Difference between pages "Daniel L. Manske" and "Erik W. Lang"

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{{Volunteerinfobox
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{{DEFAULTSORT:Lang, Erik}}
|firstname=Daniel
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|middlename=L.
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{{quickbar
|lastname= Manske
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|Volunteer=   Erik W. Lang
|country=    Botswana
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|Country=    Guatemela
|yearservicestarted=1981
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|Years=       1988-1990
|yearserviceended=1983
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|Group=      YOUR GROUP NUMBER OR CODE
|groupcode=      July '81
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|Site=        Quetzaltenango
|site=        Maun
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|Sector=      Appropriate Technology
|region=North-West
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|program=Education
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|assignment01=      Teacher
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}}
 
}}
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[[Image:Erik_making_his_first_adobe_stove.JPG]]
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== Training ==
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Our group departed from Miami in November 1987.  We spent three months at a training center in the aldea of Jocotenango, just outside of Antigua.  I lived with a very poor family during training.  They cooked on an open fire and everything tasted like smoke, even the watery oatmeal.  We ate beans and tortillas almost all the time.  My stomach was unsettled during my whole two years of service, and I drank a bottle of Pepto-Bismol about every week (not really).  I survived by trading my smoky tasting food for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.  Out of about 50 trainees, about 45 of us were sworn in as volunteers in February 1988 in Guatemala City.
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----
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[[Image:1489.jpg]]
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== Volunteer Service ==
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My project was called '''appropriate technology'''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appropriate_technology].  Mostly I taught people how to build stoves.  The indigenous population was used to cooking on the floor.  Basically they would put a pot on top of three rocks and use wood they gathered from the nearby forests.  This caused their one room adobe houses to fill up with smoke.  The smoke caused eye and respiratory problems, particularly for the children.  This method also used a lot of wood, which exacerbated the terrible deforestation occurring in the highlands.  The stoves that we built, if used correctly, used less wood.  Even if they were not used correctly, they usually got the smoke out of the house. I think we built close to two hundred stoves while I was there.  And I know that they continued to build them after I left.
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[[Image:Rev2lang39-r3-e044.jpg]]
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I also taught people how to build latrines, mostly pit latrines.  However, we built a few composting toilets.  I did not have an official counterpart, but worked very closely with a fantastic individual named [[Julio Marin Quijibish]].  He spoke Spanish and the Quiche language.  He was paid by a religious based health clinic called [[Clinica Cristiana]].  It was a project funded by a church in Falls Church, Virginia.  They did exceptional work.  They had North American doctors who spoke Spanish and Quiche fluently.  I spoke only a few words of Quiche.  We also built a few solar ovens and a few fero-cement storage tanks.  However the stoves were the most successful.  I had a little motorcycle and traveled to many rural areas outside of Quetzaltenago to build stones. 
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There were three different types of stoves being built in the time period I was in Guatemala: adobe, ceramic, and brick.  My counterpart Julio had been building adobe stoves before I taught him how to build brick stoves.  The adobe stoves were harder to build and took longer.  The brick stoves were more durable and efficient.  There was a ceramic stove maker in a neighboring province, Eleuterio Ramos Guinil,who had been trained by a previous volunteer.  He lived in Cajola[http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=cajola+guatemala&sll=14.922227,-91.612587&sspn=0.081277,0.11673&ie=UTF8&ll=14.955399,-91.604004&spn=1.300212,1.867676&z=9&iwloc=addr] and worked mostly on the coast.  My counterpart and I built mostly brick stoves in and around Quetzaltenango.  We had two helpers: Santiago & Thomas.  My counterpart, Julio, invented a somewhat [[portable brick stove built on top of a cement slab]].  He was very smart.  He and I also wrote a manual on how to create cement slabs and make pit latrines.  Some other volunteers, Barry & June Moline, came to my site and built a large bread oven for Julio, and he started a small bakery out of his house.
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== Related Links ==
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'''''See this''''' [http://wlerik.wordpress.com/2007/02/27/untitled/ 2 minute video I made] for a global warming video contest[http://truths.treehugger.com/] about my Peace Corps experience.
  
