Timeline

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<big>Advice for Peace Corps Applicants</big>
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  HELLO, Peace Corps Invitees!                     
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Just scroll down until you see your country, and then just follow the pattern like the line above it. If you make a mistake, no problem!           
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by [[Chuck Ludlam]]
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<br />
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Update by the Wiki Community Dec. 2013
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<br />
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It is organized both by country and by date. You can add to both categories or just one, but it would be helpful for organization to add to both.              
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As a double RPCV and a prominent member of the movement to reform the Peace Corps, applicants often ask me how to approach the application process and the decision to accept an invitation to serve.
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Don't forget to click 'Save Page' at the bottom to save your changes!
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My advice is always the same: applicants to the Peace Corps should be selective and cautious in accepting an invitation to serve. '''“Buyer Beware”''' should be their watch word because the quality of the programs in the seventy-seven Peace Corps countries varies considerably. Because applicants will be committing two years of their lives to this service, they should be confident that the Peace Corps program (e.g. Senegal, agriculture) in which they serve will be professionally managed and respectful of the Volunteers. By being selective, applicants can be more certain that they will be empowered to serve productively and emerge from their service feeling proud of what they have accomplished.
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There are actually four different places to add a new invitation. (We are working on a way to make it more efficient)
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==Introduction==
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a) TIMELINE, by date and country (where you are now)
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To make an informed choice, '''applicants must request relevant information about the country and the program in which they are invited to serve'''. If substantial numbers of applicants request this information, the Peace Corps will establish routine procedures to make the information available to applicants in a timely manner, i.e. it will be sent to them with the invitation to serve. 
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b) DEPARTURES BY MONTH page
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c) Individual [COUNTRY] page
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d) Specific MONTH_YEAR page
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Please add to as many places as you feel comfortable. Thanks! =)
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Applicants should understand that they have leverage in requesting this information. The idea that applicants are in surplus – a reported “three to one ratio” of applicants to training slots – may be a misconception. The Peace Corps appears, in fact, to be scrambling to fill training slots. The ratio may be three to one before the onerous medical screening process, but after that process is completed, the ratio of medically fit applicants to training slots appears to be more like one-to-one. In short, '''the main criterion for selection in the Peace Corps is medical fitness'''. So each individual applicant is needed by the Peace Corps to fill its programs.  
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Applicants typically have seven days to accept or reject an invitation to serve in a specific country and program, giving little time to be selective and ask questions. Given this short turnaround time, the applicants should inform the Peace Corps recruiter well in advance that they will need certain information about the country and program when the invitation is finally issued. 
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'''To date the Peace Corps has not been transparent with applicants, the Congress, Peace Corps alumni, or the press'''. So initially, Peace Corps personnel may not be enthusiastic about supplying relevant information to applicants. In fact, applicants might be told – directly or indirectly – that if they do not accept the first invitation, they might not get another. In the same way, they might be told that they are not being cooperative and flexible, which are important characteristics for a successful Volunteer. Applicants must stand firm and insist that they receive the information they need to make an informed choice in their own best interests.
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'''Source(s):'''  [http://downloadranking.com/support.php  Timeline]
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If the Peace Corps does not provide relevant information that enables the applicant to assess the quality of the program, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Applicants are being asked to spend two years of their lives as Volunteers, so the least the agency can do is provide full transparency about the Peace Corps and the management and effectiveness of its programs.  
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Following is a description of information that will help enable the applicant to determine whether or not to accept an invitation to serve. These recommendations are taken from our Peace Corps reform report.
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<center><div style="border-right: 1px solid white; border-bottom: 1px solid white; background: yellow none repeat scroll 0% 0%; width: 20em; text-align: center; margin-right: 1em; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; font-size: 120%;"><div style="border: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170);"><div style="border-top: 1px solid white; border-left: 1px solid white;"><span class="plainlinks"> '''[http://peacecorpswiki.org/Timeline?title=Timeline&action=edit Click here to add your country or date!]'''</span></div></div></div></center> <!-- (End of Code for the Button) -->                                             
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<br><center><big>'''''(Receive an [[Help:Watching_pages | automatic e-mail notification]] when this page has been updated!)'''''</big></center>           
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[[Image:Pc-invite.jpg|thumb|left|"'''Congratulations!''' It is with great pleasure that we invite you to begin training in..."]][[Image:Invitepaperwork.JPG|thumb|right|''"Speaking of overwhelming...." (Invitee)'']] Please be sure to '''only''' add [[{{CURRENTYEAR}}]] and [[{{#expr:{{CURRENTYEAR}}+1}}]] invitations. We only want those, ''nothing'' from any "unofficial directories" we know of, and '''no''' speculations. Please remember that departures can always change, and this should be a guide only, nothing is set in stone. Especially in the Peace Corps! :)                                       
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Why? Because we don't want to be misleading to those of us looking for departing countries in [[{{CURRENTYEAR}}]]/[[{{#expr:{{CURRENTYEAR}}+1}}]]. If you add a country, make sure to add the country/date to both sections: by date and by country. Please use the staging date. Only do so if it is ''your'' invitation. If you start getting invitations for months we don't have on here-- just add those to our list and please format it the same way. Use the '''staging''' date, because that is what they use as the "6-wk deadline" rule. Also, do not delete anything under "By Date" or "By Country" as that will be misleading in future months/years since this Timeline is an attempt to create a time archive of programs we can read, not just one date. Past invitations can be found at the '''[[Timeline Archive]]'''. Thank you all! <br>                                             
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==Early Quit Rates==
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1. [[ET|Early Quit Rates]]: Applicant should request data on the “early termination” (ET) rates – that is, the percentage of applicants who fail to complete their 26-27 months of service. The ET rate data is a relevant measure of the quality of the overall management of Peace Corps in a country. Worldwide ET rates [[ETrates|average more than 30%]] and vary from about 15% up to nearly 70%. For years the ET rate data has been obscured as a measure of the performance of Peace Corps.2 However, the Peace Corps has recently conceded that the “cohort” rate – the measure of how many applicants fail to complete their service – is the appropriate ET rate measure. Applicants should insist on knowing the “cohort” ET rate and not accept an “annual” ET rate measure – a misleading figure that does not measure the percentage of Volunteers who complete their service. The applicant should also request the ET rate for the specific program (i.e. health, education, agriculture) in which he or she has been invited to serve and the break out of the reasons given by the Volunteers and the Country Director for the early quitting in that country and program. If the Peace Corps refuses to divulge accurate ET rate data for the country in which the applicant is invited to serve or if the ET rate for that country is greater than about 20%, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve.
