Difference between pages "Training in Moldova" and "List of resources for Panama"

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{{Training_by_country}}
 
Pre-service training begins the day you arrive in Moldova, lasts for about 10 weeks, and ends when you are sworn in as a Volunteer. The days are full with plenty to accomplish, so training is nothing like summer camp.
 
  
Peace Corps/Moldova uses a community-based training approach. Trainees live in small villages with five or six other trainees from their project area. Language classes occur daily, and afternoons are usually devoted to self-directed activities and homework assignments. Once a week, trainees in each project area meet together at a cluster site for technical sessions. Also once a week, all trainees come to a central hub for administrative, medical, and other special sessions.  
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Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Panama and to connect you to returned Volunteers. Please keep in mind that although we try to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it.  
  
The structure of Moldova’s pre-service training requires married couples to live apart in different villages during training. While this may seem like an obstacle for some, most married couples have actually found the arrangement to be beneficial because it allows them to focus on their own training needs and to develop a degree of independence they would otherwise not experience. Couples see each other at the central hub and are free to stay together with their respective host families on weekends and other times that work with the schedule of training activities.  
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A note of caution: As you surf the Internet, be aware that you may find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to express opinions about the Peace Corps based on their own experiences, including comments by those who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps.  These opinions are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S. government, and we hope you will keep in mind that no two people experience their service in the same way.  
  
Assessment criteria, which you will be informed of early in pre-service training, will help measure your progress toward acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to live and work effectively in Moldova. Certain competencies are set for each of the training components (language, health and safety, cross-cultural, and technical). You will have periodic interviews with staff during training to discuss your progress in gaining these competencies and, if necessary, develop a plan of action for improvement. Failure to gain the competencies may prevent you from becoming a Volunteer.
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===General Information About Panama ===
  
The members of the training staff are Moldovan, and most of them have worked with the Peace Corps for several years. They are a valuable resource for getting to know the Moldovan culture and language, and you can and should rely on them for advice and support.  
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http://www.countrywatch.com <br>
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On this site, you can learn anything from what time it is in Panama City to the populations of Panama’s largest cities. Just click on Panama and go from there.  
  
===Technical Training ===
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http://www.lonelyplanet.com  <br>
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Visit this site for general travel advice about almost any country in the world.
  
Technical training will prepare you to work in Moldova by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. The Peace Corps staff, Moldovan experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.  
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http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn  <br>
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This is the U.S. State Department’s website, which issues background notes periodically about countries around the world. Find Panama and learn more about its social and political history.  
  
Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Moldova and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Moldovan agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.  
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http://www.psr.keele.ac.uk/official.htm  <br>
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This site includes links to all the official sites for governments worldwide.  
  
===Language Training ===
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http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm  <br>
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This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information about countries around the world. Each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political backgrounds.
  
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundingsTherefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.  Experienced Moldovan language instructors teach formal language classes four or five days a week in small groups of four to six people. Most trainees will study Romanian as their primary language, but a few will study Russian.  
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http://www.un.org/pubs/cyberschoolbus/infonation3/menu/advanced.asp <br>
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This United Nations site allows you to search for statistical information for member states of the U.N.  
  
Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.  
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http://www.worldinformation.com  <br>
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This site provides an additional source of current and historical information about countries around the world.  
  
===Cross-Cultural Training ===
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===Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees===  
  
As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Moldovan host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families participate in an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Moldova. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.  
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http://www.rpcv.org  <br>
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This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, composed of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who Peace Corps served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local Volunteer activities. Or go straight to the Peace Corps Panama Friends site:
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http://www.panamapcv.net  <br>
  
Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures. You will also have opportunities to take field trips to historic sites and to learn traditional songs and dances.  
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http://www.panamapcv.net  <br>
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A returned Peace Corps Panama volunteer alumni organization composed primarily of Peace Corps Volunteers and Staff who served in Panama.  As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, our purpose is to help our members continue their commitment to international service and understanding, support the Peace Corps mission in Panama, and share knowledge of Panama and the Peace Corps with others. <br>
  
===Health Training ===
 
  
During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Moldova. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STIs are also covered.  
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http://www.rpcvwebring.org  <br>
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This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.  
  
===Safety Training ===
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http://www.peacecorpswriters.org  <br>
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This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers.  It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts from countries around the world.
  
During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
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===Online Articles/Current News Sites about Panama ===
  
===Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service ===
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http://www.thepanamanews.com  <br>
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The Panama News is an online newspaper (in English)
  
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to strengthen their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are several types of training events. These include:
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http://www.latinnews.com  <br>
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Website for Latin American Newsletters, which provides economic and political information on Latin America (in English)
  
* In-Service Trainings (ISTs): Provide an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months. Throughout the first year of service you will be provided with a number of in-service trainings including Technical ISTs, Language ISTs, and Language Weekends. The in-service trainings vary in length from 1.5 days to 4 days.  
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http://www.countryreports.org/history/patoc.aspx?countryid=189&countryName=Panama  <br>
* All Volunteer Conference: An annual conference organized with the participation of Volunteers from all sectors and including health and safety sessions as well as cross-sectoral technical training and activities.
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Website providing details on Panama history.  
* Close-of-Service Conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.  
 
