Difference between pages "Burkina Faso" and "Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
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{{Diversity_and_cross-cultural_issues_by_country}}
|Countryname=Burkina Faso
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In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as American as the other despite our many differences.  
|CountryCode= uv
+
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
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|Map = Uv-map.gif
+
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/bfwb686.pdf
+
|Region = [[Africa]]
+
|CountryDirector = [[Shannon Meehan]]
+
|Sectors = [[Business|Small Economic Development]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Daniel Rooney]])<br> [[Education|Secondary Education]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Sebraogo Kiendrebeogo]])<br> [[Education|Girls Education]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Zallia Mantoro]]) <br> [[Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Claude Millogo]])
+
|ProgramDates = [[1966]] - [[1987]]<br>[[1995]] - [[Present]]
+
|CurrentlyServing = 97
+
|TotalVolunteers = 1521
+
|Languages = [[Bissa]], [[Dioula]], [[French]], [[Fulfude]], [[Gourounssi]], [[Gulmancema]], [[Jula]], [[Kurunfe]], [[Lobiri]], [[Lyele]], [[Mòoré]]
+
|Flag = Flag_of_Burkina_Faso.svg
+
|stagingdate= Jun 9 2010
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|stagingcity= Washington, DC
+
}}
+
  
Peace Corps resumed work in Burkina Faso in 1995 after an eight-year absence. Upon request of the government, Volunteers arrived to work in primary healthcare in rural communities.
+
Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Ukraine, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Ukraine.  
  
Two years later, the Ministry <span class="plainlinks">[http://goo.gl/LRCVw<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] of Secondary Education requested Volunteers to work with middle schools, high schools, a teacher-training college, and a university to make up for large shortfalls in qualified teachers.
+
Outside of Ukraine’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may also be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Ukraine are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
  
In 2003, the government and Peace Corps collaborated to start a small enterprise development project in microfinance and agribusiness. The girls' education and empowerment program began in 2005 in collaboration with the Ministry of Basic Education.
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To ease the transition and adapt to life in Ukraine, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental, compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these types of challenges. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.  
  
 +
===Overview of Diversity in Ukraine ===
  
 +
During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
===What Might a Volunteer Face? ===
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Burkina Faso]]''
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The comments in this section, which come from a cross-section of Volunteers who have served in Ukraine, are intended to stimulate thought and discussion. They reflect the fact that each person’s experience of Peace Corps service is unique.
  
The Peace Corps entered Burkina Faso, then called Upper Volta, in 1967 and operated there uninterrupted for 20 years. Major projects included forestry extension, young farmer education, small enterprise development, secondary education (math, science, and English language), water well construction, agricultural and environmental extension, arts and crafts, basketball coaching, and parks development. In June 1986, the government of Burkina Faso asked the Peace Corps to cease sending Volunteers because the Peace Corps’ programs no longer <span class="plainlinks">[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Jerry_Shey<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] coincided with Burkina Faso’s development goals. The 30 Volunteers in the country completed their service in 1987. In 1995, 19 trainees arrived in Burkina Faso as part of a newly established health project. One year later, the Peace Corps established a secondary education project in response to the government’s urgent request for teachers. In 2003, in response to government initiatives and articulated local needs, a small enterprise development project began with 15 trainees. A girls’ education project started in 2005. Currently, nearly 170 Volunteers work throughout the country, primarily in rural areas. Approximately 1,500 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in Burkina Faso to date.
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====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers ====
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
At first, gender roles in Ukraine can be difficult to understand and accept. Ukrainian culture may appear to be discriminatory. Ukrainian women constitute more than 50 percent of the total population, and working women outnumber nonworking women. Although men and women may receive equal pay for equal work, women are underrepresented in positions of power and often are not promoted as readily as men to managerial positions. These gender differences, sometimes overt and sometimes subtle, can present problems for Volunteers in job situations. 
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Burkina Faso]]''
+
====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color ====
  
The government ministry to which you are assigned or your community will provide you with safe and adequate housing in accordance with the Peace Corps’ site selection criteria. The majority of health Volunteers live in small rural villages, while education Volunteers tend to live in larger villages and towns. Volunteer housing is typically a small house made of mud or cement bricks with a thatch or tin roof. Many Volunteers do not have running water or electricity; they draw their water from a well and obtain light through kerosene lanterns. Nearly all Volunteers are within one hour of a neighboring Volunteer and eight hours of the Peace Corps office in Ouagadougou by public transport.
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Racial and ethnic minorities in Ukraine—primarily Poles, Hungarians, Crimean Tatars, and Greeks—make up about 5 percent of the total population. They are not always well-organized and are not usually recognized as separate communities. Crimean Tatars are the exception, as they are becoming a more significant facet of the population in Crimea.  
  
