Difference between pages "Honduras" and "Packing list for Jordan"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
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{{Packing lists by country}}
|Countryname = Honduras
+
|CountryCode = ho
+
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
+
|Map = Ho-map.gif
+
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/hnwb522.pdf
+
|Region = [[Central America and Mexico]]
+
|CountryDirector = [[Trudy Jaycox]]
+
|Sectors = [[Protected Areas Management]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Menelio Bardales]])<br> [[Business Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Edel Perez-Campos]])<br> [[Municipal Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Alejandrina Carrasco]]) <br> [[Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Helmuth Castro]])<br> [[Water Sanitation and Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Martin Rivera]])<br> [[Youth Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Sandra Gomez]])
+
|ProgramDates = [[1963]] - [[Present]]
+
|CurrentlyServing = 194
+
|TotalVolunteers = 5375
+
|Languages = [[Mi`skito]], [[Spanish]]
+
|Flag = Honduras.GIF
+
|stagingdate= February 23 2011
+
|stagingcity= Atlanta
+
}}
+
  
 +
One of the most stressful tasks in preparing for Peace Corps service is deciding what to pack and what to leave behind. Generally, packing involves a gradual whittling process as more and more items shift from the "Necessities" pile to the "If There’s Room..." pile. The following list has been compiled by Volunteers currently serving in [[Jordan]], based on their experience. There is no perfect list! Please use it as a guide, bearing in mind that experience is individual and tastes differ. Do not try to bring everything on this list; consider only those items that make sense to you personally. Peace Corps will not reimburse you for overweight baggage. Remember, you can get everything you will really need, and most of what you will really want, here in Jordan.
  
Honduras offers natural scenic beauty and variety as well as a favorable climate in a semitropical setting. The Peace Corps has enjoyed a long and proud history in Honduras. More than 5,000 Volunteers have served as since the inception of the program in 1963.
+
===General Clothing ===
  
Peace Corps/Honduras works in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and child survival, business, protected area management, water and sanitation, municipal development, and youth development. Volunteers in these six projects work in an integrated community development framework, meeting the expressed needs of the communities where they serve.  
+
Dress is more conservative and formal than you might think and suggestions from recently arrived Volunteers are listed below. Your appearance is very important as a sign of respect and your effectiveness can be influenced by how you present yourself. Both men and women are expected to look “sharp” with clothes clean and unwrinkled. It gets quite cold in the winter and there is no central heating in the centers or schools. Dressing in layers is key! Any additional clothing you may need is readily available in-country at retail and second-hand shops. However, good quality cotton underwear is generally expensive and hard to find. Laundry facilities are limited, so clothing that can be easily washed by hand and air dried is a good choice. You can wear the same things repeatedly, so pack lightly!
  
* [http://www.grosir-kosmetik.com/63-been-pink-beauty-series.html Been pink]
 
* [http://www.tokobungasabana.com Toko bunga jakarta]
 
* [http://www.tokobungasabana.com Toko bunga online]
 
* [http://www.awanirentcar.com/pricelist Sewa mobil jakarta]
 
  
==Peace Corps History==
 
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Honduras]]''
+
===Both men and women ===
  
Times have changed since the first lady of Honduras, Doña Alejandra Bermudez de Villeda Morales, accompanied the first training class of Peace Corps Volunteers to Honduras in 1962. Over the past 43 years, more than 5,000 Volunteers have served in Honduras in a wide range of project areas, including health, fisheries, beekeeping, animal husbandry, special education, vocational education, small business, and agriculture. Project areas and numbers of Volunteers have changed in response to the changing needs of the country. Projects such as fisheries, beekeeping, and education were phased out as Honduran people and institutions developed the capacity to continue the work on their own. Other projects, such as municipal development, HIV/AIDS prevention, and business development, have been initiated or have evolved with technological advances, increased globalization of world markets, and other developments.
+
* A warm coat, as well as a lightweight, waterproof jacket
 +
* At least two heavy wool sweaters so that you have one to wear while the other is in the wash or drying
 +
* Silk or cotton thermal underwear—they pack tightly and are quick drying. They can also double as sleeping outfits during the winter
 +
* Scarves for warmth
 +
* Turtlenecks
 +
* Jeans; a pair or two
 +
* Wool socks
 +
* A bathing suit (Women should bring shorts and T-shirt to wear over their suit. Men’s bathing suits should be baggy, knee-length)
 +
* Summer hats
 +
* Knitted hat, gloves or mittens
 +
* Loosely tailored pants or khakis and lined pants for winter
 +
* One dressier outfit (for women, either pants or long skirt; for men, a sports jacket/blazer and dress slacks plus a tie) and dress shoes. These will be worn for the occaisional official reception, swearing-in ceremony, and other important functions.  
  