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Use the [[Calculator|Placement Calculator]] if all you have is your nominated region and sector. If you know the month as well you can cross-reference both pages.<br>             
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==Volunteer Survey Results==
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2. [[2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey|Volunteer Survey Results]]: Applicants should request the results of the most recent agency survey of the Volunteers for the country in which they are invited to serve. They should request the complete country-by-country results of the survey so that they may rank the countries. To be sure, the Peace Corps has thus far refused to release the results of these surveys in response to Freedom of Information requests. We obtained a copy of the [[2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey]] and the country-by-country results and published them in Peace Corps Wiki PCW has published spread sheets that enable applicants to rank the countries with regard to various key questions. One of the most important questions in the survey is the one that focuses on the quality of the Country Director, the individual who sets the tone and standards for Peace Corps operations in each country. If the ratings for the Country Director are low, it is likely that the country program has problems. Applicants should also request to see the survey responses, including the responses to open-ended questions, for the Volunteers who serve in the specific program in which the applicant is invited to serve (i.e. health, education, agriculture). If the Peace Corps refuses to release the most recent survey results and the country-by-country and program-by-program results, or if the country or program are ranked in the bottom half or bottom quarter of the countries where Volunteers serve, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. 
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==Contacting Current and Returned Volunteers==
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3. [[Contacting Current Volunteers]]: The Peace Corps should make available to the applicant/invitee the contact information for Volunteers who are currently serving in the country and program. Applicants can then ask them relevant questions about the program and determine how to prepare for service. Some current Volunteers have blogs and applicants can find them through http://www.PeaceCorpsJournals.com. Additionally, there is an independent forum called, Peace Corps Forum, that is available for new applicants, trainees, current volunteers, returned volunteers, and people who are generally interested in the Peace Corps at http://peacecorpsforum.com/.
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'''Source(s):''' [http://downloadranking.com/support.php  Timeline]
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==Confidential Reviews==
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4. Confidential Reviews: Applicants should request information on whether the country program solicits the views of Volunteers on a confidential basis regarding the Peace Corps staff and programs. Programs that respect the Volunteers solicit their views annually on a confidential basis. Providing a hotline number to call in case of an emergency is not sufficient to prevent problems before they cause a crisis.''' Confidentiality is the key because most applicants are unwilling to speak up unless their identity is kept confidential.''' Country programs that report the views of the Volunteers to all of the Volunteers and/or publish them on its website are especially impressive. If the country does not solicit the views of the Volunteers on a confidential basis, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress ([[S. 732|S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007]]) to require that it solicit the views of Volunteers on a confidential basis regarding staff and programs. 
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==Whistle Blower Rights==
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5.[[Reform_Plan_Ludlam_Hirschoff_Part_II_Twenty_Point_Plan#Point_Seventeen:_Ensure_Peace_Corps_Office_of_Inspector_General_Again_Leads_Investigations_of_Violent_Crimes_Against_Volunteers.2FStaff|Whistle Blower Rights]]: Applicants should request information on whether the country program protects Volunteer whistle blowers from retaliation. Volunteers should not be vulnerable to retaliation if they blow the whistle on poor management or corruption in the program. If the country does not provide protections against retaliation for Volunteer whistle blowers, the applicant consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress ([[S. 732|S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007]]) to give Volunteers whistle blower protections. 
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==Rapid Expansion==
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6. [[Congressional_Appropriations#Doubling_Campaign|Rapid Expansion]]: Applicants should request information about any recent increase in the number of Volunteers in the country to which they are invited to serve. The Peace Corps has recently increased the overall number of Volunteers by 1,000 despite the fact that Volunteers favored reform over expansion by 2.5 to 1 in the [[H6|2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey]]. There exist obvious tradeoffs between quantity (number of Volunteers) and quality (good programs and training). '''This rapid increase places extraordinary stress on the Peace Corps staff''', which may not have been increased in advance of the flood of new Volunteers. The expansion makes it more difficult for the staff to adequately manage training, prepare sites, recruit local counterparts, and support the Volunteers in their work. If the country in which the applicant is invited to serve has seen a rapid increase in the number of Volunteers, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation.
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==Seed Funding for Demonstrations==
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7. [[Reform_Plan_Ludlam_Hirschoff_Part_II_Twenty_Point_Plan#Point_Three:_Achieve_Greater_Sustainable_First_Goal_Results|Seed Funding for Demonstrations]]: Applicants should request information about the availability of funding for Volunteers to cover their work-related expenses, including expenses to launch demonstrations. Without seed funding, Volunteers often find that it is difficult to succeed. If sufficient funds are not available to Volunteers in the country, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress ([[S. 732|S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007]]) to require that it reimburse Volunteers for their work-related expenses. 
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==Conclusion==
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This advice to applicants is given so that they can make a better informed choice about whether or not to serve. '''My goal is to avoid a situation where the applicant accepts an invitation and then, due to poor management of the agency, they need to quit early or become demoralized.''' We want them to enter service with high expectations and have these met by the Peace Corps. The Peace Corps is nothing except for its Volunteers and it owes them an extraordinary opportunity to serve and a reasonable opportunity to achieve sustainable development results. When the applicants ask for relevant information, and serve effectively, they become part of the Peace Corps reform movement that will ensure that the Peace Corps thrives and prospers.
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==Timeline==
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==Resources for Applicants==
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{| border=0 align=center width=100%
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*[[Calculator|Placement Calculator]]
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|-valign="top"
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| width=20% | <div style="font-size: 13pt">'''By Date'''</div>             
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{| width=100%
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| width=20% | [http://peacecorpswiki.org/Timeline?title=Timeline&action=edit edit]
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| width=20% | ([[calendar]])
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| width=20% |             
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|}
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<b> 4 months from today: {{StripWhitespace|{{TodayPlusX|16*7}}}}</b>
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<!-- *********************** BY DATE ***************** -->               
 
