Difference between pages "List of resources for Nicaragua" and "Daniel L. Manske"

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{{Volunteerinfobox
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|firstname=Daniel
 +
|middlename=L.
 +
|lastname= Manske
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|country=    Botswana
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|yearservicestarted=1981
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|yearserviceended=1983
 +
|groupcode=      July '81
 +
|site=        Maun
 +
|region=North-West
 +
|program=Education
 +
|assignment01=      Teacher
 +
}}
  
Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Nicaragua and to connect you to returned Volunteers and other invitees. Please keep in mind that although we try to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it. If you do not have access to the Internet, visit your local library. Libraries offer free Internet usage and often let you print information to take home.  
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Our group of 13 volunteers arrived in Gabarone on July 7, 1981 and were housed at the University of Botswana for a few days before starting our 9 week training at an old Brigades site on the outskirts of Serowe, a large traditional village in the central part of the country. Karl Luntta was one of our great trainers. Our country Directors were Norman and Elsa Rush. They were very supportive and great leaders. Norman is now an award-winning author. We learned the language and culture with intensive classes as well as excursions to experience a wedding, agricultural fair, and other local sites. Our training also included a week homestay with a family in Serowe. That was a great and eye-opening experience. Dan Morrow was my roomie on this village live-in. At the end of our training we learned of our assignments. <br>
  
A note of caution: As you surf the Internet, be aware that you may find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to express opinions about the Peace Corps based on their own experiences, including comments by those who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. These opinions are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S.  government, and we hope you will keep in mind that no two people experience their service in the same way.  
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I was lucky enough to get posted at Maun Secondary School in the far north of the country. Maun borders the Okavango Delta, and is the jumping off spot for all the amazing wildlife safaris in that part of the country.
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I replaced another volunteer, June Woods, who had started a great little school newspaper called the Ditswa Ganong (from the saying "Ditswa Ganong gade gae sanye" - "Words of the mouth cannot be stopped"). I overlapped with June for a semester to learn the ropes with the newspaper and the Journalism Club. Then I was on my own with 5 classes of 40 students each, 5 times a week, plus study hour duties. The students were very respectful and thirsy for knowledge. They all stood up when I entered the classroom and always called me Sir. It was a lot of work, but I felt completely fulfilled giving my time to such eager students.<br>
  
===General Information About Nicaragua ===
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Our school site had been built as a missionary school in a joint effort by the United Methodist Church of America and United Church of Christ of Southern Africa, but was slowly being taken over by the government in the latter days of my stay. We had beautiful homes right on campus along the Thamalekani River where you sometimes could hear hippos grunting at night. We had an amazingly diverse staff from locals to Zimbabweans, South Africans, Dutch, Irish, British, Scandinavians, East Indians, and Americans. Maun village also had quite a few expatriates and we even had get-togethers with food and live music provided by whoever decided to bring an instrument at local houses. The school was around 700 students when I was there with about half living in the two dorms since many of them came from remote villages to our school, which was the only secondary school in the Northern Province then. (When I returned for a visit in 2003, it was about double that size with many new buildings.) We had a lot of fun in the evenings inviting various staff members to our house for cards or pot luck. My roommates in the big house formerly occupied by the Schaad family were Duane Stewart, a Brit history teacher, and Larry Kies, a Methodist missionary from my home state of Iowa, who was the new school garden manager and agricultural studies teacher. The school farm also had cattle and pigs that provided a fresh supply of meat for the school cafeteria and staff kitchens. Larry and his family are currently missionaries at African University in Zimbabwe. Our house had an amazing garden that had been planted by the Schaads,American missionaries who had come to Botswana from Zaire where they had served for many years until civil unrest forced them out. Mr. Schaad not only planted our diverse house orchard, but also brought plants from all over the world to start the hugely successful school garden that provided fresh fruits and vegetables to the school. Many local village gardens and orchards were started from Mr. Schaad's efforts. His daughter, Carol Schaad, was a home economics teacher MSS while I was there and now is employed at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, along with her husband Robin, a volunteer who served in Lesotho. <br>
  
