Difference between pages "Suriname" and "Training in Senegal"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
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{{Training_by_country}}
|Countryname = Suriname
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Pre-service training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The objective is to provide you with solid technical, language, and cross-cultural knowledge to prepare you for living and working successfully in Senegal. The training uses an experiential approach wherever possible; thus, rather than reading or hearing about Volunteer activities, you will practice, process, and evaluate actual or simulated activities.  
|CountryCode = ns
+
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
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|Map = Ns-map.gif
+
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/srwb568.pdf
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|Region = [[South America]]
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|CountryDirector = [[Ann Conway]]
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|Sectors = [[Non-Formal Rural Community Education]]
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|ProgramDates = [[1995]] - [[Present]]
+
|CurrentlyServing = 44
+
|TotalVolunteers = 311
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|Languages = [[Dutch]], [[Carib]], [[Ndjuka]], [[Saramaccan]], [[Sranan Tongo]], [[Aucan]]
+
|Flag = Flag_of_Suriname.svg
+
|stagingdate= May 14 2009
+
|stagingcity= Miami
+
}}
+
  
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A welcome committee led by the Peace Corps country director and the training director will meet you at the airport. The committee will help you collect your baggage, go through customs formalities, and load your baggage on rented buses.
  
In 1995, the government of Suriname requested Peace Corps' assistance in rural community development activities for the Amerindian and Maroon communities. Volunteers work in two project areas: community health and small business development. Working in the interior, Volunteers work on activities that increase awareness of basic hygiene practices, encourage parental involvement in educational activities, promote economical development of community members, and conduct life skills training, incorporating healthy water and sanitation practices.
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Because trainees’ baggage has occasionally been left somewhere en route, we advise you to carry essential items, toiletries, and enough clothing for three days in your carry-on  
  
 +
luggage. Be certain to clearly and securely label all your baggage before checking it at the airport.
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
After leaving the airport, you will take a two-hour bus ride to Thiès, the location of the training center. You will stay at the center for your first three days in-country, when training will focus on an orientation to living with a host family; survival classes in Wolof, a local language; safety issues; a medical orientation; language placement interviews; and “getting to know you” activities.
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Suriname]]''
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At the end of the fourth day, you will travel upcountry to spend two or three nights in a village with one other trainee and a Volunteer host. You will have an opportunity to talk about the Peace Corps experience with your host and experience firsthand some of the skills required to succeed as a Volunteer. When you return to the training center on the eighth day, you will discuss your upcountry experience. You will then meet your host family at the training center, who will take you home to begin the home stay program.
  
In 1994, the Peace Corps received a formal invitation from the Government of Suriname to establish a program in the country. It asked for the Peace Corps’ assistance in rural community development of the interior Amerindian and African/Maroon communities. The formal agreement between the United States and Suriname was signed in January 1995.
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You will have your own room, but the furniture in the room
  
Peace Corps staff arrived in March 1995. The first two Volunteers—with two years of Volunteer experience in another country—arrived in August. In September 1995, the first training group, consisting of eight married couples, began the Peace Corps’ 12-week intensive pre-service training program (PST). Since then, a new group has arrived annually.
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will be minimal, just what you need to sleep. Trainees generally consider the home stay to be the most valuable training activity. Because the families do not speak English, we strongly recommend that you acquire at least a basic understanding of French prior to arriving in Senegal, whether through adult education courses, cassette tapes, or other means.  
  
