Volunteers who served in Ecuador

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(Omnibus 72 (arrived 1994))
(Possible Issues for Volunteers with Disabilities)
 
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{{Diversity_and_cross-cultural_issues_by_country}}
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In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with our host countries, we are making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years.  Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race, and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other, despite our many differences. Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal.
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In other ways, however, our diversity poses challenges. In Togo, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics considered familiar and commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed.
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==1962==
+
Outside of Togo’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is advertised as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may also be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blonde hair and blue eyes. The people of Togo are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present. We will ask you to be supportive of one another, and encourage you to share American diversity with the Togolese.
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[[Earle Brooks]]<br>
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[[Rhoda Brooks]]<br>
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[[Diane Claerbout]]<br>
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[[Phyllis Greenberg Houseman]]<br>
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[[Stan Laser]]<br>
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[[Vera Alma Preston-Jaeger]]
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==1963==
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In order to ease the transition and adapt to life in Togo, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises with who you are as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions will need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limits. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.  
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[[James D. Cook]]<br>
+
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[[John Kostishack]]<br>
+
-
[[Robert N. Mowbray]]<br>
+
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[[Noble R. Wiltshire Jr.]]
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==1964==
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Historically, the Peace Corps and the Togolese people have benefited from the skills and experiences that persons from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds have offered. Volunteers from various backgrounds, all qualified ages, and both genders have served and benefited from their time in Togo. Your experiences in Togo will differ, to some degree, from every other Volunteer’s, both in terms of the challenges and rewards. Togolese are, in general, wonderfully generous, warm, and hospitable people and no matter who you are, if you make the effort necessary to transcend cultural barriers, you will have a rewarding and fruitful stay in Togo.  
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[[Jack R. Amon]]<br>
+
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[[Ralph Archung]]<br>
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[[Terance O. Bott]]<br>
+
-
[[Loren Finnell]]<br>
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[[Bernard J. Fisken]]<br>
+
-
[[Ron Herrgesell]]<br>
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-
[[Richard L. Kelsey]]<br>
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[[Dennis H. Knight]]<br>
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-
[[Gary F. Richardson]]<br>
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-
[[Fran Ruddick]]<br>
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[[Kathleen Mossman Vitale]]<br>
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-
[[Paul Vitale]]<br>
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[[Thomas J. Wegs]]
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==1965==
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===Overview of Diversity in Togo ===
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[[John D. Erickson]]<br>
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[[John Fisher]]<br>
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[[Barbara Hunter Whitfill]]<br>
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-
[[Moritz Thomsen]]<br>
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[[Ronald Wallace Gould]]
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==1966==
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The Peace Corps staff in Togo recognizes adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be facilitated by the Volunteer-initiated and led diversity committee to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of cultures, backgrounds, religions, ethnic groups, and ages and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who will take pride in supporting each other and demonstrating the richness of American culture.  
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[[Karen Allison]]<br>
+
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[[Lewis R Applegate]]<br>
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[[Barbara (Bean) Browne]]<br>
+
-
[[Hugh Graham]]<br>
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-
[[James Hoffman]]<br>
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-
[[Daryl E. Noll]]<br>
+
-
[[Thomas E. Roberts]]<br>
