Difference between pages "History of the Peace Corps in Dominican Republic" and "Packing list for Tanzania"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
{| cellpadding="1" cellspacing="5" style="border: 1px solid #9866FF; background-color: #f3f3ff" width="300"
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| align="center" | '''<big>Country Resources</big>'''
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|-
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| width="50%" |
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*[[Packing lists by country]]
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*[[Training by country]] 
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*[[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles by country]]
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*[[Health care and safety by country]]
+
*[[Diversity and cross-cultural issues by country]]
+
*[[FAQs by country]]
+
*[[History of the Peace Corps by country]] 
+
|}
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</div>
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Since 1962, more than 4,200 Volunteers have served in the Dominican Republic. These Volunteers have contributed to technical skills transfer and institutional capacity-building in a wide range of fields, including agriculture, urban and rural community development, forestry, conservation, environmental education, community health and child survival, nursing, small business development, fisheries, water and sanitation, teacher education, university education, youth development, and information technology.
+
  
Over the years, Peace Corps Volunteers have contributed significantly to the establishment and development of many of the country’s leading nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and have worked hand-in-hand with the various administrations that have governed the Dominican Republic. In keeping with its commitment to peace and development, the Peace Corps remained in the Dominican Republic throughout its civil war in the 1960s. Our commitment to service has been highlighted through the good work of Volunteers and their project partners in the recovery efforts following two of the severest hurricanes (David in 1979 and George in 1998).  
+
This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Tanzania]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.  
  
 +
There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing.  Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing.  In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.
  
===History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in the Dominican Republic ===
+
[http://www.rushtonfinancial.com.au Market Neutral] | [http://www.rushtonfinancial.com.au/why-invest Global Funds]
 +
===General Clothing ===
  
Peace Corps/Dominican Republic provides direct, community-based technical assistance. Volunteers work in marginalized sectors of the population to promote self-help strategies that respond to basic human needs and strengthen community efforts. Currently, the approximately 150 Volunteers in the Dominican Republic strive to increase local capacity for problem solving and to form links with grassroots, regional, and national organizations.  
+
Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionally.  This means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.  
  
While Volunteers work primarily in community economic development, education, the environment, youth development, and health, the Peace Corps’ program has evolved with the country’s changing needs. Innovations include the development of an “information technology for education” project; a multisector approach to programming; and the incorporation of HIV/AIDS prevention, gender and development, and youth service-learning across all projects.  
+
In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.  
  
Peace Corps/Dominican Republic has eight projects within the sectors of education, natural resources, health, and community economic development.
+
* One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
 +
* Sleepwear
 +
* Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
 +
* Hat and sunglasses
 +
* Swimsuit
 +
* One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
 +
* Windbreaker or rain jacket*
  
Special Education In this project, Volunteers work in schools with children and the parents of children with special needs and learning disabilities. Volunteers create awareness among teachers and the community about the needs of these students, promote awareness of the importance of an adequate education for all students, and train teachers in techniques to identify special-needs students and methodologies to provide them with a high-quality education.  
+
Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).  
  
Information Technology for Education This project helps provide teacher training for the more than 300 computer centers established in public high schools around the country. Volunteers train teachers in the use of computers, focusing on how they can improve the quality of education in the classroom. Volunteers also create technology youth groups and help schools develop ways for the community to access information technology facilities. Many Volunteers are assigned to communities near the border with Haiti, some of the most impoverished areas of the country.
+
===For Women ===
  
Agroforestry This project aims to reverse the process of soil erosion and environmental degradation. Volunteers work with low-income rural farmers, participate in reforestation activities, and introduce appropriate agroforestry and soil conservation techniques. Agroforestry Volunteers also help Dominican organizations improve their capabilities to train small farmers in appropriate soil conservation and agroforestry practices, including seedling and fruit tree production, multiple-use tree plots, live and dead barriers, contour planting, and alley cropping.
+
* Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS 
 +
* Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
 +
* One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
 +
* Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)
 +
* Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
 +
* One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
 +
* Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts
  