The Peace Corps/Suriname program has changed since its start in 1995. In 1998, Suriname welcomed the first single Volunteers into the program, and in 1999, Volunteers were placed for the first time in the capital to work with health agencies on health issues facing rural communities. Peace Corps/Suriname began using a community-based training model in 1999.
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The training week is long and demanding, so come prepared to work hard. You will start at 8 a.m. and work till 6 p.m., with breaks throughout the day. On Saturdays, you will have classes from 8 a.m. until noon, with afternoons free. In general, language classes are in the morning and technical classes in the afternoon. You will have breakfast and lunch at the training center and dinner with your host family. You will walk to and from the training center every day, but organized transportation will be provided for the first couple of weeks to give you time to become familiar with the town. Pre-service training has four components: language, technical, cross-cultural, and personal health. Safety training is integrated into all these components, but particularly the cross-cultural and medical components. To facilitate language acquisition, the primary language spoken at the training center is French, a method known as language immersion. While immersion in French is the rule at the start of training, when trainees begin to learn African languages toward the end of training, they may speak both French and local languages at the center. Cross-cultural training is both hands-on and theoretical, with sessions to help you gain insight into and appreciation of Senegalese culture. Technical training also consists of theoretical sessions in the classroom and a lot of hands-on activities. Health training is delivered by a Peace Corps medical officer.  The training staff will be available for support throughout the program and will provide feedback on your progress. You must attain required competencies all four components to be sworn in as a Volunteer. The key to a successful training is effort.  
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
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Members of the Peace Corps medical staff will visit the training center at least two days a week to offer consultations and facilitate sessions on personal health care. They will also vaccinate you against the various endemic diseases in the region. If an emergency occurs when members of the medical staff are not at the center, the training center staff will contact them by phone.
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Suriname]]''
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During training, when you are not doing fieldwork, you will be expected to wear neat, clean, and conservative clothing.  Pants, shirts (including T-shirts), skirts, and dresses are fine, but shorts are appropriate only for recreational activities (e.g., jogging or soccer). You can receive mail at the training center’s post office box, but the center’s telephone is for official business only. You can make calls to the United States at the post office for approximately $7 per minute. Mail will be collected from the post office once a day on workdays. You will have to pay customs taxes of about $4 to $7 for any packages, depending on the items’ value. Peace Corps service is not for everyone. Training is a time for you to reevaluate your commitment to two years of service.  Although training is very intense, it can also be a lot of fun. Be flexible and maintain a good sense of humor, and you will have a rewarding and enjoyable training experience.
  
Trainees are placed with a host family for most of pre-service training. After swearing-in as Volunteers, they typically live in their own homes within their communities. Volunteers are located at sites in the interior, in districts or in the capital.
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===Technical Training ===
  
The sites in the interior are along the Suriname and Marowijne rivers or in the savanna region. Interior villages often do not have running water or electricity, or have those services for a limited number of hours each day. Houses are rustic, consisting of a thatch or tin roof and wood-plank walls.
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Technical training prepares you to work in Senegal by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Senegalese experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.  
  
Because villages are asked to furnish housing for Volunteers, the size, condition, and style of housing can vary widely. A few sites are located in the southern part of the country. The houses in the far south generally have thatch roofs, no running water and limited electricity if any.
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Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Senegal and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Senegalese agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.  
  
Some Volunteers are placed in District sites best characterized as small towns; or they may work in the capital city, Paramaribo. Volunteers living in these areas generally have access to running water and electricity day and night and other conveniences.
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===Language Training ===
  
==Training==
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As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical for your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. There-fore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.
  
''Main article: [[Training in Suriname]]''
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Senegalese instructors teach formal language classes six days a week in small groups of four to five people. Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.
  
Pre-service training (PST) consists of 12 weeks of intensive in-country training in five major areas: language (in Dutch, Sranan Tongo, Saramaccan, or Aucan), cross-cultural adaptation, technical skills, health, safety and security, and administration. Peace Corps/Suriname uses a community-based training (CBT) model. This means that most of your learning will take place at the community level and is experientially based. For most of the 12 weeks, you will stay with a Surinamese host family—sharing meals, language, and other experiences which provide an important opportunity for you to work on cultural understanding and adaptation. At least once a week you will return to a central training site to share experiences with other trainees, listen to guest speakers, and coordinate various training activities.
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===Cross-Cultural Training ===
  
Host families are carefully chosen by the training staff based on suggestions from current Peace Corps Volunteers. The families are carefully screened by the Peace Corps medical officer (PCMO) and the safety and security coordinator (SSC). Some of the families live within walking distance of the training site; others require the use of public transportation to reach the site. Most homes have electricity and running water (tap points). Since some people in these communities sleep in hammocks, it is possible you may sleep in one. PST staff is available to support you during this homestay. Staff members are important resources to help you process your experiences in cultural understanding and integration.
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As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Senegalese host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Senegal. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families. Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.  
  