In response to the crisis caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, the number of Volunteers in Honduras increased dramatically. Today an average of 200 Volunteers work in the western, eastern, and southern regions of Honduras. In 2003 Peace Corps/Honduras expanded its program to the north coast of Honduras.
+
===Suggestions for Women===
  
There are two published Peace Corps Experience books in print. "Triumph and Hope; Golden Years With the Peace Corps Honduras," by Barbara E. Joe describes service between 2000 and 2002 (Barbara Joe, 2008). "South of the Frontera; A Peace Corps Memoir" by Lawrence F. Lihosit describes service between 1975 and 1977 (iUniverse, NY, 2010).
+
Covering up is important and may feel strange at first, but neatness and appropriate dress will enhance your credibility and smooth your integration. All clothing must be loose fitting for comfort and modesty, but still look neat.  
  
 +
* Shirts/blouses: Any top worn on the outside needs to be thigh-length (in other words, covering your behind), loose (masking your shape); and long sleeved. Layers can extend your wardrobe and keep you warmer in winter. Collars or high necklines are important; do not bring anything sheer or opaque (really check yourself in the mirror)
 +
* Dresses/skirts: must be long enough to cover the ankle; side slits must be sewn up
 +
* Pants: loose and long enough to cover the ankle
 +
* Short-sleeved or tank tops only to wear under long-sleeved tops
 +
* Lightweight, long-sleeved jackets for wearing over short-sleeved shirts
 +
* A few pairs of black slacks
 +
* A long cotton slip
 +
* Tights (hard to find here), dress socks, and knee-high stockings (preferably black)
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
Suggestions for Men
 +
* Tie, belt, dress socks
 +
* Nice short-sleeved dress shirts for summer months
 +
* Professional-looking jacket for warmth and also for the workplace Shoes
 +
* Comfortable, nice dress shoes for work (closed toe; black is best; avoid suede shoes due to dust and scuffing)
 +
* Sturdy sandals 
 +
* All-purpose shoes (something to walk, run, bike, or hike in)
 +
* Flip-flops or slipper sandals for use in the bathroom (can be purchased cheaply in Jordan)
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Honduras]]''
+
Note: When you enter a person’s house, you normally take off your shoes. Bring shoes that are easy to put on and take off.
  
Volunteer housing varies according to the area of the country and its climate. In much of the southern region, houses are open and airy to provide ventilation. Houses tend to be more closed in mountainous areas. Some Volunteers live in houses made of adobe, while others live in houses made of wood or cinder blocks or in apartments. Roofing generally consists of clay tiles or corrugated metal. Most Volunteer houses have electricity and running water, though the source of water is often outside the house and water may flow only sporadically. Housing in rural sites may have outdoor latrines instead of indoor plumbing.
+
===Exercise Clothing===
  
Peace Corps/Honduras will provide Volunteers with one secure housing option upon site assignment where Volunteers must live for at least the first two months. Peace Corps/Honduras may also suggest other housing options that can be explored by Volunteers after the initial two-month period. Volunteers will not be assigned to communities where adequate housing is not available.
+
Once settled at site, some Volunteers participate in individual and organized sports. You should bring modest exercise clothes, including sweatpants and sleeved shirts. Do not expect to wear running shorts and tank tops as exercise apparel.  
  
