Difference between pages "Packing list for Mongolia" and "Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Mongolia]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, remember that you have a 102-pound weight restriction on baggage.  
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Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Moldova, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Moldova.  
  
You can find almost anything you need in Ulaanbaatar and many basics can be purchased in aimag centers (provincial capitals). Depending upon your site, you may have limited time to shop in Ulaanbaatar until your first in-service training, which is usually held in December. So think carefully about those essential winter items you will need during your first few months at your site.  
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Outside of Moldova’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Moldova are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
  
Before you move to your site, the Peace Corps will provide you with a space heater, water filter or distiller, fire extinguisher, smoke detector, shortwave radio, good-quality extension cord, many teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) books, sleeping bag (some Volunteers find the sleeping bag bulky and heavy and suggest that trainees bring their own for travel purposes), medical kit (described in an earlier section of this book), and a subscription to Newsweek’s international edition.  
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To ease the transition and adapt to life in Moldova, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.  
  
Your living allowance should not be considered a source of funding for major clothing purchases, although replacement clothing is factored into the living allowance. The Peace Corps does not provide reimbursement for winter clothing purchased in the United States. However Peace Corps/ Mongolia does provide a settling-in/winterization allowance that covers the purchase of some winter clothing and supplies in-country.
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===Overview of Diversity in Moldova ===
  
The hard water and strong detergent in Mongolia, not to mention hand-washing, will be harsh on your clothing, so make sure that whatever you bring can stand up to this treatment. Most Volunteers wear their clothes for several days before washing them, so dark colors are a good idea.  While dry cleaning is available in Ulaanbaatar, Darkhan, and Erdenet, you may not have regular access to these cities, and the quality of the service is not consistent.  
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The Peace Corps staff in Moldova recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations, and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.  
  
A wide variety of clothes is available here (many of them made in China), but quality can be lacking. If you have a hard time finding your size in the United States, you won’t find it here, and genuine “high-tech” fibers are not readily available.  Very warm, Mongolian-made winter clothes can be purchased in-country. Walking will be your main mode of transportation around town, and the terrain here is rather rugged, so you need footwear that can take a lot of abuse.
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===What Might a Volunteer Face? ===
  
==General Clothing ==
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The comments below are intended to stimulate thought and discussion. They come from a cross-section of Volunteers who have served in Moldova. The issues discussed may or may not be relevant to your own Volunteer experience; they are here simply to make all Volunteers aware of issues that various groups may have to deal with.
  
Note: Many Volunteers suggest packing very light. Basic clothing and toiletries can be bought here. Save room in your suitcase for music, pictures from home, and things that make a big difference when being away from home for two years. Specialty items like quality long underwear and gloves make good sense to bring from home, but heavy jackets can be bought here for under $30. Also pack a separate bag of winter things or things you won’t need during the 11 weeks of summer training. This bag will be stored at the Peace Corps office and you won’t have access to it during summer training.
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====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers ====
  
* One pair (tops and bottoms) of mid-weight long underwear (it is essential that you purchase these before coming to Mongolia)
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Traditional or stereotyped gender roles are more prevalent in Moldova than they are in the United States. One estimate stated that Moldovan women do 300 percent more work in the home than men do. And it is common for a man to enter a room and shake every other man’s hand while completely ignoring the women who are present. Although Americans are often bothered by such behavior, women do not have a subordinate role in Moldova. Historically, they have been a vital part of the workforce, taking on both managerial and supervisory positions. Moldovan women work as school administrators, business owners, doctors, local government officials, and members of Parliament.
* One pair (tops and bottoms) of heavy-weight long underwear (it is essential that you purchase these before coming to Mongolia)
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* Winter coat or parka (available in Mongolia)
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* Fall and spring coat or parka (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Gloves or mittens (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Scarf (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Stocking cap (readily available in Mongolia)
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* A few (3–4) pairs of woolen socks (readily available in Mongolia)
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* A few (3–4) pairs of cotton socks (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Sun hats (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Two to three “professional” shirts to work in (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Two to three pairs of nice pants for work (readily available in Mongolia)
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* One to two pullover sweaters (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Two pairs of jeans (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Five to six of your favorite T–shirts
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* Sweatpants and sweatshirt (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Two pairs of shorts (essential for summer and playing sports)
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* One formal piece of clothing, such as a suit for males and a dress for women (readily available in Mongolia)
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Note: It is very difficult for tall men and women to find clothing that fits them here. Peace Corps recommends purchasing these items while in the U.S. if you are over 6’ tall.  
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Female Volunteers should not expect, however, to be able to continue all of their American practices in Moldova. Adapting to local mores and customs is a necessity for Peace Corps Volunteers wherever they are. Moldovan women generally lead more restricted lifestyles than American women do. For instance, Moldovan women do not go out alone at night, and jogging or walking alone for exercise is uncommon. Women in villages do not usually smoke in public, and all Moldovans tend to speak more quietly than Americans do in public places. While these activities are not forbidden for Volunteers, sometimes they have to make compromises and alter their behavior. Female Volunteers are advised to avoid eye contact with men who are strangers, especially on buses and in the street.  
  