Environmental Awareness Education This project creates awareness among Dominicans for proper human interaction with the environment, such as appropriate waste disposal, prevention of water contamination and deforestation, soil conservation, watershed protection, protection of marine resources, appropriate energy use, preservation of air quality, noise and safety procedures, and demographic effects on the environment. To accomplish this, Volunteers help the Ministry of Education develop and implement education modules that train teachers how to incorporate environmental concepts into their curricula. They also provide training and technical support to community leaders to develop and implement projects that incorporate sound environmental practices and promote environmental protection.
+
===For Men ===
 +
* Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
 +
* Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
 +
* Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
 +
* Three short-sleeved T-shirts
 +
* Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
 +
* One jacket and tie for official functions
 +
* One or two pairs of shorts
  
Healthy Families The Healthy Families project aims to reduce the risk of infant mortality in low-income families living in rural and marginal urban communities. Volunteers are assigned to the Ministry of Public Health or one of several private voluntary organizations. They help health supervisors improve and sustain basic health practices and services. The project focuses on the key causes of infant mortality: diarrhea, respiratory infections, and malnutrition. Some Volunteers also help health workers promote reproductive health and HIV/ AIDS prevention among adolescents and young mothers.
+
===Shoes ===
  
Environmental Sanitation Volunteers seek to reduce various endemic diseases by increasing access to potable water and improved waste disposal and sanitary facilities. Volunteers train community members to operate and maintain their water and sanitation systems and help private voluntary organizations improve their capacity to plan, implement, and evaluate environmental sanitation projects. Like the Healthy Families project, this project focuses on low-income families living in rural and marginal urban communities.
+
* Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
 +
* Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
 +
* Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
 +
* One pair of sneakers or running shoes
 +
* Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals
  
Community Economic Development Volunteers take a broad approach to fostering economic development opportunities and community capacity-building among the neediest sectors of the population. They work with farmer associations and rural community groups to develop income-generating projects in agribusiness, organize integrated community development projects, and work with NGOs to provide business education to microentrepreneurs.  Many Volunteers also provide business and leadership education to Dominican youth, using a curriculum similar to Junior Achievement’s.
 
  
Youth, Families, and Community Development Based on the strong interest of Volunteers and a need identified by Dominican partner agencies, the Peace Corps began a formal youth, families, and community development project in 2002 to complement and support its other projects. While many existing projects already involve youth in their efforts, this project’s programs intentionally target at-risk youth in urban areas and strengthen youth groups in semi-urban and rural areas.
+
Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!
  
To maximize resources and promote a more holistic approach to development, Peace Corps/Dominican Republic encourages multisector programming. Ideally, Volunteers from different technical project areas combine and leverage their skills to develop solutions for the challenges faced by the communities in which they work. Additionally, due to the rising incidence of HIV/AIDS on the island, most Volunteers incorporate HIV/ AIDS education and prevention in the work they do.
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
  
==Assignment History==
+
Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. Tampons (Tampax) may not be available near your site, and are no longer being provided by the Peace Corps Medical Office. It is recommended that you bring at least a three month supply of tampons, or a diva cup. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.  
{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
+
|-
+
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
+
|-
+
| rowspan="8" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
+
| [[Ag Economics]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
|-
+
| [[Ag Education]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
|-
+
| [[Ag Extension]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Animal Husband]]
+
| [[1979]]
+
| [[1999]]
+
|-
+
| [[Animal Husband Lg]]
+
| [[1964]]
+
| [[1964]]
+
|-
+
| [[Apiculture]]
+
| [[1976]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[Crop Extension]]
+
| [[1962]]
+
| [[2002]]
+
|-
+
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="5" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
+
| [[Accounting]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
|-
+
| [[Business Advising]]
+
| [[1977]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Business Development]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Computer Science]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| [[Cooperatives]]
+
| [[1971]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
+
| [[Crisis Corps]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
| [[2004]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="15" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
+
| [[Art Education]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
|-
+
| [[English Teacher]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
+
| [[1988]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
+
| [[1979]]
+
| [[1987]]
+
|-
+
| [[Gen. Construction]]
+
| [[1970]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[Home Economics]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| [[Industrial Arts]]
+
| [[1970]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
|-
+
| [[Literacy Ed.]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
|-
+
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
|-
+
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
+
| [[1985]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
+
| [[2006]]
+
| [[2006]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
|-
+
| [[Special Ed/Blind]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
+
| [[1999]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
+
| [[Comm Forestry Ext]]
+
| [[1986]]
+
| [[1998]]
+
|-
+
| [[Environmental Ed.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| [[Forestry]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="6" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
+
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
+
| [[1969]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Health Degreed]]
+
| [[1982]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Health Extension]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Home Econ/Ext.]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
|-
+
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| [[Nursing]]
+
| [[1984]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Master's International]]'''
+
| [[Masters Internationalist]]
+
| [[1990]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
+
| [[Flexible App]]
+
| [[1975]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[Unique Skill]]
+
| [[1979]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
+
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="5" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
+
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
|-
+
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
+
| [[1981]]
+
| [[2008]]
+
|-
+
| [[Road Const/Engin.]]
+
| [[1985]]
+
| [[1985]]
+
|-
+
| [[Rural Youth Dev.]]
+
| [[1989]]
+
| [[1993]]
+
|-
+
| [[Youth Development]]
+
| [[2002]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
|}
+
  
