
 
===Objective 3.3===
 
 
 
'''Providing support to teachers during their practicuum year.'''
 
 
 
*''I'm coming.''
 
 
 
===Objective 3.4===
 
 
 
'''Promoting and forming teach support groups and clubs.'''
 
 
 
*''I'm coming.''
 
 
===ICT Syllabi===
 
 
 
'''There is no official teacher training college syllabus for ICT.
 
 
 
*''I'm coming with an impromtu syllabus created by a PCV.''
 
 
 
===Past Cape Coast Tests===
 
*'''2006'''
 
**[[media:GNS 222 y2 s2 JUNE 2006 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year]]
 
 
 
*'''2007'''
 
**[[media:GNS 111S s2 20072008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Diploma in Basic Education of First Year (Sandwich)(1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 111S Sept 13 2007 answers.pdf|Two-Year Diploma in Basic Education of First Year(Sandwich)(2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y1 s2 OCT 2 2007 Answers.pdf|Three-Year Post-Secondary in Basic Education of First Year]]
 
**[[media:3yr july 3 2007 answers.pdf|Three-Year Post-Secondary in Basic Education of Second Year (1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y2 s1 Feb 6 2007 Answers.pdf|Three-Year Post-Secondary in Basic Education of Second Year (2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 211 y2 s1 Sep 24 2007 answers.pdf|Three-Year Post-Secondary in Basic Eduation of Second Year (3)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y2 s2 OCT 2 2007 Answers.pdf|Three-Year Post Secondary in Basic Education of Second Year (4)]]
 
 
 
*'''2008'''
 
**[[media:GNS 111S Jan 10 2008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for First Year(Sandwich)(1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 112S April 29 2008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for First Year (Sandwich)(2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 112S Aug 12 2008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for First Year (Sandwich)(3)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 211S y2 s1 DEC 28 2008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for Second Year (Sandwich)(1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 211S y2 s1 SEP 2008 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for Second Year (Sandwich)(2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 jan 2008 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year (1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y2 S1 Sept 16 2008 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year (2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y2 s2 sep 23 2008 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year (3)]]
 
 
 
*'''2009'''
 
**[[media:GNS 111S Sept 3 2009 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for First Year(Sandwich)(1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 111S Sept 9 2009 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for First Year(Sandwich)(2)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 212S y2 s2 May 2009 answers.pdf|Two-Year Basic Education for Second Year(Sandwich)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 211 y2 s1r sept 22 2009 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year]]
 
 
 
*'''2010'''
 
**[[media:GNS 211 y2 s1 Jan 07 2010 answers.pdf|Untrained Teachers in Basic Education for Fourth Year]]
 
**[[media:GNS 211 y2 s1 Feb 02 2010 answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year (1)]]
 
**[[media:GNS 221 y2 s2 July 6 2010 - Answers.pdf|Three-Year Basic Education for Second Year(2)]]
 
 
 
==Goal 4 - District Education Offices==
 
 
 
'''''This goal as yet to come to fruition.'''''
 
 
 
'''Objective 4.1'''
 
 
 
Improving computer literacy amongst district GES staff.
 
 
 
'''Objective 4.2'''
 
 
 
Improving computer literacy amongst school staff.
 
 
 
'''Objective 4.3'''
 
 
 
Promoting of ICT tools in teachig at the district level.
 
 
 
 
==Subject-specific Applications==
 
 
 
*''I'm coming.''
 
 
 
 
==School Clubs==
 
 
 
 
Check out these school club ideas to come up with one of your own.
 
 
 
*[[Business Camp]]
 
*[[Cultural Club]]
 
*[[Environment Club]]
 
*[[Health Club]]
 
*[[HIV/AIDS Educational Murals]]
 
*[[Reading Clubs]]
 
 
 
[[Ghana|Ghana Homepage]]
 
[[Category:Ghana]]
 

Latest revision as of 12:18, 23 August 2016


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Rwanda| |4}}]]


Overview of Pre-Service Training

The most important function of Peace Corps staff is to provide support for Volunteers. Support does not imply daily supervision of Volunteers’ work, nor does it imply assuming parental roles. Volunteer support implies an ongoing interaction between Volunteers and all Peace Corps staff regarding how you handle such matters as your overall adjustment to the Peace Corps, your job assignment, and your community. Your Peace Corps staff is responsible for making regular visits to your site to assist you in any way possible in your orientation in-country.

Training will be busy for everyone. Often you will work over eight hours a day, five or six days a week. Be prepared for a rigorous, full schedule. The principal objectives of training are to provide a learning environment that enables you to develop the language (Kinyarwanda), technical and cultural skills, knowledge, and attitude necessary to work and live in Rwanda.

Your training will be a mixture of classroom instruction and training in the community, where you will learn by doing and then reflect on your experiences during formal sessions. You will spend time in the field, completing hands-on, practical tasks and participating in group discussions, lectures, and field trips. Each week you will spend time discussing what you learned the previous week, preparing for the next work week, and attending essential cross-cultural, health, administrative, and integration sessions.

Most of the training staff will be Rwandan nationals.

Technical Training

Technical training prepares you to work in Rwanda by building on the skills you already have and helping you to develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. The Peace Corps staff, Rwandan experts, and expatriate consultants conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the general environmental, economic, and political conditions in Rwanda and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Rwandan agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them.

You will be supported and evaluated by the training staff throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you will need to undertake your project activities and to be a productive member of your community.

Language Training

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer. Experienced Rwandan language instructors give formal language classes in small classes of four to five people. The national language, Kinyarwanda, will also be introduced in the health, culture, and technical components of training.

Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. You will have classroom time and will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so you can develop language skills more thoroughly once you are at your site. Prior to swearing in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.

Cross-Cultural Training

Cross-cultural and community development will be covered to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and facilitation. Topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, and traditional and political structures are also addressed.

Health Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You are expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that Volunteers may encounter while in Rwanda. Nutrition, mental health, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.

Safety Training

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Training During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides trainees and Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:

  • In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
  • Midterm conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
  • Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.

The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.



See also: Rwanda