==For Women ==
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====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color ====
  
* Bras and underwear (larger sizes are difficult to find and the quality may be lacking)
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African-American Volunteers often express frustration and disappointment at being asked where they are from because when they answer “African American” or “black American,” some Moldovans react with surprise or disbelief. Although they may be the subject of constant stares and questions as well as occasional insults, most African-American Volunteers say they are well accepted in their communities after an initial settling-in period. There is a small population of students and businesspeople from Africa in Chisinau, and some African Americans are assigned to the U.S. Embassy.
* Tank tops (readily available in Mongolia)
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* Bathing suit
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==For Men ==
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Hispanic American Volunteers have found that some Moldovans stereotype them as similar to the characters they watch in the popular Latin American soap operas on TV.  Because there is a small population of Romany (Gypsies) in Moldova, some Volunteers have been misidentified and have been the subjects of verbal harassment.
  
* Underwear (the quality of local underwear may be lacking)
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Asian-American Volunteers often find that they stand out more than Caucasians, as there are relatively few East Asians (i.e., Japanese, Chinese, Southeast Asians) in Moldova. People often assume that such Volunteers are from China, and may be skeptical that they are Americans and speak English. While much of this extra attention is not intended to be negative, it can be tiresome. The situation soon goes away in your host village, but may recur when you visit other cities and towns.  Several Asian-American Volunteers have been stopped by police to check identification papers much more frequently than their counterpart Caucasian Volunteers.
* Swim trunks
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==Shoes ==
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====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers ====
  
* Winter boots (available here)
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Respect comes with age in Moldova. Younger Volunteers may have to work harder than their older colleagues to be accepted as professionals. It is not uncommon for younger Volunteers to look to older Volunteers for advice and support. Some seniors find this a very enjoyable part of their Volunteer experience, while others choose not to fill this role.  Overall, senior Volunteers are highly valued for the wealth of experience they bring to their communities and counterparts.
* Hiking boots (not necessary, but the hiking is great here)
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* Sneakers (especially if you like basketball or volleyball since there are plenty of opportunities to play these here)
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* Sandals (outdoor “flip-flop” sandals are not available in Mongolia)
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* Dress shoes
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Note: Men’s shoes larger than size 10 and women’s shoes larger than size 8 are difficult to find in Mongolia.
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====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Volunteers ====
  
==Kitchen ==
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Homosexuality is misunderstood and generally not accepted by most Moldovans, and discussing the issue of sexual orientation may be problematic. It is advisable to use discretion because you may experience difficulties if your community becomes aware of your sexual orientation, compromising your ability to be effective. The Peace Corps staff in Moldova can provide you with information on organizations in Moldova that are working on issues concerning sexual orientation. Additionally, there is a Volunteer gender work group of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and supportive straight Volunteers; its coordinator can provide you with information. You may also find helpful information on serving in the Peace Corps as a gay or lesbian from a group of returned Volunteers affiliated with the National Peace Corps Association (for more information, go to www.lgbrpcv.org; for country-specific information, go to www.gay.md).
  
* Leatherman or Swiss Army Knife
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Gay and lesbian Volunteers can (and do) have a very productive service and a positive experience here in MoldovaHowever, there are some issues you will face in Moldova that may be quite different from what you were used to in the States. There is a small community of gay, lesbian, and bisexual Moldovans in Chisinau, which is becoming increasingly active and hosts social events, but there are few other social activities or meeting places. As a result, many gays and lesbians experience feelings of loneliness and isolation. This is especially true for those who choose closeted lives in communities outside of Chisinau. As a result, you will encounter bias and prejudice about gays and lesbians. You will need to be cautious about who you come out to amongst your Moldovan friends. However, you are encouraged to be out with Peace Corps staff and Volunteers to lessen the feeling of isolation. Peace Corps/Moldova is committed to ensuring an environment that is safe, secure, and accepting of all forms of diversity, and gays, lesbians and bisexuals should feel comfortable talking about whatever issues they are facing. You will find staff and your Volunteer peers to be very supportive.  
* Sturdy water bottle(s) (e.g., Nalgene)
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* Plastic storage bags  
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* Your favorite cookbook (a Volunteer-compiled cookbook will be given to you at the end of pre-service training) Note: the following items have been recommended, but can be purchased in the capital: garlic press, corkscrew, pie tin, French press (electric coffeemakers are available in the capital), vegetable peeler, can opener, spices of all kinds, parmesan cheese, vanilla extract, and gourmet coffee and tea. These are not necessities and will not be needed during training. You don’t need to waste packing space on these since they can be sent to you in a care package once you arrive at your site or purchased in the capital.
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==Personal Hygiene & Toiletry Items ==
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====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers ====
  