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-
[[Kay Harshbarger Wetherwax]]
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-
==1967==
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===What Might A Volunteer Face? ===
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[[Philipp Auer]]<br>
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[[Ben Binder]]<br>
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-
[[Charles Browne]]<br>
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-
[[James Owen Collins]]<br>
+
-
[[Hubert J. Dufner]]<br>
+
-
[[Douglas L Gilbert]]<br>
+
-
[[William D. Guzman]]<br>
+
-
[[Regina Harrison (formerly Macdonald)]]<br>
+
-
[[Alan Kurtz]]<br>
+
-
[[Charles Senseman]]<br>
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-
[[Philip E. Tack]]<br>
+
-
[[Greg Groppenbacher]]<br>
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-
[[Deidra Groppenbacher]]
+
-
==1968==
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====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers ====
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[[David J. Andrews]]<br>
+
-
[[Chuck Creesy]]<br>
+
-
[[Chuck Lippi]]<br>
+
-
[[James P. McLaughlin]]<br>
+
-
[[Larry Parrott]]<br>
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-
[[Jerry A. Payne]]<br>
+
-
[[John Perkins]]<br>
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-
[[Paul Robillard]]
+
-
==1969==
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Americans working in Togo face cultural adjustments in understanding and addressing prejudices and stereotypes held about them. Unfortunately, the rather lurid films shown in Togo at the cinema and on TV, plus society’s general attitude towards women in Africa, may make Togolese view female Volunteers as “loose,” or “available.” Togolese men may misinterpret friendly and open gestures by female Volunteers as an unintended invitation to something more serious.
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[[Tim Bradley]]<br>
+
-
[[John Schwager]]
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-
==1970==
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Friendships with Togolese men should have clear boundaries in the beginning. Unlike in the U.S. there is less of a concept that a completely platonic relationship can exist between men and women. To be treated respectfully, female Volunteers may find that they will have to curb some of the activities they were used to in the United States. Late-night socializing with Togolese colleagues is not recommended. Neither is inviting any man into your house for any reason if you are alone.  Fortunately, you can entertain male guests without giving them—or the community—the wrong idea by remaining in the family compound and ensuring that several family members or neighborhood children are with you and your guest at all times.  
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[[Dennis C. Bangs]]<br>
+
-
[[Vctor L Berthelsdorf]]<br>
+
-
[[Don Dilworth]]<br>
+
-
[[Bruce Horowitz]]<br>
+
-
[[Terry Linkletter]]<br>
+
-
[[Al Stevenson]]
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-
[[Bob McInnes]]
+
-
==1971==
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This may sound extreme, but it is better to play it safe, especially at the beginning of your service, rather than to be caught in a situation where a Togolese colleague is expecting sex instead of a friendly chat when he comes to visit. It is also a very good idea to make friends with the women in your family and/or neighborhood as soon as possible. Not only will these friendships probably be immensely rewarding, but spending time with women will also prevent unwelcome or inappropriate attention from men.  
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[[Karen Ekelman]]<br>
+
-
[[Linda Derks Elliott]]<br>
+
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[[Jacqueline M. Kerr]]<br>
+
-
[[Lynn Phalen]]
+
-
==1972==
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Togolese men will frequently ask women to “marry” them or ask for your address. A firm “no” (no smiles, and no eye contact) is usually enough to handle this situation, even though it may have to be repeated a few times. Men will make verbal requests, but it is very rare for them to try force.  Togolese respond very well to gentle humor.
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[[Jon Barkman]]<br>
+
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[[Howard Rhea Cole]]<br>
+
-
[[Eugenia Dressel]]<br>
+
-
[[Greg Hotchkin]]<br>
+
-
[[Henry Tarke]]<br>
+
-
[[Linda Tarke]]
+
-
==1973==
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====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color ====
-
[[Charles Llewellyn]]<br>
+
-
[[Keith Jamtgaard]]<br>
+
-
[[Peter O. Kircher]]<br>
+
-
[[Jim Sheeren]]<br>
+
-
[[Monica Lyons Torres]]
+
-
==1974==
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Though unconsciously, many Togolese expect that American Volunteers will be white. Peace Corps Volunteers in Togo, who are of ethnic minority backgrounds, will generally not find overt biases. However, Togolese may make some stereotypic assumptions. For example, most Asian-American Volunteers will automatically be considered Chinese and Kung Fu experts. An African-American Volunteer may first be mistaken for a Ghanaian or Nigerian because of an Anglicized French accent, and then be regarded more as an American instead of someone with African origins. Volunteers of color may be expected to learn local languages more quickly than other Peace Corps Volunteers, may be asked what their tribal language and customs are, and could find themselves evaluated as less professionally competent than Caucasian Volunteers.
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[[Barbara Lehman von Behren]]<br>