The Peace Corps expects Volunteers to use good judgment in deciding where and with whom to live after the initial time period. Volunteers are strongly encouraged to live with a family and to take the necessary time to choose a living situation that considers community norms, language acquisition, and personal safety.
+
===Miscellaneous ===
  
During the site-selection process, project teams will determine the availability of adequate housing. If no options are available, the site will not host a Volunteer. Safe and secure housing is a priority, and Peace Corps/Honduras will help you work with the landlord to make any necessary modifications to improve the safety and security of your home, such as adding deadbolt locks and bars on windows. Additionally, the Peace Corps makes an effort to select sites that offer reasonable and safe transportation. Keep in mind that rural areas of Honduras are more rustic than rural areas of the United States.
+
* A lightweight towel and washcloth (travel towel is good)
 +
* Decorations for your house (pictures, maps, etc.)
 +
* At least 12 passport-size photos (inexpensive kind available in portable photo booths are adequate). You will need them for your Peace Corps identification, obtaining visas to other countries, medical charts, and the Jordanian residence permit
 +
* Good-quality backpack for travel, as well as a smaller daypack
 +
* Baseball, football, Frisbee, hackeysack, or travel games such as Uno
 +
* Camera (film and processing are readily available, but Volunteers recommend bringing a supply of film)
 +
* Sewing items (iron-on mending tape, straight and safety pins, etc.)
 +
* Rechargeable batteries and recharger (with power converter)
 +
* Pocket calculator (preferably solar-powered)
 +
* Small, battery-powered alarm clock or wristwatch
 +
* Duct tape (can be bought in Amman, but costly)
 +
* Compact sleeping bag
 +
* A few good books, which can be traded at or donated to the Volunteer book exchange 106 
 +
* Family photographs (screen these for appropriateness to Jordanian culture. For example, photos of beach scenes with minimally clothed people or scenes with alcohol consumption will be viewed as inappropriate by many Jordanians) Maybe get them laminated because they'll be passed around a lot!
 +
* U.S. stamps (for sending mail via anyone traveling to U.S.)
 +
* Swiss Army, Leatherman, or an equivalent multipurpose knife
 +
* Favorite stove-top recipes and cookbook (Peace Corps provides a stove top, but not an oven, although it can be purchased separately)
 +
* Journal, diary, or schedule book
 +
* Jump rope, yoga mat, round ball, or any small and light exercise equipment (as an alternative to jogging, which may not be a viable option)
 +
* Small, retractable tape measure
 +
* Items such as scotch tape, scissors, crayons, and markers for teachers (you can buy lower quality here)
 +
* Polarized sunglasses
 +
* Travel guides of countries you'll want to visit during vacation
 +
* Measuring cups, spoons, etc.  
 +
* One or two sets of double-sized bed sheets and pillow cases
 +
* Pocket-size dictionary and thesaurus
 +
* Maps (good for wall hangings and traveling)
 +
* Money belt or other means of concealing passport and valuables when traveling
 +
* Favorite music CDs or tapes
  
Peace Corps Volunteer sites are located throughout Honduras with the exception of the departments of Gracias a Dios and the Bay Islands. The site in which you eventually serve will be selected based upon the local needs of the community, your skills and interests, and the overall goals and objectives of the Peace Corps/Honduras project in which you will work.
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
  
==Training==
+
Many imported items (L’Oreal, Neutrogena, Nivea, Colgate, Tampax, Always, etc.) are widely available, but they are expensive relative to your Volunteer living allowance. Contact lens solution is also available, but expensive. Tampons are available, but very expensive. If you plan to use them, it is not a bad idea to bring a good supply.
  
''Main article: [[Training in Honduras]]''
+
If you wear contact lenses and use regular saline solution, you can buy bags of saline (like those used in IV's) at any pharmacy.  This is much cheaper than actual contact lens solution.  Just be sure to keep a bottle so you can refill it with the bagged solution.
  