Hand and foot warmers (i.e., the charcoal kind that are activated when exposed to air). These are best sent in a care package.  
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There are no official or societal restrictions with regard to religious belief in Moldova. The primary religion is Eastern Orthodox Christianity, which is divided between those affiliated with the Romanian Orthodox Church and those affiliated with the Russian Orthodox Church. There are also congregations of Jews, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Seventh-Day Adventists, Mormons, and others. Religion is an important part of life for many, but by no means all, Moldovans. Most towns and villages have at least one Orthodox church, and some also have small Baptist churches.  
  
The following items have been recommended, but can be purchased in the capital: Razor, blades (these are hard to find, but cheap ones can be found in aimags and expensive gillette sensor-type blades in the capital), and shaving cream, a towel, contact lens solutions, hair-cutting device, antiperspirant or deodorant, hair fixatives, dental floss and fluoride mouthwash.
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====Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities ====
  
Note: Many products are available in Mongolia (e.g., Nivea hand cream, Pantene shampoo, Colgate toothpaste, nail polish, and ALL kinds of cosmetics), but if you are, for instance, a Clinique or Body Shop junkie, bring your own or have them sent.  
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As a disabled Volunteer in Moldova, you may find that you face a special set of challenges. In Moldova, as in other parts of the world, some people may hold prejudicial attitudes about individuals with disabilities and may discriminate against them. In addition, there is little of the infrastructure to accommodate individuals with disabilities that has been developed in the United States.  
  
==Miscellaneous ==
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Nonetheless, as part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodations, of serving in Moldova without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. The Peace Corps/Moldova staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in training, housing, job sites, or other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.
  
* A small photo album of family and friends (a must-bring item)
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[[Category:Moldova]]
* 220-volt converter (essential if you bring American appliances)
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* Rechargeable batteries
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* Camera*
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* Flashlight*
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* American board and card games
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* Music*
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* Solar shower
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* Duct tape (highly recommended)
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* Camping gear (if you like to camp)*
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* Fishing gear (if you like to fish)*
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* Backpack (useful for traveling in-country)
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* Reading materials (much cheaper if sent using a postal M-bag; also, Peace Corps has an extensive lending library)
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* MP3 or iPod player
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* Flash disk or thumb drive
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(*Available in the capital)
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==Work Items for English Education Volunteers==
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Chances are good that your school will not be able to provide you with many resources. Below are a few items that cannot be bought in-country but would be useful in the classroom.
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* Colored construction paper
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* Catalogs (the pictures are useful when teaching)
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* Children’s books, a picture dictionary, songs on tape, and a book about American holidays
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* Erasers for chalkboards
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* Index cards
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==Work Items for Health and Community and Youth Development Volunteers ==
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What you need will depend on your experience in your field and the specific job you have. It is best to assess your situation when you get here and then have items sent from home.
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[[Category:Mongolia]]
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Latest revision as of 06:56, 21 May 2014

Diversity and cross-cultural issues in [[{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with their host countries, Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]
See also:
[[Category:{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Moldova| |7}}]]

In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.

Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Moldova, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Moldova.

Outside of Moldova’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Moldova are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

To ease the transition and adapt to life in Moldova, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.

Overview of Diversity in Moldova[edit]

The Peace Corps staff in Moldova recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations, and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.

What Might a Volunteer Face?[edit]

The comments below are intended to stimulate thought and discussion. They come from a cross-section of Volunteers who have served in Moldova. The issues discussed may or may not be relevant to your own Volunteer experience; they are here simply to make all Volunteers aware of issues that various groups may have to deal with.

Possible Issues for Female Volunteers[edit]

Traditional or stereotyped gender roles are more prevalent in Moldova than they are in the United States. One estimate stated that Moldovan women do 300 percent more work in the home than men do. And it is common for a man to enter a room and shake every other man’s hand while completely ignoring the women who are present. Although Americans are often bothered by such behavior, women do not have a subordinate role in Moldova. Historically, they have been a vital part of the workforce, taking on both managerial and supervisory positions. Moldovan women work as school administrators, business owners, doctors, local government officials, and members of Parliament.