http://lanic.utexas.edu/la/ca/nicaragua/ <br>
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There are so many positive memories I have of my years in Africa: camping out with students, a long ride (12 hours)in the back of a lorry with my Shakespeare Form 6 students to Gabarone to see MacBeth, "Stone Soup" pot lucks with all our friends (Christensen's, Langendijks, and all), dusty walks into town to "shop" for bread from the Greeks, stop at the butchery, and maybe have a ginger beer at a local shop, prepping for the Cambridge Overseas Exams, travelling to many wonderful sites in Southern Africa on school holidays, soccer matches, pouring rain (PULA!), and dreadfully long droughts . . . but the best memories are of the earnest and sweet faces of the students that believed I had something to help them on their determined quest at a better life. It wasn't just the toughest job I'll ever love; it was the time of my life I will never forget or regret.
The Latin American Information Network Center (LANIC) from the University of Texas is a very comprehensive resource on all of Latin America. It also organizes by country links to a variety of websites on multiple topics (history, culture, government, news, etc.).
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http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations  <br>
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Visit this site for general travel advice about almost any country in the world.
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http://www.state.gov  <br>
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The U.S. State Department’s website issues background notes periodically about countries around the world. Find Nicaragua and learn more about its social and political history.
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http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm  <br>
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This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information, and each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political background.
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http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/infonation/info.asp  <br>
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This United Nations site allows you to search for statistical information for member states of the U.N.
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http://www.worldinformation.com  <br>
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This site provides an additional source of current and historical information about 228 countries.
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===Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees ===
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http://www.amigosdenicaragua.org  <br>
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“Friends of Nicaragua” is the official website for the returned Peace Corps Volunteers from Nicaragua. It contains general information on the country and serves as an organizational focal point for former Volunteers, including an email listserv.
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http://www.rpcv.org  <br>
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The National Peace Corps Association is made up of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local volunteer activities. Or go straight to Amigos de Nicaragua (www.amigosdenicaragua.org, see above).
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http://www.peacecorpsonline.org  <br>
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This is an independent new site serving returned Peace Corps Volunteers. There are relevant links to information and chat groups for prospective Volunteers.
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http://www.rpcvwebring.org  <br>
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This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.
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http://www.peacecorpswriters.org  <br>
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This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers. It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts of their Peace Corps service.
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===Online Articles/Current News Sites About Nicaragua ===
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http://www.GoToNicaragua.com/  <br>
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Nicaragua travel, news, and user forum, created by two Nicaragua RPCVs.
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http://www.ibw.com.ni  <br>
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Comprehensive list of links to local and international sites about Nicaragua.
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http://www.nicaragua.com  <br>
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Links to English language new stories about Nicaragua and more.
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http://www.laprensa.com.ni/  <br>
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Nicaragua’s largest daily newspaper (in Spanish).
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http://www.world-newspapers.com/nicaragua.html  <br>
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Links to English language news stories about Nicaragua.
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===International Development Sites ===
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http://managua.usembassy.gov/wwwhemba.html  <br>
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The site of the U.S. Embassy in Nicaragua. 
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http://www.usaid.org.ni/  <br>
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The U.S. Agency for International Development’s official Nicaragua website. This will provide valuable information on development trends in country.
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http://www.worldbank.org  <br>
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The World Bank Group’s mission is to fight poverty and improve the living standards of people in the developing world. It is a development bank that provides loans, policy advice, technical assistance, and knowledge-sharing services to developing countries to reduce poverty. This site contains a lot of information and resources regarding Nicaragua and development.
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http://www.oas.org  <br>
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The Organization of the American States’ website contains information about development priorities, democracy, and other issues that are key in the Americas.
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===Recommended Books ===
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# Berman, Joshua, and Randall Wood (both Returned Nicaragua PCVs). Moon Handbooks Nicaragua. Emeryville, Calif.: Avalon Travel Publishing, 2002, 2005. http://gotonicaragua.com/content/view/14/30/
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# Berman, Joshua, and Randall Wood. Living Abroad In Nicaragua (by returned Nicaragua Volunteers). Emeryville, Calif.: Avalon Travel Publishing, 2007. http://gotonicaragua.com/content/view/15/31/
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# De La Selva, Salomon. Tropical Town and Other Poems. Houston, Texas: Arte Público Press, 1999.
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# Glenn, Garvin. Everybody Had His Own Gringo: The CIA and the Contras. United Kingdom: Brasseys, 1992.
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# Gould, Jeffrey L. To Die in This Way: Nicaraguan Indians and the Myth of the Mestizaje 1880-1965.  Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998.
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# Kinzer, Stephen. Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua. New York: Anchor Books, 1992.
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# MacAulay, Neill. The Sandino Affair. Wacahoota Press, 1998. 
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# Merrill, Tim L. Nicaragua: A Country Study.Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1999.
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# Miranda, Roger. The Civil War in Nicaragua: Inside the Sandinistas. Somerset, N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 1993.
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# Norsworthy, Kent. Nicaragua: A Country Guide.Silver City, N.M.: Interhemispheric Resource Center, 1990.
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# Pezzullo, Lawrence. At the Fall of Somoza. Pittsburgh, Pa.: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1994.
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# Plunkett, Hazel. Nicaragua: A Guide to the People, Politics and Culture. Northampton, Mass.: Interlink Publishing, 1999.
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===Books About the Peace Corps ===
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# Banerjee, Dillon. So You Want to Join the Peace Corps: What to Know Before You Go. Berkeley, Calif.:Ten Speed Press, 2000 (paperback).
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# Herrera, Susana. Mango Elephants in the Sun: How Life in an African Village Let Me Be in My Skin.  Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1999.
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# Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York: Harper Perennial, 2001.
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# Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need Is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960s. Cambridge:Harvard University Press, 2000 (paperback).
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# Lucas, C. Payne, and Kevin Lowther. Keeping Kennedy’s Promise: The Peace Corps’ Moment of Truth (2nd ed.). Peace Corps Online, 2002.
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# Redmon, Coates. Come as You Are: The Peace Corps Story. Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt, 1986.
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# Thomsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace CorpsChronicle. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1969, 1997 (paperback).
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# Tidwell, Mike. The Ponds of Kalambayi: An African Sojourn. Guilford, Conn.: The Lyons Press, 1990, 1996 (paperback).
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[[Category:Nicaragua]]
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Revision as of 21:17, 19 August 2009