Prior to becoming a Volunteer, you will participate in an 11week training program in Honduras. Pre-service training (PST) incorporates experiential learning and adult learning methodology that is meant to challenge you while preparing you to begin your work as a Volunteer. Though pre-service training can be taxing at times, Peace Corps/Honduras works to ensure that it is challenging and fun.
+
* Makeup (the quality here is okay; if you are picky, pack it)
 +
* Scissors or other hair-cutting device. Every group seems to have at least one person who can cut hair, but you need good scissors to do so
 +
* Three-month supply of any prescription medications
  
Upon arrival in Honduras, trainees move in with host families after a brief introductory session. The first four weeks of training take place in a large group and include trainees from various projects. In the fifth week, most trainees will move to other communities for field-based training, which focuses on the practical application of project technical skills.
+
===Electronics ===
  
Although you were recruited for a particular project and your training will be tailored to the requirements of that project, all Volunteers are considered to be community development facilitators. You will receive theoretical and hands-on training in community analysis, participatory analysis, gender analysis, community development, and integrated community development and become familiar with current development efforts in Honduras. As the weeks pass, you may find that you need to adapt both existing skills and new skills to the work environment in Honduras.
+
If you plan to bring any small appliances, such as hair dryers, electric shavers, or contact lens disinfecters, get a voltage converter. The power is adequate for laptop computers with AC/ DC adapters. CD/cassette players can be purchased in Jordan, but are slightly more expensive than in the U.S. If you choose to bring one, make sure you have a voltage converter since batteries are expensive. Hairdryers and irons are readily available.  
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
* Radio with shortwave and medium-wave (A decent shortwave radio will pick up VOA, BBC, and the Jordanian English station)
 +
* Laptop computer. Bring one at your own risk. Power surges are common, so bring a good surge protector.
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Honduras]]''
+
Get personal insurance; Peace Corps does not insure/ replace personal items
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Honduras maintains a clinic with four full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary health-care needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and treatment, are also available at regional medical facilities. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a major hospital in the capital and then, if necessary, medically evacuated to the United States.
+
* Discman with speakers. This can be bought here, but it may make your plane ride more pleasant if you pack it
  
 
+
[[Category:Jordan]]
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Honduras]]''
+
 
+
In Honduras, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Honduras.
+
 
+
Outside of Honduras’ capital and other large cities, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is viewed as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Honduras are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
+
 
+
To ease the transition and adapt to life in Honduras, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.
+
 
+
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
+
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
+
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
+
* Possible Issues for Married Volunteers
+
 
+
 
+
==Frequently Asked Questions==
+
 
+
{{Volunteersurvey2008
+
|H1r=  48
+
|H1s=  70.3
+
|H2r=  38
+
|H2s=  83
+
|H3r=  46
+
|H3s=  82.4
+
|H4r=  26
+
|H4s=  106.6
+
|H5r=  35
+
|H5s=  53.2
+
|H6r=  50
+
|H6s=  75.4
+
}}
+
 
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Honduras]]''
+
 
+
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Honduras?
+
* What is the electric current in Honduras?
+
* How much money should I bring?
+
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
+
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
+
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
+
* What should I bring as gifts for Honduran friends and my host family?
+
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
+
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
+
* Can I call home from Honduras?
+
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
+
 
+
 
+
 
+
==Packing List==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Packing list for Honduras]]''
+
 
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Honduras and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Honduras.
+
 
+
Your clothes should be sturdy enough to hold up under rough wear and laundry techniques and free of the need for ironing. The amount of professional versus casual clothing you bring should be based on personal preference and on the type of work you will be doing. For example, a water and sanitation Volunteer probably needs more casual clothes for work than does a small business Volunteer. Shorts are acceptable in limited circumstances, but especially in larger towns and for athletic activities. Women, however, should also bring sweatpants that are comfortable to work out in. Note that big and tall sizes are often difficult to find in Honduras, as are women’s shoes larger than size 8 and men’s shoes larger than size 10-1/2. Because there are many good tailors and seamstresses in Honduras who can make many styles at a reasonable price, you may want to bring patterns or pictures of clothing that they can copy or adapt for you.
+
 
+
* General Clothing
+
* For Men
+
* Shoes
+
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
+
* Kitchen
+
* Miscellaneous
+
 
+
 
+
==Peace Corps News==
+
 
+
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
+
 
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22honduras%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
 
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/ho/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
+
 
+
==Country Fund==
+
 
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=522-CFD Honduras Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Honduras. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
 
