Difference between pages "Thailand" and "Training in Bolivia"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
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<div style="float: right; font-size:90%; background-color: white; min-width:20%;" margin: 0 0 1em 1em">
|Countryname= Thailand
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{| cellpadding="1" cellspacing="5" style="border: 1px solid #9866FF; background-color: #f3f3ff" width="300"
|CountryCode = th
+
| align="center" | '''<big>Country Resources</big>'''
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
+
|-
|Flag= Flag_of_Thailand.svg
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| width="50%" |  
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/thwb493.pdf
+
*[[Packing lists by country]]  
|Region= [[Asia]]
+
*[[Training by country]]
|CountryDirector= [[Kevin Quigley]]
+
*[[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles by country]]  
|Sectors= [[Education]]<br> [[Business Development]]
+
*[[Health care and safety by country]]  
|ProgramDates= [[1962]] - [[Present]]
+
*[[Diversity and cross-cultural issues by country]]  
|CurrentlyServing= 98
+
*[[FAQs by country]]  
|TotalVolunteers= 4804
+
*[[History of the Peace Corps by country]]
|Languages= [[Thai]]
+
|}
|Map= Th-map.gif
+
</div>Pre-service training consists of 11 weeks of in-country training in five major areas: technical training, language training (Spanish); cross-cultural training; health and safety training; and the role of the Volunteer in development. By living with a Bolivian family and sharing meals, language, and other activities with them, you will begin to adapt to the realities of life in Bolivia while you prepare to become an effective community development worker.  
|stagingdate= Jan 8 2011
+
|stagingcity= Philadelphia
+
}}
+
  
Since 1962, Peace Corps Volunteers have been serving in Thailand in a variety of capacities and numbers. In the second half of 1997, Thailand's economy collapsed after a period of quick decline. The impact was extensive at the national level as well as on the quality of life for the rural population. Thailand has begun to make a significant economic recovery thanks to a number of government reform initiatives. The need for the Peace Corps to continue its service in Thailand is more apparent than at any time in recent years due to the important contribution Peace Corps Volunteers are making to the Royal Thai Government's educational and economic reform initiatives.
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Classes are conducted in the small communities outside the city of Cochabamba. At 8,000 feet above sea level, the Cochabamba area tends to be warm during the days, but a sweater or jacket may be needed after sunset. You will spend time with your entire training group at the nearby Peace Corps training center on Wednesdays.  
  
 +
By the end of training, you must demonstrate that you have completed the learning competencies within all of the training components (technical, language, cross cultural, health and safety, role of the Volunteer in development) before you are sworn-in as a Peace Corps Volunteer. Most trainees are able to achieve these competencies, provided they give 100 percent of themselves during the training activities and make use of their time with their host family and within their host community to practice language and experience Bolivian culture.
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
Completion of the learning competencies is measured through a transparent staff evaluation process with each trainee. This process includes open feedback between each trainee and staff on learning progress. Peace Corps staff evaluates each trainee's demonstrated motivation, productive competence, emotional maturity, social sensitivity, ability to adjust to Bolivian culture, and general cultural awareness. Written exams within each training component also form part of the fulfillment of the learning competencies and the evaluation process. A trainee who does not complete the learning competencies will not be recommended to the Peace Corps/ Bolivia country director for swearing-in as a Volunteer. The country director makes the final decision whether a trainee will be sworn-in or separated from the Peace Corps.
  
{{Volunteersurvey2008
+
Training is a time to reflect on your decision to serve as a Volunteer in Bolivia for the next two years of your life. We expect a strong commitment from Volunteers. If you develop doubts during training, you will have the opportunity to discuss your feelings and options with the Peace Corps staff and fellow trainees. Pre-service training is a dynamic, intense period of learning, and you should be prepared to work hard and commit to doing your best during this time.  
|H1r=  62
+
|H1s=  64.1
+
|H2r=  63
+
|H2s=  72.5
+
|H3r=  61
+
|H3s=  75.3
+
|H4r=  37
+
|H4s=  104.5
+
|H5r=  56
+
|H5s=  45.2
+
|H6r=  60
+
|H6s=  68
+
}}
+
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Thailand]]''
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====Technical Training====
  
Thailand was one of the first countries to receive Peace Corps Volunteers, the first of whom arrived in 1962. More than 7,000 Americans have served as Peace Corps Volunteers in Thailand. Projects in early decades covered many areas, such as secondary and university teaching in English and other subjects, work in agriculture and fisheries, primary healthcare, malaria control, and soil and water conservation.
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Technical training will prepare you to work in Bolivia by building on the skills you already have and by helping you develop new skills that address the needs and goals of your project plan. Peace Corps/Bolivia staff, Bolivian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.  
  