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Our group of 13 volunteers arrived in Gabarone on July 7, 1981 and were housed at the University of Botswana for a few days before starting our 9 week training at an old Brigades site on the outskirts of Serowe, a large traditional village in the central part of the country. Karl Luntta was one of our great trainers. Our country Directors were Norman and Elsa Rush. They were very supportive and great leaders. Norman is now an award-winning author. We learned the language and culture with intensive classes as well as excursions to experience a wedding, agricultural fair, and other local sites. Our training also included a week homestay with a family in Serowe. That was a great and eye-opening experience. Dan Morrow was my roomie on this village live-in. At the end of our training we learned of our assignments.

I was lucky enough to get posted at Maun Secondary School in the far north of the country. Maun borders the Okavango Delta, and is the jumping off spot for all the amazing wildlife safaris in that part of the country. I replaced another volunteer, June Woods, who had started a great little school newspaper called the Ditswa Ganong (from the saying "Ditswa Ganong gade gae sanye" - "Words of the mouth cannot be stopped"). I overlapped with June for a semester to learn the ropes with the newspaper and the Journalism Club. Then I was on my own with 5 classes of 40 students each, 5 times a week, plus study hour duties. The students were very respectful and thirsy for knowledge. They all stood up when I entered the classroom and always called me Sir. It was a lot of work, but I felt completely fulfilled giving my time to such eager students.

Our school site had been built as a missionary school in a joint effort by the United Methodist Church of America and United Church of Christ of Southern Africa, but was slowly being taken over by the government in the latter days of my stay. We had beautiful homes right on campus along the Thamalekani River where you sometimes could hear hippos grunting at night. We had an amazingly diverse staff from locals to Zimbabweans, South Africans, Dutch, Irish, British, Scandinavians, East Indians, and Americans. Maun village also had quite a few expatriates and we even had get-togethers with food and live music provided by whoever decided to bring an instrument at local houses. The school was around 700 students when I was there with about half living in the two dorms since many of them came from remote villages to our school, which was the only secondary school in the Northern Province then. (When I returned for a visit in 2003, it was about double that size with many new buildings.) We had a lot of fun in the evenings inviting various staff members to our house for cards or pot luck. My roommates in the big house formerly occupied by the Schaad family were Duane Stewart, a Brit history teacher, and Larry Kies, a Methodist missionary from my home state of Iowa, who was the new school garden manager and agricultural studies teacher. The school farm also had cattle and pigs that provided a fresh supply of meat for the school cafeteria and staff kitchens. Larry and his family are currently missionaries at African University in Zimbabwe. Our house had an amazing garden that had been planted by the Schaads,American missionaries who had come to Botswana from Zaire where they had served for many years until civil unrest forced them out. Mr. Schaad not only planted our diverse house orchard, but also brought plants from all over the world to start the hugely successful school garden that provided fresh fruits and vegetables to the school. Many local village gardens and orchards were started from Mr. Schaad's efforts. His daughter, Carol Schaad, was a home economics teacher MSS while I was there and now is employed at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, along with her husband Robin, a volunteer who served in Lesotho.

There are so many positive memories I have of my years in Africa: camping out with students, a long ride (12 hours)in the back of a lorry with my Shakespeare Form 6 students to Gabarone to see MacBeth, "Stone Soup" pot lucks with all our friends (Christensen's, Langendijks, and all), dusty walks into town to "shop" for bread from the Greeks, stop at the butchery, and maybe have a ginger beer at a local shop, prepping for the Cambridge Overseas Exams, travelling to many wonderful sites in Southern Africa on school holidays, soccer matches, pouring rain (PULA!), and dreadfully long droughts . . . but the best memories are of the earnest and sweet faces of the students that believed I had something to help them on their determined quest at a better life. It wasn't just the toughest job I'll ever love; it was the time of my life I will never forget or regret.