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[[2014]]
 
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[[January]] 10 = [[Thailand]] <br>
 
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January 13 = [[Morocco]] <br>
 
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January 14 = [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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January 22 = [[South Africa]] <br>
 
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January 23 = [[Vanuatu]] <br>
 
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January 28 = [[El Salvador]] <br>
 
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January 29 = [[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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[[February]] 3-4 = [[Zambia]] <br>
 
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February 4 = [[Ghana]] <br>
 
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February 10 = [[Ethiopia]] <br>
 
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February 11 = [[Guatemala]] <br>
 
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February 11 = [[Madagascar]] <br>
 
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February 12 = [[Tanzania]] <br>
 
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February 18 =[[Panama]] <br>
 
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[[March]] 3 = [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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March 4 = [[Nicaragua]] <br>
 
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March 4 = [[Dominican Republic]] <br>
 
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March 10 = [[Jamaica]] <br>
 
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March 10 = [[Namibia]] <br>
 
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March 10 = [[Costa Rica]] <br>
 
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March 15 = [[Indonesia]] <br>
 
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March 17 = [[Albania]] <br>
 
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March 17 = [[Mexico]] <br>
 
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March 24 = [[Ukraine]] <br>
 
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March 31 = [[Azerbaijan]] <br>
 
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[[April]] 20 = [[Georgia]] <br>
 
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April 23 = [[Kyrgyz Republic]] <br>
 
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April 28 = [[Guyana]] <br>
 
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[[May]] 28 = [[Cameroon]] <br>
 
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May 13 = [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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May 28 = [[Mozambique]] <br>
 
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May 29 = [[Mongolia]] <br>
 
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[[June]] 2 = [[Burkina Faso]] <br>
 
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June 3 = [[Uganda]] <br>
 
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June 4 = [[Moldova]] <br>
 
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June 10 = [[Zambia]] <br>
 
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June 22= [[Benin]] <br>
 
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June 27= [[China]] <br>
 
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[[2013]]
 
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[[January]] 11 = [[Thailand]] <br>
 
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January 14 = [[Morocco]] <br>
 
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January 15 = [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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January 24 = [[South Africa]] <br>
 
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January 29 = [[El Salvador]] <br>
 
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[[February]] 10 = [[Ethiopia]] <br>
 
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February 11 = [[Zambia]] <br>
 
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February 12 = [[Guatemala]] <br>
 
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February 13 = [[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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February 19 = [[Panama]]  <br>
 
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[[March]] 4 = [[Madagascar]] <br>
 
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March 5 = [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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March 5 = [[Malawi]] <br>
 
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March 5 = [[The Gambia]] <br>
 
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March 5 = [[Dominican Republic]]  <br>
 
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March 11 = [[Jamaica]] <br>
 
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March 11 = [[Costa Rica]] <br>
 
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March 15 = [[Nicaragua]] <br>
 
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March 18 = [[Albania]] <br>
 
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March 23 = [[Uganda]] <br>
 
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March 25 = [[Ukraine]] <br>
 
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[[April]] 4=[[Azerbaijan]] <br>
 
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April 7=[[Indonesia]] <br>
 
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April 16=[[Kyrgyz Republic]] <br>
 
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April 21=[[Georgia]] <br>
 
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April 24=[[Uganda]] <br>
 
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[[May]] 1=[[Guyana]] <br>
 
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May 14=[[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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May 20=[[Armenia]] <br>
 
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May 29=[[Mozambique]] <br>
 
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May 29=[[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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[[June]] 1=[[Mongolia]] <br>
 
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June 4 = [[Micronesia]] <br>
 
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June 4 = [[Moldova]] <br>
 
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June 5 = [[Togo]] <br>
 
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June 7 = [[Peru]] <br>
 
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June 10 = [[Togo]] <br>
 
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June 11 = [[Zambia]] <br>
 
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June 11 = [[Rwanda]] <br>
 
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June 17 = [[Sierra Leone]] <br>
 
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June 18 = [[Guatemala]] <br>
 
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June 18 = [[Panama]] <br>
 
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June 24 = [[Benin]] <br>
 
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June 25 = [[Swaziland]] <br>
 
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June 25 = [[Belize]] <br>
 
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June 27 = [[China]] <br>
 
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[[July]] 1= [[Ethiopia]] <br>
 
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July 1 = [[Guinea]] <br>
 
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July 3 = [[Tanzania]] <br>
 
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July 4 = [[South Africa]] <br>
 
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July 5 = [[Philippines]] <br>
 
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July 8 = [[Costa Rica]] <br>
 
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July 8 = [[Madagascar]] <br>
 
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July 9 = [[Cambodia]] <br>
 
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July 12 = [[Cambodia]] <br>
 
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July 22 = [[Namibia]] <br>
 
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July 23 = [[El Salvador]]
 
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[[August]] 12 = [[Botswana]] <br>
 
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August 13 = [[Nicaragua]] <br>
 
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August 15 = [[Ukraine]] <br>
 
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August 20 = [[Dominican Republic]] <br>
 
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August 25 = [[Mexico]] <br>
 
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August 27 = [[Colombia]] <br>
 
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[[September]] 1 = [[Fiji]] <br>
 
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September 1 = [[Tonga]] <br>
 
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September 10 = [[Rwanda]] <br>
 
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September 11 = [[Cameroon]] <br>
 
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September 12 = [[Peru]] <br>
 
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September 13 = [[Macedonia]] <br>
 
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September 16 = [[Ukraine]] <br>
 
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September 24 = [[Mozambique]] <br>
 
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September 24 = [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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September 25 = [[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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[[October]] 1 = [[Kenya]] <br>
 
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October 7 = [[Burkina Faso]] <br>
 
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October 9 = [[Lesotho]] <br>
 
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[[November]] 11=[[Uganda]] <br>
 
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[[December]] 2=[[Guinea]] <br>
 
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[[2012]]
 
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[[January]] 3 = [[Guatemala]] <br>
 
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January 8 = [[Thailand]] <br>
 
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January 10 = [[Nicaragua]] <br>
 
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January 10 = [[Panama]] <br>
 
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January 18 = [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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January 23 = [[South Africa]] <br>
 
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January 24 = [[El Salvador]]  <br>
 
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January 24 = [[Zambia]] <br>
 
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January 26 = [[St. Vincent and the Grenadines]] <br>
 
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January 30 = [[Guyana]]  <br>
 
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[[February]] 6= [[Ghana]] <br>
 
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February 8= [[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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February 12= [[Tanzania]] <br>
 
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February 20= [[Costa Rica]] <br>
 
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February 21= [[Kazakhstan]] <br>
 
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February 22= [[Honduras]] <br>
 
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February 27= [[Madagascar]] <br>
 
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February 28= [[Dominican Republic]] <br>
 
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[[March]] 5= [[Malawi]] <br>
 
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March 6=  [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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March 6=  [[The Gambia]] <br>
 