+
-
[[Carol Sivits Molina]]<br>
+
-
[[Fay Behrens]]<br>
+
-
[[Paul Warpeha]]<br>
+
-
[[Ralph Blessing]]
+
-
==1975==
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====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers ====
-
[[Ronald Rivera]]<br>
+
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[[Sharon Elliott]]<br>
+
-
[[Marc Anthony Mahoney]]<br>
+
-
[[Bruce M Froseth]]<br>
+
-
[[Daniel O. Emmons]]<br>
+
-
[[Kent Lupberger]]
+
-
Joseph Rizzari
+
-
==1976==
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Respect comes with age in traditional Togolese society, so being a senior is generally an advantage. Volunteers in their early 20s find that they may have to make an extra effort to be accepted as professional colleagues since very often Togolese of that age are still pursuing their education. Younger Volunteers must work for acceptance and respect since respect in traditional Togolese society is associated with age. In contrast, every wrinkle and every gray hair earns respect for the experience and wisdom they represent.  
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[[Gary B. Dobbas]]<br>
+
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[[O. Rickey Harris]]<br>
+
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[[Richard A. Rogers]]<br>
+
-
[[Sarah Gunter Canez]]<br>
+
-
[[Joanne Logan]]<br>
+
-
==1977==
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====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers ====
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[[D. Phil Turnipseed]]<br>
+
-
[[Dave Schweidenback]]<br>
+
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[[Donald Kelly]]<br>
+
-
[[Philip Hernick]]<br>
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[[Richard G. Bryant]]<br>
+
-
==Omnibus 26 (1978)==
+
Homosexuality is not publicly discussed or acknowledged in Togolese society. Since acceptance in the rural community is part and parcel to a successful Peace Corps experience in Togo, Volunteers with alternative sexual orientations generally choose not to openly discuss their sexual orientation in their villages. Gay and lesbian Volunteers have however, successfully and safely worked in Togo. 
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[[Marie Connell]]<br>
+
-
[[Billy O'Keefe]]<br>
+
-
Patty Hubbuch Bailey
+
-
==Omnibus 27 (1978)==
+
====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers ====
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[[John Alexander]]<br>
+
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==Omnibus unknown (1978)==
+
There are three major religions in Togo: Christianity, Islam and Animism. People with different religious backgrounds than these three may have difficulty practicing their religion.  Being perceived as having no religion at all may not be understood.  
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[[John C. Abramowicz]]<br>
+
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[[Marie Olson Meadows]]<br>
+
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==Omnibus 31 (1979)==
+
====Possible Issues for Volunteers with Disabilities ====
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[[Amanda Tolles]]<br>
+
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[[Keith Pervatt]]<br>
+
-
[[Wilson Ring]]<br>
+
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==Omnibus 34 (1980)==
+
Togolese are very direct and physical disabilities are likely to be pointed out in not very sensitive ways. It should be noted however, that there is no judgment attached to the comments.  It is rather a case of stating the obvious. Transportation in Togo is difficult and would be more so for someone with a physical disability. While there are good medical facilities in the capital, up-country medical care is generally substandard by American values.  
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[[Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind]]<br>
+
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[[Bo (Lenny) Ljungholm]]<br>
+
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[[Bryndis Andrade]]<br>
+
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[[Cheryl Webb]]<br>
+
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[[Douglas C Keck]]<br>
+
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[[Kathleen Busken Gorman]]<br>
+
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[[Wendell Blubaum]]<br>
+
-
==1981==
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For the most part, public facilities in Togo are unequipped to accommodate persons with disabilities. However, as part of the medical clearance process, the Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodation, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Togo without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service.  
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[[Brian Bennett]]<br>
+
FMOI @ King_Tourus420 work with any disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in training, housing, job sites, or other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.  
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[[Brian T. Micke]]<br>
+
-
[[Deborah Wilson Hopkins]]<br>
+
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[[Jeffrey D. Dunlap]]<br>
+
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[[Jimmy A. Rankin]]<br>
+
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[[John Preissing]]<br>
+
-
==Omnibus 36 (1981)==
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[[Category:Togo]]
-
[[Peter R. Brunette]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 37 (1981)==
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-
[[Richard Boren]]<br>
+
-
[[Isabella Molloy Polillo]]
+
-
Mike Taylor
+
-
 