+
==See also==
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Honduras]]
+
* [[Amigos de Honduras]]
+
* [[List of resources for Honduras]]
+
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
+
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
+
 
+
 
+
==External links==
+
* [http://www.pccatrachos.com/ Honduras Homepage]
+
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ho.html Peace Corps Journals - Honduras]
+
* [http://groups.yahoo.com/group/volscatrachos/ Volscatrachos Yahoo Group]
+
[[Category:Honduras]] [[Category:Central America and Mexico]]
+
[[Category:Country]]
+

Latest revision as of 07:56, 21 May 2014


Packing List for [[{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]

Packing Lists by Country

These lists has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]] based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]
[[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}}|}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}|}}.svg|50px|none]]

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category:{{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Jordan| |5}}]]

One of the most stressful tasks in preparing for Peace Corps service is deciding what to pack and what to leave behind. Generally, packing involves a gradual whittling process as more and more items shift from the "Necessities" pile to the "If There’s Room..." pile. The following list has been compiled by Volunteers currently serving in Jordan, based on their experience. There is no perfect list! Please use it as a guide, bearing in mind that experience is individual and tastes differ. Do not try to bring everything on this list; consider only those items that make sense to you personally. Peace Corps will not reimburse you for overweight baggage. Remember, you can get everything you will really need, and most of what you will really want, here in Jordan.

General Clothing[edit]

Dress is more conservative and formal than you might think and suggestions from recently arrived Volunteers are listed below. Your appearance is very important as a sign of respect and your effectiveness can be influenced by how you present yourself. Both men and women are expected to look “sharp” with clothes clean and unwrinkled. It gets quite cold in the winter and there is no central heating in the centers or schools. Dressing in layers is key! Any additional clothing you may need is readily available in-country at retail and second-hand shops. However, good quality cotton underwear is generally expensive and hard to find. Laundry facilities are limited, so clothing that can be easily washed by hand and air dried is a good choice. You can wear the same things repeatedly, so pack lightly!


Both men and women[edit]

  • A warm coat, as well as a lightweight, waterproof jacket
  • At least two heavy wool sweaters so that you have one to wear while the other is in the wash or drying
  • Silk or cotton thermal underwear—they pack tightly and are quick drying. They can also double as sleeping outfits during the winter
  • Scarves for warmth
  • Turtlenecks
  • Jeans; a pair or two
  • Wool socks
  • A bathing suit (Women should bring shorts and T-shirt to wear over their suit. Men’s bathing suits should be baggy, knee-length)
  • Summer hats
  • Knitted hat, gloves or mittens
  • Loosely tailored pants or khakis and lined pants for winter
  • One dressier outfit (for women, either pants or long skirt; for men, a sports jacket/blazer and dress slacks plus a tie) and dress shoes. These will be worn for the occaisional official reception, swearing-in ceremony, and other important functions.

Suggestions for Women[edit]

Covering up is important and may feel strange at first, but neatness and appropriate dress will enhance your credibility and smooth your integration. All clothing must be loose fitting for comfort and modesty, but still look neat.

  • Shirts/blouses: Any top worn on the outside needs to be thigh-length (in other words, covering your behind), loose (masking your shape); and long sleeved. Layers can extend your wardrobe and keep you warmer in winter. Collars or high necklines are important; do not bring anything sheer or opaque (really check yourself in the mirror)
  • Dresses/skirts: must be long enough to cover the ankle; side slits must be sewn up
  • Pants: loose and long enough to cover the ankle
  • Short-sleeved or tank tops only to wear under long-sleeved tops
  • Lightweight, long-sleeved jackets for wearing over short-sleeved shirts
  • A few pairs of black slacks
  • A long cotton slip
  • Tights (hard to find here), dress socks, and knee-high stockings (preferably black)

Suggestions for Men

  • Tie, belt, dress socks
  • Nice short-sleeved dress shirts for summer months
  • Professional-looking jacket for warmth and also for the workplace Shoes
  • Comfortable, nice dress shoes for work (closed toe; black is best; avoid suede shoes due to dust and scuffing)
  • Sturdy sandals
  • All-purpose shoes (something to walk, run, bike, or hike in)
  • Flip-flops or slipper sandals for use in the bathroom (can be purchased cheaply in Jordan)

Note: When you enter a person’s house, you normally take off your shoes. Bring shoes that are easy to put on and take off.