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March 12= [[Ukraine]] <br>
 
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March 13= [[Jamaica]] <br>
 
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March 19= [[Morocco]] <br>
 
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[[April]] 24= [[Uganda]] <br>
 
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[[May]] 1= [[Panama]] <br>
 
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May 7= [[Rwanda]] <br>
 
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May 8= [[Nicaragua]] <br>
 
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May 16= [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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May 21= [[Ethiopia]] <br>
 
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May 30= [[Paraguay]] <br>
 
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May 31= [[Mali]] <br>
 
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May 31= [[Togo]] <br>
 
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[[June]] 1= [[Mongolia]] <br>
 
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June 4= [[Costa Rica]] <br>
 
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June 4= [[Burkina Faso]] <br>
 
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June 5= [[Swaziland]] <br>
 
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June 6= [[Cameroon]] <br>
 
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June 6= [[Liberia]] <br>
 
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June 12= [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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June 27= [[Benin]] <br>
 
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June 29= [[China]] <br>
 
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[[2011]]
 
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[[June]] 1 = [[Cameroon]] <br>             
 
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June 1 = [[Sierra Leone]] <br>
 
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June 1 = [[Ecuador]] <br>
 
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June 1 = [[Mali]] <br>
 
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June 1 = [[Sierra Leone]] <br>
 
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June 1 = [[Armenia]] <br>
 
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June 1 = [[Togo]] <br>
 
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June 2 = [[Mongolia]] <br>
 
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June 2 = [[Mozambique]] <br>
 
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June 2 = [[Swaziland]] <br>
 
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June 6 = [[Burkina Faso]]<br>
 
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June 6 = [[Kenya]] <br>
 
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June 6 = [[Ghana]] <br>
 
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June 7 = [[Moldova]] <br>
 
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June 8 = [[Liberia]] <br>
 
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June 9 = [[Peru]] <br>
 
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June 13 - [[Tanzania]] <br>
 
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June 13 = [[Senegal]] <br>
 
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June 14 = [[Malawi]] <br>
 
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June 28 = [[The Gambia]] <br>
 
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June 28 = [[Jamaica]] <br>
 
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June 29 = [[Benin]] <br>
 
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June 29 = [[China]]<br>
 
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[[July]] 1 = [[Philippines]]<br>
 
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July 5 = [[South Africa]]<br>
 
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July 6 = [[Honduras]]<br>
 
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July 6 = [[Guinea]]<br>
 
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July 11 = [[Madagascar]]<br>
 
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July 13 = [[Cape Verde]]<br>
 
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July 18 = [[Zambia]]<br>
 
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July 19 = [[El Salvador]]<br>
 
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July 22 = [[Cambodia]]<br>
 
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[[August]] 1 = [[Zambia]] <br>             
 
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August 3 = [[Uganda]]<br>
 
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August 8 = [[Guatemala]]<br>
 
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August 12 = [[Botswana]] <br>
 
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August 16 = [[Panama]]<br>
 
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August 17 = [[Cameroon]]<br>
 
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August 17 = [[Dominican Republic]]<br>             
 
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August 17 = [[Kazakhstan]]<br>
 
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August 18 = [[Namibia]]<br>
 
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August 29 = [[Senegal]]<br>
 
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August 29 = [[Mexico]]<br>
 
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August 30 = [[Nicaragua]]<br>
 
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[[September]] 9 = [[Macedonia]]<br>
 
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September 12 = [[Morocco]]<br>
 
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September 12 = [[Rwanda]]<br>
 
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September 15 = [[Botswana]]<br>
 
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September 15 = [[Peru]]<br>
 
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September 14 = [[Togo]]<br>
 
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September 19 = [[Ukraine]]<br>
 
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September 21 = [[Cameroon]]<br>
 
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September 21 = [[Ukraine]]<br>
 
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September 22 = [[Azerbaijan]]<br>
 
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September 27 = [[Paraguay]]<br>
 
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September 29 = [[Turkmenistan]]<br>
 
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September 30 = [[Mozambique]]<br>
 
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[[October]] 3 = [[Kenya]]<br>
 
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October 04 = [[Ghana]]<br>
 
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October 05 = [[Ethiopia]]<br>
 
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October 07 = [[Vanuatu]]<br>
 
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October 09 = [[Burkina Faso]] <br>
 
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October 10 = [[Kenya]]<br>
 
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October 10 = [[Tanzania]] <br>
 
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October 12 = [[Lesotho]] <br>
 
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October 12 = [[Colombia]] <br>
 
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October 18 = [[Jordan]] <br>
 
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October 28 = [[Mali]] <br>
 
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[[November]] 28 = [[Guinea]] <br>
 
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<[[!---Entries--->
 
-
 
-
<!----Note on formatting: "T" PC group and "R" for PC response + "year"|"countryname"|"Month and day"|"Staging City"|"Groupcode" (with no spacing) Example: T2012|Botswana|April 1|Philadelphia|B23|May 12  If there are multiple stagings for the same just create another template with the same year example: T2012|Botswana|April 1|B23|May 12 T2012|Botswana|September 15|B24|October 12 ---->                   
 
-
<!----Albania---->
 
-
{{T2010|Albania|Mar 17}}
 
-
{{T2011|Albania|Mar 14}}
 
-
{{T2012|Albania|Mar 14}}
 
-
{{T2012|Albania|Mar 18}}
 
-
{{T2013|Albania|Mar 18}}
 
-
{{T2014|Albania|Mar 17|__|G17}}
 
-
<!----Armenia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Armenia|May 27|Philadelphia}}             
 
-
{{T2011|Armenia|May 26|Philadelphia}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Armenia|June 1|Philadelphia|A19}}
 
-
{{T2012|Armenia|May 24}}
 
-
{{T2013|Armenia|May 20}}
 
-
<!----Azerbaijan---->
 
-
{{T2010|Azerbaijan|September 23|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Azerbaijan|September 22}}
 
-
{{T2013|Azerbaijan|April 4}}
 
-
{{T2014|Azerbaijan|March 31}}
 
-
<!----Belize ---->
 
-
{{T2010|Belize|March 24|Dallas}}
 
-
{{T2011|Belize|March 22|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Belize|June 25}}
 
-
<!----Benin ---->
 
-
{{T2010|Benin|July 14|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Benin|June 29|Philadelphia}} 
 
-
{{T2012|Benin|June 27|}}     
 
-
{{T2013|Benin|June 24|}}     
 
-
{{T2014|Benin|June 22|}}     
 
-
<!----Botswana---->
 
-
{{T2010|Botswana|April 10|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Botswana|April 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Botswana|September 15|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Botswana|August 12}}
 
