Forestry

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{{wikipedia}}
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After a day of campaigning for the presidency, John F. Kennedy arrived at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on October 14, 1960, at 2:00 a.m., to get some sleep, not to propose the establishment of an international volunteer organization. Members of the press had retired for the night, believing that nothing interesting would happen.
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Volunteers help communities conserve natural resources by working on projects such as soil conservation; watershed management and flood control; production of sustainable fuels; improvement of agroforestry practices such as fruit production; building live fences and alley cropping; and preservation of biodiversity, sometimes near national parks or other reserves.
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''If you can offer a more detailed description than this standard description the Peace Corps offers, please feel free to include that so others can get a better idea of what certain work areas consist of.''
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But 10,000 students at the University were waiting to hear the presidential candidate speak, and it was there on the steps of the Michigan Union that a bold new experiment in public service was launched. The assembled students heard the future president issue a challenge: how many of them, he asked, would be willing to serve their country and the cause of peace by living and working in the developing world?
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==Education==
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Applicants can qualify with a bachelor's degree in forestry, watershed or natural resource management, environmental science, or ecology; or a degree in biology, botany, ornamental horticulture, or geology and six months of work experience; or a degree in any discipline and three years of work experience.
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The reaction was both swift and enthusiastic, and since 1961, more than 182,000 Americans have responded to this enduring challenge. And since then, the Peace Corps has demonstrated how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.  
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==Experience==
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Most applicants have at least six months of practical experience in gardening, farming, or nursery management.
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[[1960s]]
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Other relevant experience includes vegetable production using organic and low-input methods, tree planting or other local conservation activities, landscaping, a high level of comfort working in the outdoors, an understanding of how natural resources can be managed to sustain people's livelihoods, and use of computer applications such as geographic information systems for environmental research and modeling.
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[[1970s]]
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[[1980s]]
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[[1990s]]
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[[2000s]]
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==External Links==
==External Links==
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[http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=learn.whatvol.env.forestry Forestry] Official US Peace Corps Website
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[http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=Learn.whatispc.history.decades Decades of Service] Official US Peace Corps Website
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[[Category:History of the Peace Corps]]

Revision as of 03:33, 15 October 2013

After a day of campaigning for the presidency, John F. Kennedy arrived at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on October 14, 1960, at 2:00 a.m., to get some sleep, not to propose the establishment of an international volunteer organization. Members of the press had retired for the night, believing that nothing interesting would happen.

But 10,000 students at the University were waiting to hear the presidential candidate speak, and it was there on the steps of the Michigan Union that a bold new experiment in public service was launched. The assembled students heard the future president issue a challenge: how many of them, he asked, would be willing to serve their country and the cause of peace by living and working in the developing world?

The reaction was both swift and enthusiastic, and since 1961, more than 182,000 Americans have responded to this enduring challenge. And since then, the Peace Corps has demonstrated how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.


1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s


External Links

Decades of Service Official US Peace Corps Website

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