  
The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
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http://www.panamainfo.com  <br>
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A guide to tourism, business, and life in Panama
  
[[Category:Moldova]]
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http://www.panamacybernews.com/
[[Category:Training|Moldova]]
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An online publication with news and pictures about Panama
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===International Development Sites about Panama ===
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http://www.usaid.gov/locations/latin_america_caribbean/  <br>
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U.S. Agency for International Development’s work in Latin America and the Caribbean
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http://www.undp.org.pa/pnudpanama/  <br>
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United Nations Development Programme (Spanish)
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http://www.ifad.org  <br>
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International Fund for Agricultural Development
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http://www.imf.org/external/country/PAN  <br>
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International Monetary Fund
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 +
===Recommended Books about Panama ===
 +
 
 +
# Labrut, Michele. Getting to Know Panama. El Dorado, Republic of Panama: Focus Publications, 1997.
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# McCullough, David. The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal: 1870-1914. NY: Simon & Schuster, 2004.
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# St. Regis, Louis. Lonely Planet Panama. Footscray, Victoria; London: Lonely Planet Publications, 2004.
 +
# Woodward, Bob. The Commanders. NY: Simon & Schuster, 2002. 
 +
 
 +
===Books About the History of the Peace Corps ===
 +
 
 +
# Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
 +
# Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985. Peace Corps
 +
# Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.
 +
 
 +
===Books on the Volunteer Experience ===
 +
 
 +
# Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
 +
# Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
 +
# Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003.
 +
# Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
 +
# Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
 +
# Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Panama]]

Latest revision as of 13:22, 23 August 2016

Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Panama and to connect you to returned Volunteers. Please keep in mind that although we try to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it.

A note of caution: As you surf the Internet, be aware that you may find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to express opinions about the Peace Corps based on their own experiences, including comments by those who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. These opinions are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S. government, and we hope you will keep in mind that no two people experience their service in the same way.

General Information About Panama

http://www.countrywatch.com
On this site, you can learn anything from what time it is in Panama City to the populations of Panama’s largest cities. Just click on Panama and go from there.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com
Visit this site for general travel advice about almost any country in the world.

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn
This is the U.S. State Department’s website, which issues background notes periodically about countries around the world. Find Panama and learn more about its social and political history.

http://www.psr.keele.ac.uk/official.htm
This site includes links to all the official sites for governments worldwide.

http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm
This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information about countries around the world. Each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political backgrounds.

http://www.un.org/pubs/cyberschoolbus/infonation3/menu/advanced.asp
This United Nations site allows you to search for statistical information for member states of the U.N.

http://www.worldinformation.com
This site provides an additional source of current and historical information about countries around the world.

Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees

http://www.rpcv.org
This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, composed of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who Peace Corps served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local Volunteer activities. Or go straight to the Peace Corps Panama Friends site: http://www.panamapcv.net

http://www.panamapcv.net
A returned Peace Corps Panama volunteer alumni organization composed primarily of Peace Corps Volunteers and Staff who served in Panama. As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, our purpose is to help our members continue their commitment to international service and understanding, support the Peace Corps mission in Panama, and share knowledge of Panama and the Peace Corps with others.


http://www.rpcvwebring.org
This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.

http://www.peacecorpswriters.org
This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers. It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts from countries around the world.

Online Articles/Current News Sites about Panama

http://www.thepanamanews.com
The Panama News is an online newspaper (in English)

http://www.latinnews.com
Website for Latin American Newsletters, which provides economic and political information on Latin America (in English)

http://www.countryreports.org/history/patoc.aspx?countryid=189&countryName=Panama
Website providing details on Panama history.

http://www.panamainfo.com
A guide to tourism, business, and life in Panama

http://www.panamacybernews.com/ An online publication with news and pictures about Panama

International Development Sites about Panama

http://www.usaid.gov/locations/latin_america_caribbean/
U.S. Agency for International Development’s work in Latin America and the Caribbean

http://www.undp.org.pa/pnudpanama/
United Nations Development Programme (Spanish)

http://www.ifad.org
International Fund for Agricultural Development

http://www.imf.org/external/country/PAN
International Monetary Fund

Recommended Books about Panama

  1. Labrut, Michele. Getting to Know Panama. El Dorado, Republic of Panama: Focus Publications, 1997.
  2. McCullough, David. The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal: 1870-1914. NY: Simon & Schuster, 2004.
  3. St. Regis, Louis. Lonely Planet Panama. Footscray, Victoria; London: Lonely Planet Publications, 2004.
  4. Woodward, Bob. The Commanders. NY: Simon & Schuster, 2002.

Books About the History of the Peace Corps

  1. Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
  2. Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985. Peace Corps
  3. Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.

Books on the Volunteer Experience

  1. Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
  2. Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
  3. Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003.
  4. Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
  5. Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
  6. Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).