-
<!----Bolivia----->
 
-
<!----Bulgaria---->
 
-
{{T2009|Bulgaria||Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Bulgaria|May 10|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Bulgaria|March 28|Philadelphia|B27|June 10}}
 
-
<!----Burkina Faso---->
 
-
{{T2010|Burkina Faso|June 9|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Burkina Faso|June 21|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Burkina Faso|October 13|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Burkina Faso|May 23|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Burkina Faso|June 6|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Burkina Faso|October 9|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Burkina Faso|June 4|}}
 
-
{{T2013|Burkina Faso|October 7|}}
 
-
{{T2014|Burkina Faso|June 7|}}
 
-
<!----Cambodia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Cambodia|July 19|San Francisco}}
 
-
{{T2011|Cambodia|July 22|San Francisco|K5}}
 
-
{{T2013|Cambodia|July 9}}
 
-
{{T2013|Cambodia|July 12}}
 
-
<!----Cameroon---->
 
-
{{T2010|Cameroon|June 2|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Cameroon|September 15}}
 
-
{{T2011|Cameroon|June 1}}
 
-
{{T2011|Cameroon|August 17}}
 
-
{{T2011|Cameroon|September 21}}
 
-
{{T2013|Cameroon|May 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|Cameroon|September 11}}
 
-
{{T2014|Cameroon|May 28}}
 
-
<!----Cape Verde---->
 
-
{{T2010|Cape Verde|July 15|Boston}}
 
-
{{T2011|Cape Verde|July 13|Boston}}
 
-
<!----China---->
 
-
{{T2010|China|June 29|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|China|June 29|Chicago}}
 
-
{{T2012|China|June 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|China|June 27|San Francisco}}
 
-
<!----Colombia---->
 
-
{{T2011|Colombia|October 12|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Colombia|August 27}}
 
-
<!----Costa Rica---->
 
-
{{T2010|Costa Rica|March 1|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Costa Rica|October 4|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Costa Rica|February 20}}
 
-
{{T2012|Costa Rica|June 4}}
 
-
{{T2013|Costa Rica|March 11}}
 
-
{{T2013|Costa Rica|July 8}}
 
-
<!----Dominican Republic---->
 
-
{{T2010|Dominican Republic|March 2|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Dominican Republic|August 18|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Dominican Republic|March 1|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Dominican Republic|August 17|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Dominican Republic|February 28|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Dominican Republic|March 5|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Dominican Republic|August 20}}
 
-
{{T2014|Dominican Republic|March 4}}
 
-
<!----Eastern Caribbean---->
 
-
{{T2010|Eastern Caribbean|February 15|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2010|Eastern Caribbean|August 23|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Eastern Caribbean|January 27}}
 
-
{{T2013|Eastern Caribbean|January 24}}
 
-
<!----Ecuador---->
 
-
{{T2010|Ecuador|February 16|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Ecuador|June 15|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ecuador|February 2|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ecuador|June 1|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Ecuador|January 18|Dallas, TX}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ecuador|January 15}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ecuador|May 14}}
 
-
{{T2014|Ecuador|January 13}}
 
-
{{T2014|Ecuador|May 13}}
 
-
<!----El Salvador---->
 
-
{{T2010|El Salvador|February 2|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|El Salvador|July 20|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|El Salvador|January 18|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|El Salvador|July 19|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|El Salvador|January 24|cancelled}}
 
-
{{T2012|El Salvador|January 29|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|El Salvador|January 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|El Salvador|July 23|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2014|El Salvador|January 28}}
 
-
<!----Ethiopia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Ethiopia|September 13|Atlanta}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ethiopia|May 23|Atlanta}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ethiopia|July 1}}
 
-
{{T2014|Ethiopia|February 10}}
 
-
<!----Fiji---->
 
-
{{T2010|Fiji|May 19|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2011|Fiji|May 17|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2013|Fiji|September 3}}
 
-
<!----Gambia, The---->
 
-
{{T2010|The Gambia|June 29|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|The Gambia|January 4|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|The Gambia|June 28|Chicago}}
 
-
{{T2012|The Gambia|March 6|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|The Gambia|March 5|}}
 
-
<!----Georgia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Georgia|April 26|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Georgia|April 25|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Georgia|May 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|Georgia|April 21}}
 
-
{{T2014|Georgia|April 20}}
 
-
<!----Ghana---->
 
-
{{T2010|Ghana|June 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ghana|June 6|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ghana|October 4|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Ghana|February 6|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ghana|February 6}}
 
-
{{T2014|Ghana|February 3}}
 
-
<!----Guatemala---->
 
-
{{T2009|Guatemala|January 6|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Guatemala|January 4|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Guatemala|April 28|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Guatemala|August 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Guatemala|January 4|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Guatemala|April 27|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Guatemala|August 8|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Guatemala|January 3|Cancelled}}
 
-
{{T2013|Guatemala|February 12|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Guatemala|June 18}}
 
-
{{T2014|Guatemala|February 11|Washington, DC}}
 
-
<!----Guinea---->
 
-
{{T2011|Guinea|November 27|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Guinea|July 1}}
 
-
<!----Guyana---->
 
-
{{T2010|Guyana|February 9|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Guyana|February 15|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Guyana|May 1}}
 
-
{{T2014|Guyana|April 28}}
 
-
<!----Honduras---->
 
-
{{T2010|Honduras|February 22|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Honduras|June 22|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Honduras|February 23|Atlanta}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Honduras|July 6|Atlanta}}
 
-
{{T2012|Honduras|February 22|Cancelled}}
 
-
<!----Indonesia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Indonesia|March 15}}
 
-
{{T2011|Indonesia|April 4|San Francisco}}
 
-
{{T2013|Indonesia|April 7}}
 
-
{{T2014|Indonesia|March 15}}
 
-
<!----Jamaica---->
 
-
{{T2010|Jamaica|March 17|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Jamaica|June 28|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2012|Jamaica|March 13|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2012|Jamaica|March 11|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Jamaica|March 11}}
 
-
{{T2014|Jamaica|March 10}}
 
-
<!----Jordan---->
 
-
{{T2010|Jordan|October 22|Philadelphia|J14}}
 
-
{{T2011|Jordan|October 18|Philadelphia|J15}}
 
-
<!----Kazakhstan---->
 
-
{{T2010|Kazakhstan|August 18|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Kazakhstan|March 9|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Kazakhstan|August 17|Washington, DC}}
 