As Thailand has changed over the past four decades, the Royal Thai Government’s requests for assistance have changed. In 1997, the Peace Corps was invited to assist with primary-school educational reform, an area identified by Thais as one of the most important in the country today.  
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Technical training will include sessions on the economic and political environment in Bolivia and strategies for working within such a framework. You will become familiar with your technical sector’s plan and goals and will meet with your counterpart and the organizations that are collaborating with the Peace Corps to facilitate Bolivia’s development process.  
  
 +
You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and to be a productive member of your community.
  
 +
====Language Training====
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
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As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings.  Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.  Experienced Bolivian language instructors teach formal language classes five days a week in small groups of up to four or five people. Additional weekend tutoring is also available.
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Thailand]]''
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Your language training will incorporate a multifaceted approach. In addition to classroom time, there will be field trips, a community development activity, and other assignments outside the classroom. One of the most important language-learning tools at your disposal is your host family.  Time spent interacting with them will help you improve your ability to communicate within the context of Bolivian culture.
  
In villages and small towns, where most Volunteers live, homes have electricity and indoor plumbing, including toilets and cold-water showers (occasionally a hand pump must be used to obtain the water). Drinking water must be either boiled or purchased, but is readily available. Other basic amenities (e.g., soap, shampoo, hair conditioner, lotion, sanitary napkins and tampons, towels, film, stationery, stamps, sodas, and instant coffee) should be available in provincial or regional centers, if not in your town. You should also be able to purchase items like an iron, rice cooker, or fan if desired.
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Unless you are already at an advanced level prior to arriving in Bolivia, your language training will focus on Spanish. While other languages are spoken in Bolivia, almost all communities have some residents who can communicate in Spanish.  Whether you also receive instruction in a native language during pre-service training will depend on your level of Spanish, your site assignment, and input from your APCD. The goal of language training is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further once you are at your site. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your service.  
  
 +
====Cross-Cultural Training====
  
==Training==
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As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Bolivian host family in a small rural community near Cochabamba. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Prior to your arrival, your host family will participate in an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and help them identify ways to help you adapt to Bolivia. Out of respect for your host family, you must comply with Peace Corps/Bolivia’s policies regarding approved time away from your host community during training. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.
  
''Main article: [[Training in Thailand]]''
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Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures. You will have a chance to practice these skills with other trainees in your host community through a unique community development activity designed by Peace Corps/Bolivia trainers.
  
Pre-service training provides you with solid technical, language, health, safety and security, and cross-cultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes to prepare you for living and working safely and successfully in Thailand. Pre-service training is rigorous and demanding, and sometimes not all trainees qualify for Peace Corps service.
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====Health and Safety Training====
  
Peace Corps/Thailand’s training program is split into two parts. Part one (10 weeks) is community-based and prepares you to live and work safely and productively at your site for the first three to six months. We have successfully used a community-based training design since January 1997. In this training model, four or five trainees live and study in villages located a few kilometers from a central “hub” site in a larger town. Most language, cross-cultural, and technical sessions and activities occur in the training village. Throughout pre-service training, you will primarily ride bicycles to the hub site and small group training, where you will study with the larger group for one or two days.  
+
During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Bolivia. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.  
  
