Difference between pages "History of the Peace Corps in the Eastern Caribbean" and "List of resources for Ethiopia"

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(New page: Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Ethiopia, or to connect you to returned Volunteers and other invitees. Pease keep in mind that althoug...)
 
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{{History_of_the_Peace_Corps_by_country}}
 
  
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Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Ethiopia, or to connect you to returned Volunteers and other invitees. Pease keep in mind that although we have tried to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it.
  
 +
A note of caution: As you surf these sites, be aware that you will find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to give opinions and advice based on their own experiences. The opinions expressed are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S. Government. You may find opinions of people who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. As you read these comments, we hope you will keep in mind that the Peace Corps is not for everyone, and no two people experience their service in the same way.
  
 +
===General Information About Ethiopia===
  
 +
http://www.countrywatch.com/ <br>
 +
On this site, you can learn anything from what time it is in the capital of Ethiopia to how to convert from the dollar to Ethiopian currency. Just click on Ethiopia and go from there.
  
The Peace Corps entered the Eastern Caribbean in 1961, when St. Lucia became one of the first countries in the world to receive Volunteers. Since then, approximately 3,300 Peace Corps Volunteers have served on various island nations in the region. Volunteers were initially assigned to education, agriculture, health, youth, and community development projects. The contributions of Volunteers in these areas have provided strong and consistent technical support to the Eastern Caribbean for more than 40 years. Basic human needs programming in the 1970s encouraged health, special education, preschool education, teacher training, forestry, fishery, and livestock extension projects. The 1980s were a period that focused on four projects: education, health, agriculture, and small enterprise development. At the beginning of the 1990s, education, environment, health, and youth initiatives were priorities. Peace Corps/Eastern Caribbean has made significant progress since January 1991 to establish project-based programming and to provide focus to the program. After concluding an assessment of the program in 1993, efforts focused on developing partnerships with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and moving steadily away from formal education into educational projects targeting at-risk youth.  
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http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations <br>
 +
Visit this site for general travel advice about almost any country in the world.
  
Peace Corps Volunteers currently serve in six island nations in the Eastern Caribbean: (1) Antigua and Barbuda, (2) Dominica, (3) Grenada, Carriacou, and Petit Martinique, (4) St. Kitts and Nevis, (5) St. Lucia, and (6) St. Vincent and the Grenadines.  
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http://www.state.gov <br>
 +
The U.S. State Department’s website issues background and consular notes about countries around the world. Find Ethiopia and learn more about its social and political history as well as its contemporary concerns.
  
 +
https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/  <br>
 +
This world factbook provides up-to-date country information.
  
===History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in the Eastern Caribbean ===
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http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm <br>
 +
This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information, and each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political background.
  
Programming on each island nation of Peace Corps/Eastern Caribbean is guided by the development priorities of the various governments and their ministries, as expressed in official plans and budget documents. With these partners, Peace Corps/Eastern Caribbean periodically reviews programming on each island nation to ensure continuing appropriate focus and direction.  
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http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/infonation/info.asp <br>
 +
This United Nations site allows you to search for selected statistical information for member states of the U.N.
  
At present, the major focus of Peace Corps /Eastern Caribbean is on improving the quality of life of disenfranchised and low-income communities by assisting in their transformation from recipients of aid into partners in change. Volunteer activities are aimed primarily at assisting communities in identifying, evaluating, and developing solutions to the many challenges they face. In responding to needs and priorities identified by their communities, Volunteers may be involved in a wide range of activities, including strengthening the capacity of community-based organizations and ministries working at the community level, raising awareness about HIV/AIDS and other chronic diseases, and enhancing educational and employment skills by emphasizing skills transfer in the areas of special education, literacy, and service learning. Peace Corps is considered by many government officials to be a leader in addressing the social and economic problems resulting from high unemployment, drug and alcohol abuse, and unhealthy lifestyle choices among community members in the Eastern Caribbean.  
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http://www.psr.keele.ac.uk/official.htm <br>
 +
This site includes links to all the official sites for governments of countries around the world.
  