+
-
==1982==
+
-
[[Alan Ragins]]<br>
+
-
[[Conan E. Peisen]]<br>
+
-
[[Karen Uhrig]]<br>
+
-
[[Steve Gilchrist]]<br>
+
-
[[Edwin Ramon Hiel]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 39 (1982)==
+
-
[[Carol Maddox]]<br>
+
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[[Conan Eric Peisen]]<br>
+
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[[Richard Capitanio]]<br>
+
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[[Juanita Mackenzie]]<br>
+
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[[Sean Bradley]]<br>
+
-
[[Christopher Clarke]]<br>
+
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[[Tim Fuller]]<br>
+
-
[[Kenneth Wolf Hasson]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 40 (1982)==
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-
[[Alan Lovejoy]]<br>
+
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[[Anne Quinlan Coloma]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1983==
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-
[[Forrest D Corson]]<br>
+
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[[Sean McGuckin]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 43 (1983)==
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-
[[Tom Cobb]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1984==
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[[Marina Grasso Sinyard]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==1985==
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[[Dennis Sibilia-Young]]<br>
+
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[[Susan Butler-Graham]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 49 (1985)==
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[[David Trevor Wright]]<br>
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[[Scott Mann]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==1986==
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[[Richard Stanley]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 52 (1986)==
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[[Griselle Santos]]<br>
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[[Tamie Mophew]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==1987==
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[[Elizabeth Pisculli]]<br>
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[[Julie Schwantes Boman]]<br>
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[[Keith Loch]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 53 (1987)==
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[[Diana Belle Dreyer]]<br>
+
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[[Nora Dean]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 55 (1987)==
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[[Kenneth W. Gonzales]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1988==
+
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[[Becky Moline Redding]]<br>
+
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[[Carol Tumaylle]]<br>
+
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[[John David Forgey]]<br>
+
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[[Lisa Johnston]]<br>
+
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[[Susan Bullock]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1989==
+
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[[Lisa Dembouski]]<br>
+
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[[William Louis Francisco]]<br>
+
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[[Robert Trussell]]<br>
+
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[[Carrie Raynor Trussell]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 59 (1989)==
+
-
[[Joe Hostler]]<br>
+
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[[Ken Luetkemeyer]]<br>
+
-
[[Nancy Carolyn Brown]]<br>
+
-
[[John Kolbe]]<br>
+
-
[[Sharon Yablon]]<br>
+
-
[[Robert Trussell]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 61 (1989)==
+
-
[[Virginia Boylan]]<br>
+
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[[Carrie Raynor Trussell]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==1990==
+
-
[[Christine Martin]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 63 (1990-1992)==
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[[Lawrence Jay Cevelo Jr.]]<br>
+
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[[Dahna Taylor]]<br>
+
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[[Bob Berninger]]<br>
+
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[[Maribeth Milkowski]]<br>
+
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[[Eugene Martin]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1991==
+
-
[[Diane Lindsay]]<br>
+
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[[Evan A. Kitahara]]<br>
+
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[[Michael A. Wong]]<br>
+
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[[Victoria Imerman]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==Omnibus 65 (1991)==
+
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[[Douglas Claycomb]]<br>
+
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[[Jacinth Taylor]]<br>
+
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[[Joel Hanson]]<br>
+
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[[Yvonne Hanson]]<br>
+
-
 