Our group of 13 volunteers arrived in Gabarone on July 7, 1981 and were housed at the University of Botswana for a few days before starting our 9 week training at an old Brigades site on the outskirts of Serowe, a large traditional village in the central part of the country. Karl Luntta was one of our great trainers. Our country Directors were Norman and Elsa Rush. They were very supportive and great leaders. Norman is now an award-winning author. We learned the language and culture with intensive classes as well as excursions to experience a wedding, agricultural fair, and other local sites. Our training also included a week homestay with a family in Serowe. That was a great and eye-opening experience. Dan Morrow was my roomie on this village live-in. At the end of our training we learned of our assignments. <br>
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More information about my [http://picasaweb.google.com/wlErik/GuatemalaBW B&W photographs from Guatemala] and Guatemalan paintings from my friend, Harry Danvers, who lives and operates a language school [http://wlerik.blogspot.com/]in Quetzaltenango, can be found at: http://www.guatemalan-art.com/
  
I was lucky enough to get posted at Maun Secondary School in the far north of the country. Maun borders the Okavango Delta, and is the jumping off spot for all the amazing wildlife safaris in that part of the country.
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== Bio/Contact Information ==
I replaced another volunteer, June Woods, who had started a great little school newspaper called the Ditswa Ganong (from the saying "Ditswa Ganong gade gae sanye" - "Words of the mouth cannot be stopped"). I overlapped with June for a semester to learn the ropes with the newspaper and the Journalism Club. Then I was on my own with 5 classes of 40 students each, 5 times a week, plus study hour duties. The students were very respectful and thirsy for knowledge. They all stood up when I entered the classroom and always called me Sir. It was a lot of work, but I felt completely fulfilled giving my time to such eager students.<br>
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B.A. Political Science 1987 (University of Connecticut),
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J.D. 1993 (Dickinson School of Law, Pennsylvania State University)
  
Our school site had been built as a missionary school in a joint effort by the United Methodist Church of America and United Church of Christ of Southern Africa, but was slowly being taken over by the government in the latter days of my stay. We had beautiful homes right on campus along the Thamalekani River where you sometimes could hear hippos grunting at night. We had an amazingly diverse staff from locals to Zimbabweans, South Africans, Dutch, Irish, British, Scandinavians, East Indians, and Americans. Maun village also had quite a few expatriates and we even had get-togethers with food and live music provided by whoever decided to bring an instrument at local houses. The school was around 700 students when I was there with about half living in the two dorms since many of them came from remote villages to our school, which was the only secondary school in the Northern Province then. (When I returned for a visit in 2003, it was about double that size with many new buildings.) We had a lot of fun in the evenings inviting various staff members to our house for cards or pot luck. My roommates in the big house formerly occupied by the Schaad family were Duane Stewart, a Brit history teacher, and Larry Kies, a Methodist missionary from my home state of Iowa, who was the new school garden manager and agricultural studies teacher. The school farm also had cattle and pigs that provided a fresh supply of meat for the school cafeteria and staff kitchens. Larry and his family are currently missionaries at African University in Zimbabwe. Our house had an amazing garden that had been planted by the Schaads,American missionaries who had come to Botswana from Zaire where they had served for many years until civil unrest forced them out. Mr. Schaad not only planted our diverse house orchard, but also brought plants from all over the world to start the hugely successful school garden that provided fresh fruits and vegetables to the school. Many local village gardens and orchards were started from Mr. Schaad's efforts. His daughter, Carol Schaad, was a home economics teacher MSS while I was there and now is employed at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, along with her husband Robin, a volunteer who served in Lesotho. <br>
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Erik's Facebook Page[http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1117819700]<br>
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Erik's Twitter ID[https://twitter.com/wlerik]
  