Female Volunteers should not expect, however, to be able to continue all of their American practices in Moldova. Adapting to local mores and customs is a necessity for Peace Corps Volunteers wherever they are. Moldovan women generally lead more restricted lifestyles than American women do. For instance, Moldovan women do not go out alone at night, and jogging or walking alone for exercise is uncommon. Women in villages do not usually smoke in public, and all Moldovans tend to speak more quietly than Americans do in public places. While these activities are not forbidden for Volunteers, sometimes they have to make compromises and alter their behavior. Female Volunteers are advised to avoid eye contact with men who are strangers, especially on buses and in the street.

Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color[edit]

African-American Volunteers often express frustration and disappointment at being asked where they are from because when they answer “African American” or “black American,” some Moldovans react with surprise or disbelief. Although they may be the subject of constant stares and questions as well as occasional insults, most African-American Volunteers say they are well accepted in their communities after an initial settling-in period. There is a small population of students and businesspeople from Africa in Chisinau, and some African Americans are assigned to the U.S. Embassy.

Hispanic American Volunteers have found that some Moldovans stereotype them as similar to the characters they watch in the popular Latin American soap operas on TV. Because there is a small population of Romany (Gypsies) in Moldova, some Volunteers have been misidentified and have been the subjects of verbal harassment.

Asian-American Volunteers often find that they stand out more than Caucasians, as there are relatively few East Asians (i.e., Japanese, Chinese, Southeast Asians) in Moldova. People often assume that such Volunteers are from China, and may be skeptical that they are Americans and speak English. While much of this extra attention is not intended to be negative, it can be tiresome. The situation soon goes away in your host village, but may recur when you visit other cities and towns. Several Asian-American Volunteers have been stopped by police to check identification papers much more frequently than their counterpart Caucasian Volunteers.

Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers[edit]

Respect comes with age in Moldova. Younger Volunteers may have to work harder than their older colleagues to be accepted as professionals. It is not uncommon for younger Volunteers to look to older Volunteers for advice and support. Some seniors find this a very enjoyable part of their Volunteer experience, while others choose not to fill this role. Overall, senior Volunteers are highly valued for the wealth of experience they bring to their communities and counterparts.

Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Volunteers[edit]

Homosexuality is misunderstood and generally not accepted by most Moldovans, and discussing the issue of sexual orientation may be problematic. It is advisable to use discretion because you may experience difficulties if your community becomes aware of your sexual orientation, compromising your ability to be effective. The Peace Corps staff in Moldova can provide you with information on organizations in Moldova that are working on issues concerning sexual orientation. Additionally, there is a Volunteer gender work group of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and supportive straight Volunteers; its coordinator can provide you with information. You may also find helpful information on serving in the Peace Corps as a gay or lesbian from a group of returned Volunteers affiliated with the National Peace Corps Association (for more information, go to www.lgbrpcv.org; for country-specific information, go to www.gay.md).

Gay and lesbian Volunteers can (and do) have a very productive service and a positive experience here in Moldova. However, there are some issues you will face in Moldova that may be quite different from what you were used to in the States. There is a small community of gay, lesbian, and bisexual Moldovans in Chisinau, which is becoming increasingly active and hosts social events, but there are few other social activities or meeting places. As a result, many gays and lesbians experience feelings of loneliness and isolation. This is especially true for those who choose closeted lives in communities outside of Chisinau. As a result, you will encounter bias and prejudice about gays and lesbians. You will need to be cautious about who you come out to amongst your Moldovan friends. However, you are encouraged to be out with Peace Corps staff and Volunteers to lessen the feeling of isolation. Peace Corps/Moldova is committed to ensuring an environment that is safe, secure, and accepting of all forms of diversity, and gays, lesbians and bisexuals should feel comfortable talking about whatever issues they are facing. You will find staff and your Volunteer peers to be very supportive.

Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers[edit]

There are no official or societal restrictions with regard to religious belief in Moldova. The primary religion is Eastern Orthodox Christianity, which is divided between those affiliated with the Romanian Orthodox Church and those affiliated with the Russian Orthodox Church. There are also congregations of Jews, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Seventh-Day Adventists, Mormons, and others. Religion is an important part of life for many, but by no means all, Moldovans. Most towns and villages have at least one Orthodox church, and some also have small Baptist churches.

Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities[edit]

As a disabled Volunteer in Moldova, you may find that you face a special set of challenges. In Moldova, as in other parts of the world, some people may hold prejudicial attitudes about individuals with disabilities and may discriminate against them. In addition, there is little of the infrastructure to accommodate individuals with disabilities that has been developed in the United States.

Nonetheless, as part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodations, of serving in Moldova without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. The Peace Corps/Moldova staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in training, housing, job sites, or other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.