+
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==1992==
+
-
[[Caryl Alarcon]]<br>
+
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[[Jennifer Lange Schneider]]<br>
+
-
[[Joel Banken]]<br>
+
-
[[Kelly McBride]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 67 (1992)==
+
-
[[Andrew Swift]]<br>
+
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[[David T. Hughes]]<br>
+
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[[Steven Edward Sesnie]]<br>
+
-
[[Wendy McIntire-Cowx]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 68 (1992)==
+
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[[Heidi Hayes]]<br>
+
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[[Mona Treinies (now Dodd)]]<br>
+
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[[Romel Lacson]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1993==
+
-
[[Marie Skertic]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 69 (1992/1993)==
+
-
[[Ellen Gagen]]<br>
+
-
[[Carol Loveless]]<br>
+
-
[[Carrie Caballero-Birchler]]<br>
+
-
[[Lori Webber]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 70 (arrived 1992/1993)==
+
-
[[James Fowler]]<br>
+
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[[Juan Carlos Velasquez]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1994==
+
-
[[Deric William Keltner]]<br>
+
-
[[Dustin Wharton]]<br>
+
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[[George Wohanka]]<br>
+
-
[[Helen Geotina]]<br>
+
-
[[Robert Quance]]<br>
+
-
[[Troy Crowe]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 71 (1994)==
+
-
[[Heather Askey]]<br>
+
-
[[Jill DeTemple]]<br>
+
-
[[Karin Chamberlain]]<br>
+
-
[[Ines Rutkovskis]]<br>
+
-
[[Thomas Harris]]<br>
+
-
[[Toya Simmons]]<br>
+
-
[[Leila Stockwell]]<br>
+
-
[[Debbie Sharp]]<br>
+
-
[[James Thimgan]]<br>
+
-
[[John Clark]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 72 (arrived 1994)==
+
-
[[Karl Banks]]<br>
+
-
[[Gail Zemmol]]<br>
+
-
[[Mark Stillman]]<br>
+
-
[[Kelly Rahn]]<br>
+
-
[[Jodi Hammer]]<br>
+
-
[[Mark Blaha]]<br>
+
-
[[Karen Edwards]]<br>
+
-
[[Andrew Reitz]]<br>
+
-
[[Jason Jex]]<br>
+
-
[[Martha Overby]]<br>
+
-
[[Melissa Mitchell]]<br>
+
-
[[Bryan Kemp]]<br>
+
-
[[Dwight Wilder]] <br>
+
-
[[Shelly Nicholson]]<br>
+
-
[[Lisa Flores]]<br>
+
-
[[Cindy Chin]]<br>
+
-
[[Tricia Culverhouse]]<br>
+
-
[[Donna Lawlor]]<br>
+
-
[[Corrine Manning]]<br>
+
-
[[Rich Olson]]<br>
+
-
[[Pam Leamons]]<br>
+
-
[[Kirk Leamons]]<br>
+
-
[[Wendy Pearce]]<br>
+
-
[[Carolyn Sheilds]]<br>
+
-
[[Jason Jex]]<br>
+
-
[[Tara Duffy]]<br>
+
-
[[Teri Pyle]]<br>
+
-
[[Robyn Rodgers]]<br>
+
-
[[Kye]]<br>
+
-
[[Crystal Reul]]<br>
+
-
[[Pete Fontaine]]<br>
+
-
[[Ceri Dierst-Davies]]<br>
+
-
[[George Walker]]<br>
+
-
[[Shelby Smith]]<br>
+
-
[[Jodi Hammer]]<br>
+
-
[[Dipak Kshitriya]]<br>
+
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[[Eric Cosgrove]]<br>
+
-
[[Nicole Dino]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1995==
+
-
[[Meredith Ellen Gaffney]]<br>
+
-
[[Tresa Megenity]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 73 (1995)==
+
-
[[Bennett Scott Shouse]]<br>
+
-
[[Greg Zweber]]<br>
+
-
[[Stacy Long Sesnie]]<br>
+
-
[[Terry Ruthrauff]]<br>
+
-
[[Kristen Willie]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 74 (1994/1995)==
+
-
[[Stephen Green]]<br>
+
-
[[Melinda Miffitt]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1996==
+
-
[[Cynthia C. Lovato]]<br>
+
-
[[Doug Bisson-Ellefson]]<br>
+
-
[[John Doe]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 75 (1996)==
+
-
[[Eric Schultz]]<br>
+
-
[[Lisa Poley]]<br>
+
-
[[Matt Mercer]]<br>
+
-
[[Peter John Walter]]<br>
+
-
[[Sean D'Souza]]<br>
+
-
[[Stephen A. Church]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
[[Gregg Smith]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 76 (1996)==
+
-
[[Asya Zaraysky]]<br>
+
-
[[Daniel Randolph]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 77 (1997)==
+
-
[[Andrea Lloyd]]<br>
+
-
[[Andy Perleberg]]<br>
+
-
[[Ben Bellows]]<br>
+
-
[[Cindy Smith]]<br>
+
-
[[Jennifer Whitson]]<br>
+
-
[[Joshua Busby]]<br>
+
-
[[Larry Clement]]<br>
+
-
[[Lurleen Mccormick]]<br>
+
-
[[Nathan Brown]]<br>
+
-
[[Sara Bisson-Ellefson]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 78 (1997)==
+
-
[[Laurel Zaks]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==1998==
+
-
[[Dawn Goodwin]]<br>
+
-
[[Eric Gutierrez]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 79 (1998)==
+
-
[[Clara Woodmansee]]<br>
+
-
[[Laura Bird]]<br>
+
-
[[Matthew Paterakis]]<br>
+
-
[[Robert Collins]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 80 (1998)==
+
-
[[Elizabeth Fritz]]<br>
+
-
[[Gamal Dillard]]<br>
+
-
[[Jennifer Tabola]]<br>
+
-
[[Juli Gribus]]<br>
+
-
[[Monica Wilke]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 81 (1998/1999)==
+
-
[[Maj Britt Karin Baker]]<br>
+
-
[[Brian Randolph Baker]]<br>
+
-
[[Jean Chu]]<br>
+
-
[[Jessica Hardesty]]<br>
+
-
[[June Ginther]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 82 (1999)==
+
-
[[Stephanie Palau]]<br>
+
-
[[Ariela Rosenstein]]<br>
+
-
[[Christopher Hawley]]<br>
+
-
[[Daniel Edward Hall]]<br>
+
-
[[Maryann Nolan]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 83 (2000)==
+
-
[[Amy Kloner]]<br>
+
-
[[Ingrid Shea]]<br>
+
-
[[Mark Shea]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 84 (2000)==
+
-
[[Jill Manske de Azocar]]<br>
+
-
[[Laura Wilson]]<br>
+
-
[[Mark Preston]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 85 (2001)==
+
-
[[Laura Fleischer Proano]]<br>
+
-
[[Stephen Louis Krasner]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 86 (2001)==
+
-
[[Briana Corso]]<br>
+
-
[[Jocelyn Getgen]]<br>
+
-
[[Sheila Mahony]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 87 (2002)==
+
-
[[Carl Dean]]<br>
+
-
[[Matthew "Mateo" Stephenson]]<br>
+
-
[[Robert Coronado]]<br>
+
-
[[Jonathan Haskett]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==2004==
+
-
[[Rachel Weisgerber]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 93 (2005)==
+
-
[[John Parker]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 94 (2005)==
+
-
[[Zachary Smith]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==Omnibus 95 (2006)==
+
-
[[Miles Masci]]<br>
+
-
 