 +
In spite of the racial diversity of the former Soviet Union and Ukraine’s close contacts with former socialist countries in Asia and Africa, most Ukrainians have not had personal interactions with people of other races. They often assume that African-American or Asian-American Volunteers are university students from Africa or Asia rather than Americans. Thus minority Volunteers may be stopped to show their identification papers more frequently than other Volunteers, particularly in larger cities where they are not known. In addition, “skinhead” groups in some larger cities have reportedly targeted individuals of African or Asian heritage in the past. 
  
 +
====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers ====
  
==Training==
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Older people in Ukraine are generally respected and seen as sources of wisdom. So older Volunteers often have a greater degree of credibility upon arrival at their sites.  The slow pace of change in a developing country, however, may prove challenging for some individuals. In addition, certain conditions in Ukraine—uneven pavement, multistory buildings without elevators, tobacco smoke and other air pollutants, and lack of amenities—combine to make life more demanding than in the United States. 
  
''Main article: [[Training in Burkina Faso]]''
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====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers ====
  
During the first several days of training, you will stay at a training center or hotel in the capital. After this orientation period, you will move to Ouahigouya, a regional capital north of Ouagadougou. Trainees will be placed in clusters of four to five people along with a language and cross-culture facilitator. Health and girls’ education clusters will be located in villages a short distance from Ouahigouya. Clusters of small enterprise development and secondary education trainees will most likely be based in Ouahigouya.
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Homosexuality was decriminalized in Ukraine in 1991. However, this often is not acknowledged, and civil rights related to sexual orientation are limited. The gay communities in Kyiv and other large cities are becoming more open, and in 1999 Nash Mir, the first gay nongovernmental organization, received official state registration. Some gay and lesbian Volunteers in Ukraine have found that being open about their sexual orientation at their sites has had a negative impact on their effectiveness.
  
Trainees will be assigned to a host family where they will live for the duration of pre-service training. The host family experience, which Volunteers in Burkina Faso consider one of the most critical elements of training, allows you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire. Most Volunteers remain in close contact with their host families throughout their service.
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====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers ====
  
At the beginning of training, the training staff will outline the goals that each trainee has to achieve before becoming a Volunteer and the criteria that will be used to assess progress toward those goals. The training director, along with the language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers, will work with you toward the highest possible achievement of training goals by providing you with feedback throughout training. After successful completion of pre-service training, you will be sworn-in as a Volunteer and make final preparations to depart for your site.  
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Many Ukrainians have little knowledge or understanding of non-Christian faiths. Religious observances are prevalent in schools and communities, particularly in western Ukraine.  There are Polish and Greek Catholic churches and Ukrainian Orthodox churches in most communities. Most big cities have large numbers of Christian missionaries, particularly from evangelical denominations. Volunteers are sometimes mistaken for missionaries, and the Peace Corps is careful to maintain a separation from such groups. If you do not attend church, Ukrainians may demand that you explain why, but it is possible to politely decline when invited to attend someone’s church if you choose not to.  
  
 +
====Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities====
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
As a disabled Volunteer in Ukraine, you may face a special set of challenges. In Ukraine, as in other parts of the world, some people hold prejudicial attitudes about individuals with disabilities and may discriminate against them. And there is very little of the infrastructure to accommodate individuals with disabilities that has been developed in the United States.
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Burkina Faso]]''
+
That being said, as part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodation, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Ukraine without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. The Peace Corps/Ukraine staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in their training, housing, job sites, or in other areas, to enable them to serve safely and effectively.
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Burkina Faso maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Burkina Faso at local, American-standard hospitals. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.
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[[Category:Ukraine]]
 
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==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Burkina Faso]]''
+
 
+
In Burkina Faso, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics considered familiar and commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Burkina Faso.
+
 
+
Outside of Burkina Faso’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Burkina Faso are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
+
 
+
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
+
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
+
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
+
 
+
 
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==Frequently Asked Questions==
+
 
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{{Volunteersurvey2008
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|H1r=  22
+
|H1s=  75.3
+
|H2r=  25
+
|H2s=  85.3
+
|H3r=  32
+
|H3s=  84.9
+
|H4r=  50
+
|H4s=  102.5
+
|H5r=  9
+
|H5s=  59.6
+
|H6r=  11
+
|H6s=  97
+
}}
+
 
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Burkina Faso]]''
+
 
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* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Burkina Faso?
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* What is the electric current in Burkina Faso?
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* How much money should I bring?
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* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
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* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
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* Do I need an international driver’s license?
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* What should I bring as gifts for Burkina Faso friends and my host family?
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* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
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* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
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* Can I call home from Burkina Faso?
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* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
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* Should I bring my computer?
+
 
+
 
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==Packing List==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Packing list for Burkina Faso]]''
+
 