The integrated community development program in the Eastern Caribbean addresses community needs and provides Volunteers with the flexibility to find the projects and programs where community needs and Volunteers skills and interests intersect.. As a result, Volunteers are assigned to a community where they work directly with community stakeholders. In addition to a community placement, a few Volunteers may also be assigned to a specific organization or government agency. This, of course, requires careful planning and coordination to ensure that a Volunteer’s primary focus on the community is maintained.
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===Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees===
  
While all Volunteers will address the needs of the community where they have been placed, Volunteers over time will find their special niche in the areas of health, youth development, business, organizational strengthening, education, and service learning. Volunteers may train teachers in special education methodologies or assist national governments in organizing special education services for their students. Volunteers with a passion for business may coordinate Junior Achievement activities and promote entrepreneurship among various groups in their community. Other Volunteers may apply the behavior change communication (BCC) methodology to develop communication products and community outreach programs targeting HIV/AIDS and other problems, such as teenage pregnancy or drug use.
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http://www.rpcv.org <br>
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This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, made up of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local volunteer activities.
  
===Assignment History===
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http://www.rpcvwebring.org <br>
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This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.
  
{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
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http://www.peacecorpswriters.org <br>
|-
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This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers. It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts of their Peace Corps service.
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
+
|-
+
| rowspan="10" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
+
| [[Ag Economics]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Ag Education]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
|-
+
| [[Ag Extension]]
+
| [[1968]]
+
| [[1993]]
+
|-
+
| [[Animal Husband]]
+
| [[1976]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Animal Husband Lg]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Apiculture]]
+
| [[1973]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Crop Extension]]
+
| [[1961]]
+
| [[1994]]
+
|-
+
| [[Farm Mechanics]]
+
| [[1983]]
+
| [[1985]]
+
|-
+
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Soil Science]]
+
| [[1976]]
+
| [[1983]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="8" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
+
| [[Accounting]]
+
| [[1974]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Archictecture]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Business Advising]]
+
| [[1976]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Business Development]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
|-
+
| [[Computer Science]]
+
| [[1998]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
|-
+
| [[Cooperatives]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| [[NGO Advising]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Urban and Regional Planning]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
+
| [[Crisis Corps]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="23" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
+
| [[Art Education]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1998]]
+
|-
+
| [[Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1994]]
+
|-
+
| [[English Teacher]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2000]]
+
|-
+
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
| [[1994]]
+
|-
+
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Gen. Construction]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2000]]
+
|-
+
| [[Home Economics]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Industrial Arts]]
+
| [[1972]]
+
| [[1998]]
+
|-
+
| [[Library Science]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Literacy Ed.]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
| [[1997]]
+
|-
+
| [[Math Teacher Trainer]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Occupat. Therapy]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1987]]
+
|-
+
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1997]]
+
|-
+
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1999]]
+
|-
+
| [[Science Ed/Gen.]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
|-
+
| [[Science Teacher Trainer]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
+
| [[1970]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| [[Special Ed/Blind]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Special Ed/Deaf]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Speech Therapy]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
+
| [[1971]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
+
| [[Comm Forestry Ext]]
+
| [[1993]]
+
| [[1993]]
+
|-
+
| [[Environmental Ed.]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
|-
+
| [[Forestry]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
+
| [[1987]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="9" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
+
| [[Disease Control]]
+
| [[1978]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
+
| [[1970]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Health Degreed]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
|-
+
| [[Health Extension]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Home Econ/Ext.]]
+
| [[1983]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
+
| [[1992]]
+
| [[1992]]
+
|-
+
| [[Med. Technician]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1994]]
+
|-
+
| [[Nursing]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Physical Therapy]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Master's International]]'''
+
| [[Masters Internationalist]]
+
| [[1993]]
+
| [[1999]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
+
| [[Flexible App]]
+
| [[1976]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Unique Skill]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
+
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
+
| [[1977]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="6" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
+
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Mechanics]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Road Const/Engin.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
|-
+
| [[Rural Youth Dev.]]
+
| [[1978]]
+
| [[1994]]
+
|-
+
| [[Youth Development]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
|}
+
  
[[Category:Eastern Caribbean]]
+
===Online Articles/Current News Sites About Ethiopia===
 +
 