There are so many positive memories I have of my years in Africa: camping out with students, a long ride (12 hours)in the back of a lorry with my Shakespeare Form 6 students to Gabarone to see MacBeth, "Stone Soup" pot lucks with all our friends (Christensen's, Langendijks, and all), dusty walks into town to "shop" for bread from the Greeks, stop at the butchery, and maybe have a ginger beer at a local shop, prepping for the Cambridge Overseas Exams, travelling to many wonderful sites in Southern Africa on school holidays, soccer matches, pouring rain (PULA!), and dreadfully long droughts . . . but the best memories are of the earnest and sweet faces of the students that believed I had something to help them on their determined quest at a better life. It wasn't just the toughest job I'll ever love; it was the time of my life I will never forget or regret.
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[[category:Volunteers]]
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[[category:Guatemala_Volunteers]]
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[[category:Guatemala_Volunteers_1988]]
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[[category:Guatemala_Volunteers_1988_Quetzaltenango]]
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[[category:Quetzaltenango]]
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[[category:1988]]
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[[category:Quetzaltenango_1988]]

Revision as of 02:46, 23 December 2008


Template:Quickbar File:Erik making his first adobe stove.JPG


Training

Our group departed from Miami in November 1987. We spent three months at a training center in the aldea of Jocotenango, just outside of Antigua. I lived with a very poor family during training. They cooked on an open fire and everything tasted like smoke, even the watery oatmeal. We ate beans and tortillas almost all the time. My stomach was unsettled during my whole two years of service, and I drank a bottle of Pepto-Bismol about every week (not really). I survived by trading my smoky tasting food for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Out of about 50 trainees, about 45 of us were sworn in as volunteers in February 1988 in Guatemala City.


File:1489.jpg

Volunteer Service

My project was called appropriate technology[1]. Mostly I taught people how to build stoves. The indigenous population was used to cooking on the floor. Basically they would put a pot on top of three rocks and use wood they gathered from the nearby forests. This caused their one room adobe houses to fill up with smoke. The smoke caused eye and respiratory problems, particularly for the children. This method also used a lot of wood, which exacerbated the terrible deforestation occurring in the highlands. The stoves that we built, if used correctly, used less wood. Even if they were not used correctly, they usually got the smoke out of the house. I think we built close to two hundred stoves while I was there. And I know that they continued to build them after I left.

File:Rev2lang39-r3-e044.jpg

I also taught people how to build latrines, mostly pit latrines. However, we built a few composting toilets. I did not have an official counterpart, but worked very closely with a fantastic individual named Julio Marin Quijibish. He spoke Spanish and the Quiche language. He was paid by a religious based health clinic called Clinica Cristiana. It was a project funded by a church in Falls Church, Virginia. They did exceptional work. They had North American doctors who spoke Spanish and Quiche fluently. I spoke only a few words of Quiche. We also built a few solar ovens and a few fero-cement storage tanks. However the stoves were the most successful. I had a little motorcycle and traveled to many rural areas outside of Quetzaltenago to build stones.

There were three different types of stoves being built in the time period I was in Guatemala: adobe, ceramic, and brick. My counterpart Julio had been building adobe stoves before I taught him how to build brick stoves. The adobe stoves were harder to build and took longer. The brick stoves were more durable and efficient. There was a ceramic stove maker in a neighboring province, Eleuterio Ramos Guinil,who had been trained by a previous volunteer. He lived in Cajola[2] and worked mostly on the coast. My counterpart and I built mostly brick stoves in and around Quetzaltenango. We had two helpers: Santiago & Thomas. My counterpart, Julio, invented a somewhat portable brick stove built on top of a cement slab. He was very smart. He and I also wrote a manual on how to create cement slabs and make pit latrines. Some other volunteers, Barry & June Moline, came to my site and built a large bread oven for Julio, and he started a small bakery out of his house.

Related Links

See this 2 minute video I made for a global warming video contest[3] about my Peace Corps experience.

More information about my B&W photographs from Guatemala and Guatemalan paintings from my friend, Harry Danvers, who lives and operates a language school [4]in Quetzaltenango, can be found at: http://www.guatemalan-art.com/

Bio/Contact Information

B.A. Political Science 1987 (University of Connecticut), J.D. 1993 (Dickinson School of Law, Pennsylvania State University)

Erik's Facebook Page[5]
Erik's Twitter ID[6]