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Burkina Faso and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Burkina Faso.
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* Clothes
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* Women
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* Toiletries
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* General
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* Books
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* Food
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* You also might want...
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* And if you really like to bike...
+
 
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==Peace Corps News==
+
 
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Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
+
 
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22burkina+faso%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
 
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/uv/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
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==Country Fund==
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Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=686-CFD Burkina Faso Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Burkina Faso. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
 
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==See also==
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* [[Volunteers who served in Burkina Faso]]
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* [[Burkina Faso sites|Sites where volunteers have served in Burkina Faso]]
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* [[The Friends of Burkina Faso]]
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* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
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* [[List of resources for Burkina Faso]]
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
+
 
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==External links==
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* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/uv.html Peace Corps Journals - Burkina Faso]
+
 
+
[[Category:Burkina Faso]] [[Category:Africa]]
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[[Category:Country]]
+

Revision as of 16:18, 11 January 2010

Diversity and cross-cultural issues in [[{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with their host countries, Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]
See also:
[[Category:{{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |5}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |6}} {{#explode:Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Ukraine| |7}}]]

In fulfilling its mandate to share the face of America with host countries, the Peace Corps is making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as American as the other despite our many differences.

Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Ukraine, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Ukraine.

Outside of Ukraine’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may also be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Ukraine are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

To ease the transition and adapt to life in Ukraine, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental, compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these types of challenges. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.

Overview of Diversity in Ukraine

During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.

What Might a Volunteer Face?

The comments in this section, which come from a cross-section of Volunteers who have served in Ukraine, are intended to stimulate thought and discussion. They reflect the fact that each person’s experience of Peace Corps service is unique.

Possible Issues for Female Volunteers

At first, gender roles in Ukraine can be difficult to understand and accept. Ukrainian culture may appear to be discriminatory. Ukrainian women constitute more than 50 percent of the total population, and working women outnumber nonworking women. Although men and women may receive equal pay for equal work, women are underrepresented in positions of power and often are not promoted as readily as men to managerial positions. These gender differences, sometimes overt and sometimes subtle, can present problems for Volunteers in job situations.

Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color

Racial and ethnic minorities in Ukraine—primarily Poles, Hungarians, Crimean Tatars, and Greeks—make up about 5 percent of the total population. They are not always well-organized and are not usually recognized as separate communities. Crimean Tatars are the exception, as they are becoming a more significant facet of the population in Crimea.

In spite of the racial diversity of the former Soviet Union and Ukraine’s close contacts with former socialist countries in Asia and Africa, most Ukrainians have not had personal interactions with people of other races. They often assume that African-American or Asian-American Volunteers are university students from Africa or Asia rather than Americans. Thus minority Volunteers may be stopped to show their identification papers more frequently than other Volunteers, particularly in larger cities where they are not known. In addition, “skinhead” groups in some larger cities have reportedly targeted individuals of African or Asian heritage in the past.

Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers

Older people in Ukraine are generally respected and seen as sources of wisdom. So older Volunteers often have a greater degree of credibility upon arrival at their sites. The slow pace of change in a developing country, however, may prove challenging for some individuals. In addition, certain conditions in Ukraine—uneven pavement, multistory buildings without elevators, tobacco smoke and other air pollutants, and lack of amenities—combine to make life more demanding than in the United States.

Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers

Homosexuality was decriminalized in Ukraine in 1991. However, this often is not acknowledged, and civil rights related to sexual orientation are limited. The gay communities in Kyiv and other large cities are becoming more open, and in 1999 Nash Mir, the first gay nongovernmental organization, received official state registration. Some gay and lesbian Volunteers in Ukraine have found that being open about their sexual orientation at their sites has had a negative impact on their effectiveness.

Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers

Many Ukrainians have little knowledge or understanding of non-Christian faiths. Religious observances are prevalent in schools and communities, particularly in western Ukraine. There are Polish and Greek Catholic churches and Ukrainian Orthodox churches in most communities. Most big cities have large numbers of Christian missionaries, particularly from evangelical denominations. Volunteers are sometimes mistaken for missionaries, and the Peace Corps is careful to maintain a separation from such groups. If you do not attend church, Ukrainians may demand that you explain why, but it is possible to politely decline when invited to attend someone’s church if you choose not to.

Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities

As a disabled Volunteer in Ukraine, you may face a special set of challenges. In Ukraine, as in other parts of the world, some people hold prejudicial attitudes about individuals with disabilities and may discriminate against them. And there is very little of the infrastructure to accommodate individuals with disabilities that has been developed in the United States.

That being said, as part of the medical clearance process, the Peace Corps Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable, with or without reasonable accommodation, to perform a full tour of Volunteer service in Ukraine without unreasonable risk of harm to yourself or interruption of your service. The Peace Corps/Ukraine staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations for them in their training, housing, job sites, or in other areas, to enable them to serve safely and effectively.