 +
During safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
===Role of the Volunteer in Development===
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Thailand]]''
+
Through a variety of sessions, visits and guest speakers, you will be required to demonstrate your ability to work as a develoment facilitator. We will provide you with a “tool box” of techniques for use in your work as a Volunteer. The main areas addressed are gender analysis, working with community groups, development sustainability, and non-formal education.  Included within this training component is a complete Community Development Activity (CDA) in which you will practice using the skills you learn.
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to health and medical issues. The Peace Corps in Thailand maintains its own health unit with qualified and experienced Peace Corps medical officers (PCMOs) and support staff to take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services such as diagnostics, evaluation, and treatment are also available at local, Western-standard hospitals. If you become seriously ill or injured you will be transported either to a Thai medical facility (in Bangkok or the Provincial Hospitals where you serve) or to the United States.
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Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
  
 +
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually six training events. The titles and objectives for those events are as follows:
  
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
* Reconnect in-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to share their experiences and reaffirm their commitment after having served for three to four months.
 +
* Language enhancement in-service training: Assists interested Volunteers in upgrading their language skills after having served for three to four months.
 +
* Midterm conference: Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year and planning for their second year of service.
 +
* Project meeting (biennial): Improves technical skills and promotes communication and support within project sectors.
 +
* Project design workshop (done in conjunction with project meeting): Assists Volunteers and their counterparts in designing effective community projects and applying for outside funding.
 +
* Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Thailand]]''
+
There may be opportunities to attend additional specialized trainings offered to Volunteers in your project sector. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
  
In Thailand, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Thailand.
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[[Category:Bolivia]]
 
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[[Category:Training|Bolivia]]
Outside of Thailand’s capital and other cities, many residents have had relatively little sustained exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles, though they may have had some contact with the many tourists who visit each year. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes.
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* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
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Even though a woman may think she is not especially attractive, she will find herself described as beautiful if she has fair hair and a light complexion. It is not unusual for a blonde volunteer to have strange women touch her hair as she rides on a bus. They are simply curious. However, be aware that Hollywood films have given the impression that western women are "easy". If you date Thai men, this can possibly lead to misunderstandings.
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
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In the early days, Peace Corps discouraged African American volunteers from serving in Thailand. However, when black volunteers were finally allowed, they encountered very little racial prejudice and were well received. There was even a female African American country director in the late 1970s. The only possible difficulty is of an African American volunteer being mistaken for an African (particularly Nigerian), since they have a poor reputation amongst Thais. Asian American volunteers may sometimes be mistaken for Chinese-Thais, which can even work to their advantage.
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* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
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Age is respected in Thailand. Senior volunteers thus have an advantage. Any possible issues will probably relate to health, especially getting used to the heat and humidity of Southeast Asia.
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* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
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Thailand is one of the most liberal minded countries when it comes to homosexuality. Nevertheless, volunteers must remember to conform to the accepted standards of conduct regardless of their sexual orientation. Public displays of affection are frowned upon. Thais will not say anything to an offenders face, but they will most definitely talk behind your back.
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* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
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Thailand is a Theravada Buddhist country, except for the extreme south where Islam prevails. Thais are very tolerant of other religions. Be sure to respect theirs. Remember that you are not a missionary.
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
+
 
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There are schools for the blind and schools for the deaf. However, volunteers with movement disabilities will find there is little attention paid to their needs in Thailand. Handicapped ramps, restrooms and so on are not common even in Bangkok.
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==Packing List==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Packing list for Thailand]]''
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Thailand and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Although you can get almost everything you need in Thailand, underwear, clothes and shoes in larger sizes may be hard to find here.
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* General Clothing
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* For Women
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* For Men
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* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
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* Miscellaneous
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==Peace Corps News==
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Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
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''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22thailand%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
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<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/th/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
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==Country Fund==
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Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=493-CFD Thailand Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Thailand. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
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==See also==
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* [[Volunteers who served in Thailand]]
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* [[Friends of Thailand]]
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* [[List of resources for Thailand]]
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* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
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==External links==
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* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/th.html Peace Corps Journals - Thailand]
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* [http://pcthailand.org PC Thailand Volunteer Wiki]
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[[Category:Thailand]] [[Category:Asia]]
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[[Category:Country]]
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Revision as of 08:32, 8 December 2015

Country Resources
Pre-service training consists of 11 weeks of in-country training in five major areas: technical training, language training (Spanish); cross-cultural training; health and safety training; and the role of the Volunteer in development. By living with a Bolivian family and sharing meals, language, and other activities with them, you will begin to adapt to the realities of life in Bolivia while you prepare to become an effective community development worker.

