Difference between pages "Jennifer King" and "Jerry Dean Bryan"

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|firstname=Jennifer
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|firstname=Jerry
|lastname=King
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|middlename=Dean
|country=Uzbekistan
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|lastname=Bryan
|yearservicestarted=2001
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|country=Brazil
|yearserviceended=2001
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|yearservicestarted=
|site=Khiva
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|yearserviceended=1978
|program=Health
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|groupcode=
|assignment01=Health Extension
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|fatalitycause=Overdose
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|fatalitydate=March 31, 1978
 
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{{Volunteer
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|dos=Jennifer King completed her training and was enrolled in the Peace Corps on March 30, 2001. She was responsible to the Ministry of Health during her service. Jennifer King served as a Health Extension Volunteer assigned to Khiva, Uzbekistan at the Red Crescent Center. Here, she had two primary functions. The first was working with the doctor to visit shut-ins, learn about medical practices in Uzbekistan and provide medical consultations as needed. The second was working with the youth volunteers to promote health education in the community. Teaching  concentrated on AIDS and hygiene education. Jennifer had begun a project that focused on training volunteers in health information and informal teaching methods to enable them to prepare school nurses in the community how to teach basic health topics in the schools. She was also helping a youth volunteer research information in the community in efforts to write a grant for an English/Health Resource Center in Khiva. <br><br>  Additional Activities:<br>  May 2001- Attended a three-day seminar with her Uzbek counterpart on using a pregnancy handbook translated into Uzbek. The conference focused on informal methods of teaching, and effective ways of handling harmful cultural myths about pregnancy.<br><br>    June 2001-Participated in a week-long  English language immersion camp for elementary school children in Urgench and taught English primarily through songs and games to about 100 children.<br><br>  June 2001-Attended the Peer Support Network training workshop which focused on active listening skills, confidentiality, and crisis management, was selected by the medical staff to be an official peer supporter. <br><br> August 2001-Participated in a week-long disabled children’s camp at the Red Crescent Center in Khiva. Activities focused on building fine motor skills, self-esteem, and promoting exercise. Approximately 20 children attended the camp. <br><br>  May-August 2001-Made preparations for the Khorezm region G.L.O.W. (Girls Leading Our World) camp. These preparations included grant-writing for equipment, decision-making for the requirements for participants, interviewing applicants and junior counselors, co-teaching leadership training sessions for the junior counselors and schedule-making for the camp. It also included meeting with community leaders to gain financial and governmental support for the camp. <br><br> August 2001- Co-directed the Khorezm G.L.O.W. camp. This camp was a 10-day overnight camp for 65 girls around the region. Its primary purposes were to build self-esteem, improve teamwork skills, and teach leadership skills. Jennifer taught health classes covering topics such as anemia, sex education, first aid, goiter and hygiene. She also taught kickball, bracelet-making, and camp songs. <br><br> May-September 2001- Was a member of a small committee to prepare a training seminar for host country nationals and volunteers in utilizing the Where There is No Doctor manual. In addition, Jennifer prepared a two-hour problem solving session as part of the seminar. <br><br> This is to certify in accordance with Executive Order No. 11103 of 10 April 1963, that Jennifer King served satisfactorily as a Peace Corps Volunteer. For safety reasons, Peace Corps Uzbekistan evacuated September 2001 and her service ended on October 3, 2001. Because she didn’t serve for at least one year,  she is not eligible to be appointed as a career-conditional employee in the competitive civil service on a non-competitive basis. Pursuant to Section 5 (f) of  the Peace Corps Act, 22 U.S.C. No. 2504 (f) as amended, any former Volunteer employed by the United States Government following his/her Peace Corps service is entitled to have any period of satisfactory Peace Corps Volunteer service credited for purposes of retirement, seniority, reduction-in force, leave or other privileges based on length of government service. Peace Corps service shall not be credited toward completion of a probationary or trial period or completion of any service requirement for career appointment.
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"A 20-month Dayton Daily News examination found that the United States government failed to reveal the full truth about the deaths of at least 10 Peace Corps volunteers who died over a 30-year period.
[[Category:Description of Service]]
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"I personally never believed them when they said it was an accidental death," said Ronda Thorne, who learned through records obtained by the Daily News that her brother, 25-year-old Jerry Dean Bryan of Spokane, Wash., had a history of alcohol and drug abuse before he died of a barbiturate overdose in Brazil in 1978. "
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http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-8868647_ITM

Revision as of 18:53, 23 September 2009


IN MEMORY OF
{{#if:Jerry|Firstname::Jerry|}} {{#if:Dean|Middlename::Dean|}} {{#if:Bryan|Lastname::Bryan|}}

{{#if:March 31, 1978|Passed away: Date of death::March 31, 1978|}}
{{#if:|[[Image:{{{image}}}|200px]]|}}

Country Served in::Brazil
Started Service:|}} Started service in::|}}
Group Code|}} ,|x|Group code was::x}}
Site(s)|}} ,|x|Name of community was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|, Name of community was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|, Name of community was::x}}
Region(s)|}} ,|x|Name of region was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|, Name of region was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|,Name of region was::x}}
{{#if:Program|}} {{#if:Served in sector::|}}
Assignment(s)|}} ,|x|Primary assignment was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|, Primary assignment was::x}}{{#arraymap:|,|x|, Primary assignment was::x}}
Cause of death:|}} Cause of death::Overdose|}}
Age:|}} [[Age at death::{{{ageatdeath}}}]]|}}
Volunteer's Homestate|}} [[Is from state::{{{state}}}]]|}}
{{#if:Brazil|Passed away while serving in: Brazil|}}
{{#ask:Served in::Brazil|format=list|limit=15}}
{{#if:March 31, 1978|Passed away in: March 31, 1978|}}
{{#if:March 31, 1978|{{#ask:Date of death::March 31, 1978|format=list|limit=15}}|}}
{{#if:|From US State: [[{{{state}}}]]|}}
{{#if:|{{#ask:[[Is from state::{{{state}}}]]|format=list|limit=15}}|}}
{{#if:|[[]] in Brazil|}}
{{#if:|{{#ask:Served in::BrazilServed in sector::|format=list|limit=15}}|}}
Other Volunteers who passed away while serving in Peace Corps.
{{#ask:Date of death::+|format=list|limit=15}}
Source: FOIA request #10076 (June 2010)

{{#if:|}} {{#if:1978|}} {{#if:[[category:]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:]]|}} {{#if:March 31, 1978||}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{state}}}]]|}}


"A 20-month Dayton Daily News examination found that the United States government failed to reveal the full truth about the deaths of at least 10 Peace Corps volunteers who died over a 30-year period.

"I personally never believed them when they said it was an accidental death," said Ronda Thorne, who learned through records obtained by the Daily News that her brother, 25-year-old Jerry Dean Bryan of Spokane, Wash., had a history of alcohol and drug abuse before he died of a barbiturate overdose in Brazil in 1978. "

http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-8868647_ITM