[[Category:Dominican Republic]]
+
===Kitchen ===
 +
 
 +
Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.
 +
 
 +
* Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
 +
* Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
 +
* Good kitchen knife*
 +
* Measuring cups and spoons
 +
* Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
 +
* Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4
 +
 
 +
 
 +
===Entertainment ===
 +
 
 +
Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.
 +
 
 +
* Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
 +
* Shortwave radio
 +
* Camera and film
 +
* Binoculars
 +
* Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
 +
* Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
 +
* Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
 +
* Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
 +
* Books
 +
 
 +
===Miscellaneous ===
 +
 
 +
* A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
 +
* One set of sheets with pillowcase
 +
* English dictionary and/or thesaurus
 +
* Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
 +
* Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
 +
* A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
 +
* A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
 +
*      Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join [http://www.marketforchange.com Market for Change]
 +
* Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
 +
* Sewing kit
 +
* Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
 +
* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
 +
* Plastic egg carrier
 +
* Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
 +
* Travel alarm clock
 +
* Shoe waterproofing kit
 +
* Duct or packing tape
 +
* Day pack
 +
* Journal or diary
 +
* U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
 +
* Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
 +
* For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site.
 +
Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers
 +
 
 +
Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.
 +
 
 +
Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Tanzania]]

Revision as of 21:42, 10 December 2015

Country Resources

This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Tanzania and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.

There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing. Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing. In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.

Market Neutral | Global Funds

General Clothing

Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionally. This means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.

In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.

  • One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
  • Sleepwear
  • Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
  • Hat and sunglasses
  • Swimsuit
  • One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
  • Windbreaker or rain jacket*

Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).

For Women

  • Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS
  • Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
  • One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
  • Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)
  • Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
  • One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
  • Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts

For Men

  • Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
  • Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
  • Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
  • Three short-sleeved T-shirts
  • Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
  • One jacket and tie for official functions
  • One or two pairs of shorts

Shoes

  • Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
  • Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
  • Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
  • One pair of sneakers or running shoes
  • Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals


Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!

Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. Tampons (Tampax) may not be available near your site, and are no longer being provided by the Peace Corps Medical Office. It is recommended that you bring at least a three month supply of tampons, or a diva cup. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.

Kitchen

Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.

  • Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
  • Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
  • Good kitchen knife*
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
  • Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4


Entertainment

Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.

  • Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
  • Shortwave radio
  • Camera and film
  • Binoculars
  • Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
  • Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
  • Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
  • Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
  • Books

Miscellaneous

  • A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
  • One set of sheets with pillowcase
  • English dictionary and/or thesaurus
  • Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
  • Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
  • A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
  • A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
  • Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join Market for Change
  • Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
  • Sewing kit
  • Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
  • Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
  • Plastic egg carrier
  • Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
  • Travel alarm clock
  • Shoe waterproofing kit
  • Duct or packing tape
  • Day pack
  • Journal or diary
  • U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
  • Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
  • For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site.

Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers

Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.

Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.