 +
http://allafrica.com/ethiopia/ <Br>
 +
News wire stories about Ethiopia
 +
 
 +
===International Development Sites About Ethiopia===
 +
 
 +
http://www.usaid.gov/locations/sub-saharan_africa/countries/ethiopia/ <br>
 +
The U.S. Agency for International Development’s work in Ethiopia
 +
 
 +
http://www.un.org <br>
 +
The United Nations’ website
 +
 
 +
===Recommended Books===
 +
 
 +
# Ashabranner, Brent. A Moment in History: The First Ten Years of the Peace Corps. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1971.
 +
# Clift, Elayne (ed.). But Do They Have Field Experience! Potomac, Md.: OGN Publications, 1993.
 +
# Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). From the Center of the Earth: Stories Out of Africa. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
 +
# Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). Hartmattan: A Journey Across the Sahara. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1994.
 +
 
 +
===Books About the History of the Peace Corps===
 +
 
 +
# Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
 +
# Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985.
 +
# Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.
 +
 
 +
===Books on the Volunteer Experience===
 +
 
 +
# Banerjee, Dillon. So You Want to Join the Peace Corps: What to Know Before You Go. Berkeley, Calif.: Ten Speed Press, 2000.
 +
# Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
 +
# Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
 +
# Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003.
 +
# Herrera, Susana. Mango Elephants in the Sun: How Life in an African Village Let Me Be in My Skin. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1999
 +
# Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
 +
# Kennedy, Geraldine ed. From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
 +
# Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Ethiopia]]

Revision as of 14:14, 14 September 2008

Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Ethiopia, or to connect you to returned Volunteers and other invitees. Pease keep in mind that although we have tried to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it.

A note of caution: As you surf these sites, be aware that you will find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to give opinions and advice based on their own experiences. The opinions expressed are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S. Government. You may find opinions of people who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. As you read these comments, we hope you will keep in mind that the Peace Corps is not for everyone, and no two people experience their service in the same way.

General Information About Ethiopia

http://www.countrywatch.com/
On this site, you can learn anything from what time it is in the capital of Ethiopia to how to convert from the dollar to Ethiopian currency. Just click on Ethiopia and go from there.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations
Visit this site for general travel advice about almost any country in the world.

http://www.state.gov
The U.S. State Department’s website issues background and consular notes about countries around the world. Find Ethiopia and learn more about its social and political history as well as its contemporary concerns.

https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/
This world factbook provides up-to-date country information.

http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm
This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information, and each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political background.

http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/infonation/info.asp
This United Nations site allows you to search for selected statistical information for member states of the U.N.

http://www.psr.keele.ac.uk/official.htm
This site includes links to all the official sites for governments of countries around the world.

Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees

http://www.rpcv.org
This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, made up of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local volunteer activities.

http://www.rpcvwebring.org
This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.

http://www.peacecorpswriters.org
This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers. It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts of their Peace Corps service.

Online Articles/Current News Sites About Ethiopia

http://allafrica.com/ethiopia/
News wire stories about Ethiopia

International Development Sites About Ethiopia

http://www.usaid.gov/locations/sub-saharan_africa/countries/ethiopia/
The U.S. Agency for International Development’s work in Ethiopia

http://www.un.org
The United Nations’ website

Recommended Books

  1. Ashabranner, Brent. A Moment in History: The First Ten Years of the Peace Corps. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1971.
  2. Clift, Elayne (ed.). But Do They Have Field Experience! Potomac, Md.: OGN Publications, 1993.
  3. Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). From the Center of the Earth: Stories Out of Africa. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
  4. Kennedy, Geraldine (ed.). Hartmattan: A Journey Across the Sahara. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1994.

Books About the History of the Peace Corps

  1. Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
  2. Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985.
  3. Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.

Books on the Volunteer Experience

  1. Banerjee, Dillon. So You Want to Join the Peace Corps: What to Know Before You Go. Berkeley, Calif.: Ten Speed Press, 2000.
  2. Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
  3. Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
  4. Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003.
  5. Herrera, Susana. Mango Elephants in the Sun: How Life in an African Village Let Me Be in My Skin. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1999
  6. Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
  7. Kennedy, Geraldine ed. From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
  8. Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).