+
-
==External links==
+
-
[http://peacecorpsonline.org/messages/messages/467/4497.html Peace Corps Online RPCV Directory for Ecuador]<br>
+
-
[http://www.peacecorpswriters.org/pages/depts/resources/country.html Peace Corps Volunteer writers by country]<br>
+
-
{{who served in|Ecuador}}
+

Latest revision as of 16:54, 19 November 2013

Diversity and cross-cultural issues in [[ ]]
In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with their host countries, Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences. See also:
[[Category: ]]

In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with our host countries, we are making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race, and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other, despite our many differences. Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal.

In other ways, however, our diversity poses challenges. In Togo, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics considered familiar and commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed.

Outside of Togo’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is advertised as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may also be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blonde hair and blue eyes. The people of Togo are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present. We will ask you to be supportive of one another, and encourage you to share American diversity with the Togolese.

In order to ease the transition and adapt to life in Togo, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises with who you are as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions will need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limits. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.

Historically, the Peace Corps and the Togolese people have benefited from the skills and experiences that persons from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds have offered. Volunteers from various backgrounds, all qualified ages, and both genders have served and benefited from their time in Togo. Your experiences in Togo will differ, to some degree, from every other Volunteer’s, both in terms of the challenges and rewards. Togolese are, in general, wonderfully generous, warm, and hospitable people and no matter who you are, if you make the effort necessary to transcend cultural barriers, you will have a rewarding and fruitful stay in Togo.