Trainees are divided into two or three small groups or communities at a community-based training site. The site placement is based on the language you will need during your assignment. The language and technical trainers assigned to each training site conduct formal classes and support you in completing self-directed, community-based projects and activities. Although you will spend much of your time in language classes, you will also have classes on cross-cultural, technical, community development, and health and safety topics. Assignments and projects in the community will provide trainees with experiential learning based on the content of the classes.
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===Health Training ===
  
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During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Senegal. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.
  
==Health Care and Safety==
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===Safety Training ===
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Suriname]]''
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During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Suriname maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer and a medical assistant who support Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are available at local hospitals that meet American standards. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to Panama or to the United States.
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Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
  
 +
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
  
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
* In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
 +
* Midterm conference (a second in-service training): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
 +
* Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews Volunteers’ respective projects and personal experiences.
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Suriname]]''
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The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
  
In Suriname, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Suriname.
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[[Category:Senegal]]
 
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[[Category:Training|Senegal]]
Outside of Suriname’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to cultures and lifestyles of people from other countries. What people view as typical North American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Suriname are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
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* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
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* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
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* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
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==Frequently Asked Questions==
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{{Volunteersurvey2008
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|H1r=  67
+
|H1s=  51
+
|H2r=  67
+
|H2s=  58.6
+
|H3r=  67
+
|H3s=  48.5
+
|H4r=  66
+
|H4s=  89
+
|H5r=  67
+
|H5s=  31.3
+
|H6r=  65
+
|H6s=  53
+
}}
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''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Suriname]]''
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* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Suriname?
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* What is the electric current in Suriname?
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* How much money should I bring?
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* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
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* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
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* Do I need an international driver’s license?
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* What should I bring as gifts for Surinamese friends and my host family?
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* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
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* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
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* Can I call home from Suriname?
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* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
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* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
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==Packing List==
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''Main article: [[Packing list for Suriname]]''
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Suriname and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that every Volunteer’s experience is unique and that there is no perfect list. You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. The sort of work you expect to be doing—in both your official project and your secondary projects—should be your ultimate guide. You can always have things sent to you later.
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Suriname has a tropical climate with high humidity and rainfall. Temperatures range from 60 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit and tend to be cooler in the rain forest interior than along the coast. The climate in Suriname can ruin some items, so do not bring things you would be heartbroken to lose. Although Volunteers are expected to project a professional image at all times, dress in the capital of Paramaribo is more formal than in the interior communities. In the capital, Volunteers work in office settings where “smart casual” attire is appropriate (trousers and collared shirts for men; slacks or skirts and blouses for women). In the interior, clothing varies depending on the culture and the location of the community. Men tend to wear pants or shorts with T-shirts or other casual shirts and sandals or flip-flops, while women wear skirts with T-shirts or other tops and sandals or flip-flops.
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* General Clothing
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* For Men:
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* For Women
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* Shoes
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* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
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* Kitchen and Household Items
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* Miscellaneous
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* Things You May Be Glad You Brought
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==Peace Corps News==
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Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
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''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22suriname%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
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<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/ns/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
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==Country Fund==
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Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=568-CFD Suriname Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Suriname. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
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==See also==
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* [[Volunteers who served in Suriname]]
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* [[List of resources for Suriname]]
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* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
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[[Category:Suriname]] [[Category:The Caribbean]] [[Category:South America]]
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[[Category:Country]]
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Latest revision as of 07:57, 21 May 2014


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Senegal| |4}}]]

Pre-service training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The objective is to provide you with solid technical, language, and cross-cultural knowledge to prepare you for living and working successfully in Senegal. The training uses an experiential approach wherever possible; thus, rather than reading or hearing about Volunteer activities, you will practice, process, and evaluate actual or simulated activities.