-
<!----Kenya---->
 
-
{{T2010|Kenya|May 24|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Kenya|October 11|Philadelphia}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Kenya|June 6|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Kenya|October 10|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Kenya|October 03|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Kenya|June 4|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Kenya|October 1}}
 
-
<!----Kiribati---->
 
-
<!----Kyrgyz Republic---->
 
-
{{T2010|Kyrgyz Republic|March 26|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Kyrgyz Republic|March 25|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Kyrgyz Republic|April 16}}
 
-
{{T2014|Kyrgyz Republic|April 23}}
 
-
<!----Lesotho---->
 
-
{{T2010|Lesotho|June 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Lesotho|May 31|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Lesotho|October 12|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Lesotho|June 5}}
 
-
{{T2013|Lesotho|October 9}}
 
-
<!----Liberia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Liberia|July 7|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Liberia|June 8|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Liberia|June 6|}}
 
-
<!----Macedonia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Macedonia|September 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Macedonia|September 9|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Macedonia|September 13}}
 
-
<!----Madagascar---->
 
-
{{T2010|Madagascar|March 1}}
 
-
{{T2010|Madagascar|July 19}}
 
-
{{T2011|Madagascar|February 28}}
 
-
{{T2011|Madagascar|July 11|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Madagascar|February 27}}
 
-
{{T2013|Madagascar|March 4}}
 
-
{{T2013|Madagascar|July 8}}
 
-
{{T2014|Madagascar|February 11}}
 
-
<!----Malawi---->
 
-
{{T2010|Malawi|February 24|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Malawi|July 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Malawi|February 27|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Malawi|June 14|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Malawi|March 5|}}
 
-
{{T2013|Malawi|March 5|}}
 
-
<!----Mali---->
 
-
{{T2010|Mali|July 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mali|January 31|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mali|October 28|Philadelphia}}
 
-
<!----Mauritania---->
 
-
{{T2009||Atlanta}}
 
-
<!----Mexico---->
 
-
{{T2010|Mexico|August 17|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mexico|March 14|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mexico|August 29|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Mexico|August 25}}
 
-
{{T2014|Mexico|March 17}}
 
-
<!----Micronesia and Palau---->
 
-
{{T2010|Micronesia and Palau|September 1|Honolulu}}
 
-
{{T2013|Micronesia and Palau|June 4}}
 
-
<!----Moldova---->
 
-
{{T2010|Moldova|June 8|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Moldova|June 7|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2013|Moldova|June 4}}
 
-
{{T2014|Moldova|June 4}}
 
-
<!----Mongolia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Mongolia|June 3|San Francisco}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mongolia|June 2|San Francisco}}
 
-
{{T2012|Mongolia|June 1|San Francisco}}
 
-
{{T2013|Mongolia|June 1}}
 
-
{{T2014|Mongolia|May 29}}
 
-
<!----Morocco---->
 
-
{{T2010|Morocco|March 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Morocco|September 13|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Morocco|March 14|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Morocco|September 12}}
 
-
{{T2012|Morocco|March 19}}
 
-
{{T2013|Morocco|January 14}}
 
-
{{T2014|Morocco|January 13}}
 
-
<!----Mozambique---->
 
-
{{T2010|Mozambique|September 27|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mozambique|June 2|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Mozambique|September 30}}
 
-
{{T2013|Mozambique|May 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|Mozambique|September 24|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2014|Mozambique|May 28}}
 
-
<!----Namibia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Namibia|February 16|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Namibia|August 17|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Namibia|February 18|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Namibia|August 18|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Namibia|March 11}}
 
-
{{T2013|Namibia|July 22}}
 
-
{{T2014|Namibia|March 10}}
 
-
<!----Nicaragua---->
 
-
{{T2010|Nicaragua|January 19|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Nicaragua|May 11|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Nicaragua|August 31|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Nicaragua|January 11|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Nicaragua|May 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Nicaragua|August 30|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Nicaragua|January 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Nicaragua|March 15|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Nicaragua|August 13}}
 
-
{{T2014|Nicaragua|March 4}}
 
-
<!----Niger---->
 
-
{{T2010|Niger|July 7|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Niger|October 18|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011}}
 
-
<!----Panama---->
 
-
{{T2010|Panama|April 20|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2010|Panama|August 17|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Panama|January 11|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Panama|April 26|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Panama|January 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Panama|May 1}}
 
-
{{T2013|Panama|February 19}}
 
-
{{T2013|Panama|June 18}}
 
-
{{T2014|Panama|February 18}}
 
-
<!----Paraguay---->
 
-
{{T2010|Paraguay|February 8|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2010|Paraguay|June 1|Miami}}       
 
-
{{T2010|Paraguay|September 29|Miami}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Paraguay|February 2|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Paraguay|May 25|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2011|Paraguay|September 27|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2012|Paraguay|February 8|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2012|Paraguay|September 22|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Paraguay|February 13|Miami}}
 
-
{{T2013|Paraguay|May 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|Paraguay|September 25|Miami|G43}}
 
-
{{T2014|Paraguay|January 29}}
 
-
<!----Peru---->
 
-
{{T2010|Peru|June 10|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Peru|September 16|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Peru|June 9|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Peru|June 7}}
 
-
{{T2013|Peru|September 12|Washington, DC}}
 
-
<!----Philippines---->
 
-
{{T2010|Philippines|August 19|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2011|Philippines|July 1|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2013|Philippines|July 5|Los Angeles}}
 
-
<!----Romania---->
 
-
{{T2010|Romania|May 18|Chicago}}
 
-
{{T2011|Romania|April 26|Chicago}}
 
-
<!----Rwanda---->
 
-
{{T2010|Rwanda|February 23}}       
 
-
{{T2010|Rwanda|October 19}}
 
-
{{T2011|Rwanda|May 4}}
 
-
{{T2011|Rwanda|September 12}}
 
-
{{T2013|Rwanda|June 11}}
 
-
{{T2013|Rwanda|September 10}}
 
-
<!----Samoa---->
 
-
{{T2010|Samoa|October 5|Los Angeles}}
 
-
<!----Senegal---->
 
-
{{T2010|Senegal|March 8|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Senegal|August 9|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Senegal|March 7|Washington, DC}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Senegal|June 13|Washington, DC}}       
 
-
{{T2011|Senegal|August 29|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Senegal|March 5|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Senegal|September 24}}
 