Contents

[edit] Overview of Diversity in Togo

The Peace Corps staff in Togo recognizes adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be facilitated by the Volunteer-initiated and led diversity committee to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of cultures, backgrounds, religions, ethnic groups, and ages and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who will take pride in supporting each other and demonstrating the richness of American culture.

[edit] What Might A Volunteer Face?

[edit] Possible Issues for Female Volunteers

Americans working in Togo face cultural adjustments in understanding and addressing prejudices and stereotypes held about them. Unfortunately, the rather lurid films shown in Togo at the cinema and on TV, plus society’s general attitude towards women in Africa, may make Togolese view female Volunteers as “loose,” or “available.” Togolese men may misinterpret friendly and open gestures by female Volunteers as an unintended invitation to something more serious.

Friendships with Togolese men should have clear boundaries in the beginning. Unlike in the U.S. there is less of a concept that a completely platonic relationship can exist between men and women. To be treated respectfully, female Volunteers may find that they will have to curb some of the activities they were used to in the United States. Late-night socializing with Togolese colleagues is not recommended. Neither is inviting any man into your house for any reason if you are alone. Fortunately, you can entertain male guests without giving them—or the community—the wrong idea by remaining in the family compound and ensuring that several family members or neighborhood children are with you and your guest at all times.

This may sound extreme, but it is better to play it safe, especially at the beginning of your service, rather than to be caught in a situation where a Togolese colleague is expecting sex instead of a friendly chat when he comes to visit. It is also a very good idea to make friends with the women in your family and/or neighborhood as soon as possible. Not only will these friendships probably be immensely rewarding, but spending time with women will also prevent unwelcome or inappropriate attention from men.

Togolese men will frequently ask women to “marry” them or ask for your address. A firm “no” (no smiles, and no eye contact) is usually enough to handle this situation, even though it may have to be repeated a few times. Men will make verbal requests, but it is very rare for them to try force. Togolese respond very well to gentle humor.

[edit] Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color

Though unconsciously, many Togolese expect that American Volunteers will be white. Peace Corps Volunteers in Togo, who are of ethnic minority backgrounds, will generally not find overt biases. However, Togolese may make some stereotypic assumptions. For example, most Asian-American Volunteers will automatically be considered Chinese and Kung Fu experts. An African-American Volunteer may first be mistaken for a Ghanaian or Nigerian because of an Anglicized French accent, and then be regarded more as an American instead of someone with African origins. Volunteers of color may be expected to learn local languages more quickly than other Peace Corps Volunteers, may be asked what their tribal language and customs are, and could find themselves evaluated as less professionally competent than Caucasian Volunteers.

[edit] Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers

Respect comes with age in traditional Togolese society, so being a senior is generally an advantage. Volunteers in their early 20s find that they may have to make an extra effort to be accepted as professional colleagues since very often Togolese of that age are still pursuing their education. Younger Volunteers must work for acceptance and respect since respect in traditional Togolese society is associated with age. In contrast, every wrinkle and every gray hair earns respect for the experience and wisdom they represent.

[edit] Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers

Homosexuality is not publicly discussed or acknowledged in Togolese society. Since acceptance in the rural community is part and parcel to a successful Peace Corps experience in Togo, Volunteers with alternative sexual orientations generally choose not to openly discuss their sexual orientation in their villages. Gay and lesbian Volunteers have however, successfully and safely worked in Togo.

[edit] Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers

There are three major religions in Togo: Christianity, Islam and Animism. People with different religious backgrounds than these three may have difficulty practicing their religion. Being perceived as having no religion at all may not be understood.

[edit] Possible Issues for Volunteers with Disabilities

Togolese are very direct and physical disabilities are likely to be pointed out in not very sensitive ways. It should be noted however, that there is no judgment attached to the comments. It is rather a case of stating the obvious. Transportation in Togo is difficult and would be more so for someone with a physical disability. While there are good medical facilities in the capital, up-country medical care is generally substandard by American values.

For the most part, public facilities in Togo are unequipped to accommodate persons with disabilities. However, as part of the medical clearance process, the Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodation, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Togo without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. FMOI @ King_Tourus420 work with any disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in training, housing, job sites, or other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.

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