A welcome committee led by the Peace Corps country director and the training director will meet you at the airport. The committee will help you collect your baggage, go through customs formalities, and load your baggage on rented buses.

Because trainees’ baggage has occasionally been left somewhere en route, we advise you to carry essential items, toiletries, and enough clothing for three days in your carry-on

luggage. Be certain to clearly and securely label all your baggage before checking it at the airport.

After leaving the airport, you will take a two-hour bus ride to Thiès, the location of the training center. You will stay at the center for your first three days in-country, when training will focus on an orientation to living with a host family; survival classes in Wolof, a local language; safety issues; a medical orientation; language placement interviews; and “getting to know you” activities.

At the end of the fourth day, you will travel upcountry to spend two or three nights in a village with one other trainee and a Volunteer host. You will have an opportunity to talk about the Peace Corps experience with your host and experience firsthand some of the skills required to succeed as a Volunteer. When you return to the training center on the eighth day, you will discuss your upcountry experience. You will then meet your host family at the training center, who will take you home to begin the home stay program.

You will have your own room, but the furniture in the room

will be minimal, just what you need to sleep. Trainees generally consider the home stay to be the most valuable training activity. Because the families do not speak English, we strongly recommend that you acquire at least a basic understanding of French prior to arriving in Senegal, whether through adult education courses, cassette tapes, or other means.

The training week is long and demanding, so come prepared to work hard. You will start at 8 a.m. and work till 6 p.m., with breaks throughout the day. On Saturdays, you will have classes from 8 a.m. until noon, with afternoons free. In general, language classes are in the morning and technical classes in the afternoon. You will have breakfast and lunch at the training center and dinner with your host family. You will walk to and from the training center every day, but organized transportation will be provided for the first couple of weeks to give you time to become familiar with the town. Pre-service training has four components: language, technical, cross-cultural, and personal health. Safety training is integrated into all these components, but particularly the cross-cultural and medical components. To facilitate language acquisition, the primary language spoken at the training center is French, a method known as language immersion. While immersion in French is the rule at the start of training, when trainees begin to learn African languages toward the end of training, they may speak both French and local languages at the center. Cross-cultural training is both hands-on and theoretical, with sessions to help you gain insight into and appreciation of Senegalese culture. Technical training also consists of theoretical sessions in the classroom and a lot of hands-on activities. Health training is delivered by a Peace Corps medical officer. The training staff will be available for support throughout the program and will provide feedback on your progress. You must attain required competencies all four components to be sworn in as a Volunteer. The key to a successful training is effort.

Members of the Peace Corps medical staff will visit the training center at least two days a week to offer consultations and facilitate sessions on personal health care. They will also vaccinate you against the various endemic diseases in the region. If an emergency occurs when members of the medical staff are not at the center, the training center staff will contact them by phone.

During training, when you are not doing fieldwork, you will be expected to wear neat, clean, and conservative clothing. Pants, shirts (including T-shirts), skirts, and dresses are fine, but shorts are appropriate only for recreational activities (e.g., jogging or soccer). You can receive mail at the training center’s post office box, but the center’s telephone is for official business only. You can make calls to the United States at the post office for approximately $7 per minute. Mail will be collected from the post office once a day on workdays. You will have to pay customs taxes of about $4 to $7 for any packages, depending on the items’ value. Peace Corps service is not for everyone. Training is a time for you to reevaluate your commitment to two years of service. Although training is very intense, it can also be a lot of fun. Be flexible and maintain a good sense of humor, and you will have a rewarding and enjoyable training experience.

Technical Training[edit]

Technical training prepares you to work in Senegal by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Senegalese experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Senegal and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Senegalese agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.

Language Training[edit]

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical for your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. There-fore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.

Senegalese instructors teach formal language classes six days a week in small groups of four to five people. Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.

Cross-Cultural Training[edit]

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Senegalese host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Senegal. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families. Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.

Health Training[edit]

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Senegal. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.

Safety Training[edit]

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:

  • In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
  • Midterm conference (a second in-service training): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
  • Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews Volunteers’ respective projects and personal experiences.

The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.