-
{{T2014|Senegal|March 3}}               
 
-
<!----Sierra Leone---->
 
-
{{T2010|Sierra Leone|June 2}}
 
-
{{T2011|Sierra Leone|June 1}}
 
-
{{T2013|Sierra Leone|June 18}}     
 
-
{{T2013|Sierra Leone|July 17|Philadelphia}}
 
-
<!----South Africa---->
 
-
{{T2010|South Africa|January 28|Washington, DC}}       
 
-
{{T2010|South Africa|July 12|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|South Africa|January 24|Washington, DC}}       
 
-
{{T2011|South Africa|July 5|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|South Africa|January 23|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|South Africa|January 24}}
 
-
{{T2013|South Africa|July 4|Washington, DC|SA28}}
 
-
{{T2014|South Africa|January 22}}       
 
-
<!----Suriname---->
 
-
{{T2011|Suriname|May 3|Miami}}
 
-
<!----Swaziland---->
 
-
{{T2010|Swaziland|June 25|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Swaziland|June 2|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2012|Swaziland|June 5|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2013|Swaziland|June 25}}
 
-
<!----Tanzania---->
 
-
{{T2010|Tanzania|June 14|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2010|Tanzania|September 20|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Tanzania|June 13|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Tanzania|October 10}}
 
-
{{T2012|Tanzania|June 11}}
 
-
{{T2013|Tanzania|July 3}}
 
-
{{T2014|Tanzania|February 12}}
 
-
<!----Thailand---->
 
-
{{T2010|Thailand|January 16|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Thailand|January 8|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Thailand|January 8|Detroit}}
 
-
{{T2013|Thailand|January 11|Detroit}}
 
-
{{T2014|Thailand|January 10}}
 
-
<!----Togo---->
 
-
{{T2010|Togo|June 3}}
 
-
{{T2010|Togo|September 16}}
 
-
{{T2011|Togo|June 2}}
 
-
{{T2011|Togo|September 15}}
 
-
{{T2013|Togo|June 5}}
 
-
{{T2013|Togo|June 10}}
 
-
<!----Tonga---->
 
-
{{T2010|Tonga|October 5|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2013|Tonga|September 3}}
 
-
<!----Turkmenistan---->
 
-
{{T2010|Turkmenistan|March 23}}
 
-
{{T2010|Turkmenistan|September 30}}
 
-
<!----Uganda---->
 
-
{{T2010|Uganda|February 8}}
 
-
{{T2010|Uganda|August 9}}
 
-
{{T2011|Uganda|February 9}}
 
-
{{T2011|Uganda|August 3}}
 
-
{{T2012|Uganda|April 24}}
 
-
{{T2013|Uganda|March 23}}
 
-
{{T2013|Uganda|April 24}}
 
-
{{T2013|Uganda|November 11}}
 
-
{{T2014|Uganda|June 3}}
 
-
<!----Ukraine---->
 
-
{{T2010|Ukraine|March 29}}
 
-
{{T2010|Ukraine|September 17}}
 
-
{{T2010|Ukraine|September 24}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ukraine|March 21}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ukraine|September 19}}
 
-
{{T2011|Ukraine|September 21}}
 
-
{{T2012|Ukraine|March 12}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ukraine|March 25}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ukraine|August 15}}
 
-
{{T2013|Ukraine|September 16}}
 
-
{{T2014|Ukraine|March 24}}
 
-
<!----Vanuatu---->
 
-
{{T2010|Vanuatu|September 10|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2011|Vanuatu|October 07|Los Angeles}}
 
-
{{T2014|Vanuatu|January 23}}
 
-
<!----Zambia---->
 
-
{{T2010|Zambia|February 17|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Zambia|July 19|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2010|Zambia|July 19|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Zambia|January 31|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Zambia|February 14|Washington, DC}}
 
-
{{T2011|Zambia|July 18|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2011|Zambia|August 1|Philadelphia}}
 
-
{{T2012|Zambia|January 24}}
 
-
{{T2012|Zambia|February 29}}
 
-
{{T2013|Zambia|February 11}}
 
-
{{T2013|Zambia|June 11}}
 
-
{{T2014|Zambia|February 4}}
 
-
{{T2014|Zambia|June 10}}
 
-
 
-
|<div style="font-size: 13pt">'''By Country'''</div>
 
-
{| width=60%
 
-
| width=60% | [http://peacecorpswiki.org/Timeline?title=Timeline&action=edit edit]
 
-
| width=60% |             
 
-
| width=60% |             
 
-
|}
 
-
-----
 
-
<!-- *********************** BY COUNTRY ***************** -->             
 
-
 
-
<!---this code generates the table--->
 
-
{|border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
 
-
|- valign="top"
 
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[[Category:resources]]
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[[Category:Application process]]

Revision as of 10:38, 4 December 2013

Advice for Peace Corps Applicants

by Chuck Ludlam
Update by the Wiki Community Dec. 2013

As a double RPCV and a prominent member of the movement to reform the Peace Corps, applicants often ask me how to approach the application process and the decision to accept an invitation to serve.

My advice is always the same: applicants to the Peace Corps should be selective and cautious in accepting an invitation to serve. “Buyer Beware” should be their watch word because the quality of the programs in the seventy-seven Peace Corps countries varies considerably. Because applicants will be committing two years of their lives to this service, they should be confident that the Peace Corps program (e.g. Senegal, agriculture) in which they serve will be professionally managed and respectful of the Volunteers. By being selective, applicants can be more certain that they will be empowered to serve productively and emerge from their service feeling proud of what they have accomplished.

Contents

Introduction

To make an informed choice, applicants must request relevant information about the country and the program in which they are invited to serve. If substantial numbers of applicants request this information, the Peace Corps will establish routine procedures to make the information available to applicants in a timely manner, i.e. it will be sent to them with the invitation to serve.

Applicants should understand that they have leverage in requesting this information. The idea that applicants are in surplus – a reported “three to one ratio” of applicants to training slots – may be a misconception. The Peace Corps appears, in fact, to be scrambling to fill training slots. The ratio may be three to one before the onerous medical screening process, but after that process is completed, the ratio of medically fit applicants to training slots appears to be more like one-to-one. In short, the main criterion for selection in the Peace Corps is medical fitness. So each individual applicant is needed by the Peace Corps to fill its programs.

Applicants typically have seven days to accept or reject an invitation to serve in a specific country and program, giving little time to be selective and ask questions. Given this short turnaround time, the applicants should inform the Peace Corps recruiter well in advance that they will need certain information about the country and program when the invitation is finally issued.