Classes are conducted in the small communities outside the city of Cochabamba. At 8,000 feet above sea level, the Cochabamba area tends to be warm during the days, but a sweater or jacket may be needed after sunset. You will spend time with your entire training group at the nearby Peace Corps training center on Wednesdays.

By the end of training, you must demonstrate that you have completed the learning competencies within all of the training components (technical, language, cross cultural, health and safety, role of the Volunteer in development) before you are sworn-in as a Peace Corps Volunteer. Most trainees are able to achieve these competencies, provided they give 100 percent of themselves during the training activities and make use of their time with their host family and within their host community to practice language and experience Bolivian culture.

Completion of the learning competencies is measured through a transparent staff evaluation process with each trainee. This process includes open feedback between each trainee and staff on learning progress. Peace Corps staff evaluates each trainee's demonstrated motivation, productive competence, emotional maturity, social sensitivity, ability to adjust to Bolivian culture, and general cultural awareness. Written exams within each training component also form part of the fulfillment of the learning competencies and the evaluation process. A trainee who does not complete the learning competencies will not be recommended to the Peace Corps/ Bolivia country director for swearing-in as a Volunteer. The country director makes the final decision whether a trainee will be sworn-in or separated from the Peace Corps.

Training is a time to reflect on your decision to serve as a Volunteer in Bolivia for the next two years of your life. We expect a strong commitment from Volunteers. If you develop doubts during training, you will have the opportunity to discuss your feelings and options with the Peace Corps staff and fellow trainees. Pre-service training is a dynamic, intense period of learning, and you should be prepared to work hard and commit to doing your best during this time.

Technical Training

Technical training will prepare you to work in Bolivia by building on the skills you already have and by helping you develop new skills that address the needs and goals of your project plan. Peace Corps/Bolivia staff, Bolivian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the economic and political environment in Bolivia and strategies for working within such a framework. You will become familiar with your technical sector’s plan and goals and will meet with your counterpart and the organizations that are collaborating with the Peace Corps to facilitate Bolivia’s development process.

You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and to be a productive member of your community.

Language Training

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer. Experienced Bolivian language instructors teach formal language classes five days a week in small groups of up to four or five people. Additional weekend tutoring is also available.

Your language training will incorporate a multifaceted approach. In addition to classroom time, there will be field trips, a community development activity, and other assignments outside the classroom. One of the most important language-learning tools at your disposal is your host family. Time spent interacting with them will help you improve your ability to communicate within the context of Bolivian culture.

Unless you are already at an advanced level prior to arriving in Bolivia, your language training will focus on Spanish. While other languages are spoken in Bolivia, almost all communities have some residents who can communicate in Spanish. Whether you also receive instruction in a native language during pre-service training will depend on your level of Spanish, your site assignment, and input from your APCD. The goal of language training is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further once you are at your site. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your service.

Cross-Cultural Training

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Bolivian host family in a small rural community near Cochabamba. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Prior to your arrival, your host family will participate in an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and help them identify ways to help you adapt to Bolivia. Out of respect for your host family, you must comply with Peace Corps/Bolivia’s policies regarding approved time away from your host community during training. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.

Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures. You will have a chance to practice these skills with other trainees in your host community through a unique community development activity designed by Peace Corps/Bolivia trainers.

Health and Safety Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Bolivia. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.

During safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Role of the Volunteer in Development

Through a variety of sessions, visits and guest speakers, you will be required to demonstrate your ability to work as a develoment facilitator. We will provide you with a “tool box” of techniques for use in your work as a Volunteer. The main areas addressed are gender analysis, working with community groups, development sustainability, and non-formal education. Included within this training component is a complete Community Development Activity (CDA) in which you will practice using the skills you learn.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually six training events. The titles and objectives for those events are as follows:

  • Reconnect in-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to share their experiences and reaffirm their commitment after having served for three to four months.
  • Language enhancement in-service training: Assists interested Volunteers in upgrading their language skills after having served for three to four months.
  • Midterm conference: Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year and planning for their second year of service.
  • Project meeting (biennial): Improves technical skills and promotes communication and support within project sectors.
  • Project design workshop (done in conjunction with project meeting): Assists Volunteers and their counterparts in designing effective community projects and applying for outside funding.
  • Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.

There may be opportunities to attend additional specialized trainings offered to Volunteers in your project sector. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.