Exercise Clothing[edit]

Once settled at site, some Volunteers participate in individual and organized sports. You should bring modest exercise clothes, including sweatpants and sleeved shirts. Do not expect to wear running shorts and tank tops as exercise apparel.

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • A lightweight towel and washcloth (travel towel is good)
  • Decorations for your house (pictures, maps, etc.)
  • At least 12 passport-size photos (inexpensive kind available in portable photo booths are adequate). You will need them for your Peace Corps identification, obtaining visas to other countries, medical charts, and the Jordanian residence permit
  • Good-quality backpack for travel, as well as a smaller daypack
  • Baseball, football, Frisbee, hackeysack, or travel games such as Uno
  • Camera (film and processing are readily available, but Volunteers recommend bringing a supply of film)
  • Sewing items (iron-on mending tape, straight and safety pins, etc.)
  • Rechargeable batteries and recharger (with power converter)
  • Pocket calculator (preferably solar-powered)
  • Small, battery-powered alarm clock or wristwatch
  • Duct tape (can be bought in Amman, but costly)
  • Compact sleeping bag
  • A few good books, which can be traded at or donated to the Volunteer book exchange 106
  • Family photographs (screen these for appropriateness to Jordanian culture. For example, photos of beach scenes with minimally clothed people or scenes with alcohol consumption will be viewed as inappropriate by many Jordanians) Maybe get them laminated because they'll be passed around a lot!
  • U.S. stamps (for sending mail via anyone traveling to U.S.)
  • Swiss Army, Leatherman, or an equivalent multipurpose knife
  • Favorite stove-top recipes and cookbook (Peace Corps provides a stove top, but not an oven, although it can be purchased separately)
  • Journal, diary, or schedule book
  • Jump rope, yoga mat, round ball, or any small and light exercise equipment (as an alternative to jogging, which may not be a viable option)
  • Small, retractable tape measure
  • Items such as scotch tape, scissors, crayons, and markers for teachers (you can buy lower quality here)
  • Polarized sunglasses
  • Travel guides of countries you'll want to visit during vacation
  • Measuring cups, spoons, etc.
  • One or two sets of double-sized bed sheets and pillow cases
  • Pocket-size dictionary and thesaurus
  • Maps (good for wall hangings and traveling)
  • Money belt or other means of concealing passport and valuables when traveling
  • Favorite music CDs or tapes

Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items[edit]

Many imported items (L’Oreal, Neutrogena, Nivea, Colgate, Tampax, Always, etc.) are widely available, but they are expensive relative to your Volunteer living allowance. Contact lens solution is also available, but expensive. Tampons are available, but very expensive. If you plan to use them, it is not a bad idea to bring a good supply.

If you wear contact lenses and use regular saline solution, you can buy bags of saline (like those used in IV's) at any pharmacy. This is much cheaper than actual contact lens solution. Just be sure to keep a bottle so you can refill it with the bagged solution.

  • Makeup (the quality here is okay; if you are picky, pack it)
  • Scissors or other hair-cutting device. Every group seems to have at least one person who can cut hair, but you need good scissors to do so
  • Three-month supply of any prescription medications

Electronics[edit]

If you plan to bring any small appliances, such as hair dryers, electric shavers, or contact lens disinfecters, get a voltage converter. The power is adequate for laptop computers with AC/ DC adapters. CD/cassette players can be purchased in Jordan, but are slightly more expensive than in the U.S. If you choose to bring one, make sure you have a voltage converter since batteries are expensive. Hairdryers and irons are readily available.

  • Radio with shortwave and medium-wave (A decent shortwave radio will pick up VOA, BBC, and the Jordanian English station)
  • Laptop computer. Bring one at your own risk. Power surges are common, so bring a good surge protector.

Get personal insurance; Peace Corps does not insure/ replace personal items

  • Discman with speakers. This can be bought here, but it may make your plane ride more pleasant if you pack it