To date the Peace Corps has not been transparent with applicants, the Congress, Peace Corps alumni, or the press. So initially, Peace Corps personnel may not be enthusiastic about supplying relevant information to applicants. In fact, applicants might be told – directly or indirectly – that if they do not accept the first invitation, they might not get another. In the same way, they might be told that they are not being cooperative and flexible, which are important characteristics for a successful Volunteer. Applicants must stand firm and insist that they receive the information they need to make an informed choice in their own best interests.

If the Peace Corps does not provide relevant information that enables the applicant to assess the quality of the program, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Applicants are being asked to spend two years of their lives as Volunteers, so the least the agency can do is provide full transparency about the Peace Corps and the management and effectiveness of its programs.

Following is a description of information that will help enable the applicant to determine whether or not to accept an invitation to serve. These recommendations are taken from our Peace Corps reform report.

Early Quit Rates

1. Early Quit Rates: Applicant should request data on the “early termination” (ET) rates – that is, the percentage of applicants who fail to complete their 26-27 months of service. The ET rate data is a relevant measure of the quality of the overall management of Peace Corps in a country. Worldwide ET rates average more than 30% and vary from about 15% up to nearly 70%. For years the ET rate data has been obscured as a measure of the performance of Peace Corps.2 However, the Peace Corps has recently conceded that the “cohort” rate – the measure of how many applicants fail to complete their service – is the appropriate ET rate measure. Applicants should insist on knowing the “cohort” ET rate and not accept an “annual” ET rate measure – a misleading figure that does not measure the percentage of Volunteers who complete their service. The applicant should also request the ET rate for the specific program (i.e. health, education, agriculture) in which he or she has been invited to serve and the break out of the reasons given by the Volunteers and the Country Director for the early quitting in that country and program. If the Peace Corps refuses to divulge accurate ET rate data for the country in which the applicant is invited to serve or if the ET rate for that country is greater than about 20%, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve.

Volunteer Survey Results

2. Volunteer Survey Results: Applicants should request the results of the most recent agency survey of the Volunteers for the country in which they are invited to serve. They should request the complete country-by-country results of the survey so that they may rank the countries. To be sure, the Peace Corps has thus far refused to release the results of these surveys in response to Freedom of Information requests. We obtained a copy of the 2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey and the country-by-country results and published them in Peace Corps Wiki PCW has published spread sheets that enable applicants to rank the countries with regard to various key questions. One of the most important questions in the survey is the one that focuses on the quality of the Country Director, the individual who sets the tone and standards for Peace Corps operations in each country. If the ratings for the Country Director are low, it is likely that the country program has problems. Applicants should also request to see the survey responses, including the responses to open-ended questions, for the Volunteers who serve in the specific program in which the applicant is invited to serve (i.e. health, education, agriculture). If the Peace Corps refuses to release the most recent survey results and the country-by-country and program-by-program results, or if the country or program are ranked in the bottom half or bottom quarter of the countries where Volunteers serve, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve.

Contacting Current and Returned Volunteers

3. Contacting Current Volunteers: The Peace Corps should make available to the applicant/invitee the contact information for Volunteers who are currently serving in the country and program. Applicants can then ask them relevant questions about the program and determine how to prepare for service. Some current Volunteers have blogs and applicants can find them through http://www.PeaceCorpsJournals.com. Additionally, there is an independent forum called, Peace Corps Forum, that is available for new applicants, trainees, current volunteers, returned volunteers, and people who are generally interested in the Peace Corps at http://peacecorpsforum.com/.

Confidential Reviews

4. Confidential Reviews: Applicants should request information on whether the country program solicits the views of Volunteers on a confidential basis regarding the Peace Corps staff and programs. Programs that respect the Volunteers solicit their views annually on a confidential basis. Providing a hotline number to call in case of an emergency is not sufficient to prevent problems before they cause a crisis. Confidentiality is the key because most applicants are unwilling to speak up unless their identity is kept confidential. Country programs that report the views of the Volunteers to all of the Volunteers and/or publish them on its website are especially impressive. If the country does not solicit the views of the Volunteers on a confidential basis, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress (S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007) to require that it solicit the views of Volunteers on a confidential basis regarding staff and programs.

Whistle Blower Rights

5.Whistle Blower Rights: Applicants should request information on whether the country program protects Volunteer whistle blowers from retaliation. Volunteers should not be vulnerable to retaliation if they blow the whistle on poor management or corruption in the program. If the country does not provide protections against retaliation for Volunteer whistle blowers, the applicant consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress (S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007) to give Volunteers whistle blower protections.

Rapid Expansion

6. Rapid Expansion: Applicants should request information about any recent increase in the number of Volunteers in the country to which they are invited to serve. The Peace Corps has recently increased the overall number of Volunteers by 1,000 despite the fact that Volunteers favored reform over expansion by 2.5 to 1 in the 2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey. There exist obvious tradeoffs between quantity (number of Volunteers) and quality (good programs and training). This rapid increase places extraordinary stress on the Peace Corps staff, which may not have been increased in advance of the flood of new Volunteers. The expansion makes it more difficult for the staff to adequately manage training, prepare sites, recruit local counterparts, and support the Volunteers in their work. If the country in which the applicant is invited to serve has seen a rapid increase in the number of Volunteers, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation.

Seed Funding for Demonstrations

7. Seed Funding for Demonstrations: Applicants should request information about the availability of funding for Volunteers to cover their work-related expenses, including expenses to launch demonstrations. Without seed funding, Volunteers often find that it is difficult to succeed. If sufficient funds are not available to Volunteers in the country, the applicant should consider carefully whether or not to accept the invitation to serve. Note: The Peace Corps has opposed legislation pending in the Congress (S. 732, the PCV Empowerment Act of 2007) to require that it reimburse Volunteers for their work-related expenses.

Conclusion

This advice to applicants is given so that they can make a better informed choice about whether or not to serve. My goal is to avoid a situation where the applicant accepts an invitation and then, due to poor management of the agency, they need to quit early or become demoralized. We want them to enter service with high expectations and have these met by the Peace Corps. The Peace Corps is nothing except for its Volunteers and it owes them an extraordinary opportunity to serve and a reasonable opportunity to achieve sustainable development results. When the applicants ask for relevant information, and serve effectively, they become part of the Peace Corps reform movement that will ensure that the Peace Corps thrives and prospers.

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