Difference between pages "Packing list for Kiribati" and "History of the Peace Corps in Tonga"

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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Kiribati]] and is based on their experiences. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage as far as Peace Corps’ official reimbursement. Air Pacific, which you will take for the last leg of your trip has a 20 kg. (44 lbs.) checked baggage allowance and doesn’t allow large carry-on items. If you are charged extra, Peace Corps/Kiribati will reimburse you, but only up to your 80-pound Peace Corps’ limit.  Remember, you can get almost everything you need in Kiribati.
 
  
===General Clothing ===
 
  
===Men ===
 
  
* Cotton underwear (some people find boxers are cooler in the heat)
 
* One pair of long pants
 
* Three or four dark colored khaki shorts (to or below the knee)
 
* Two or three pairs of exercise shorts (any variety, to the knee)
 
* Four 100-percent cotton, short-sleeved, button-down dress shirts
 
* Three or four T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
 
* Swim trunks
 
  
===Women ===
+
The Peace Corps has a rich and extensive history in the Kingdom of Tonga. Volunteers first arrived in October 1967 at the invitation of King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV. The initial group consisted of only 39 trainees; by the end of that first year, there were more than 400 Volunteers and trainees in Tonga.  Since then, more than 1,000 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in Tonga, primarily as teachers. However, Peace Corps programming in Tonga has also included work in fisheries, agriculture, physical therapy, architecture, health, marine biology, water resources, cooperatives, business, construction, environment, and youth.
  
* Cotton underwear (some female Volunteers find cotton boxers cooler) and bras, two or three sports bras for exercise or swimming
+
Today, approximately 50 Volunteers are serving in Tonga.  Current Volunteers are working in the community micro-enterprise development and community education projects.  Both incorporate elements from previous programs and future Volunteers will build upon the foundations established by several generations of Volunteers in Tonga.
* Three or four long, light cotton skirts or dresses (something you can sit cross-legged in on the floor without showing anything above your knee)
+
* One or two slips to wear under skirts
+
* Three or four light cotton blouses or shirts (sleeveless is okay, tight is not! (Shoulders should be covered and no spaghetti straps!)
+
* Two or three T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
+
* Three or four pairs of loose, long, lightweight below-the-knee/mid-calf length shorts (cropped pants/pedal pushers that are loose)
+
* Swimwear (typically long shorts, a T-shirt, and sports bra)
+
* Clothes for going out on South Tarawa
+
  
Optional: loose, long pants for evening wear in your house or for vacations; swimsuit (mainly for international vacations).  
+
The community education project focuses on both formal and nonformal education at the village level. Most Volunteers serve in the communities with the greatest needs in Tonga, including remote outer islands and the smaller villages on the main island of Tongatapu. Volunteers divide their time roughly equally between their formal work as enrichment teachers in the classroom and their nonformal education activities at the community level. This approach helps establish schools as centers for community education and development throughout the kingdom.  
  
(You will get several locally made shirts that are lightweight and more comfortable in the heat so do not worry too much about T-shirts.)  
+
In the schools, most education Volunteers serve as enrichment teachers for English as a second language (ESL) at the elementary and secondary school levels. Volunteers work closely with a Tongan counterpart teacher to develop, enhance, and enrich the English language instruction at all grade levels in their schools. Volunteers also help to develop resources, including library and computer resources, and increase the links between schools and communities. Many Volunteers are involved in creating and implementing community classes in the information technology (IT) and English fields. They are involved in a range of extracurricular activities including arts, music, physical education, sports leagues, and student clubs.
  
Note to women: With clothes, the issue isn’t necessarily seeing skin, it is seeing the shape of the body. In particular, it is not acceptable for people to be able to determine the shape of the legs and crotch area. That is why you have to wear something under any skirt that might be even remotely transparent. Shop accordingly.  
+
Outside the classroom, education Volunteers work closely with a wide range of community organizations including youth groups, women’s groups, church groups, and others.  Using nonformal education techniques appropriate for adult audiences, Volunteers focus especially on environmental and health education. Volunteers promote appropriate solid waste management, recycling, integrated coastal management, and ecotourism development. The most important health education issues in Tonga are related to preventing noncommunicable diseases. To that end, Volunteers have created exercise programs and developed nutrition workshops and activities with community groups and through the formal school setting.  
  
===Shoes===
+
The community micro-enterprise development project is designed to meet the pressing needs of income-generating employment and capacity building for economic growth throughout the kingdom. Micro-enterprise Volunteers advise and motivate potential business entrepreneurs and provide training for youth, women, and communities throughout the kingdom. They work through programs provided by the Tonga Development Bank; the Ministry of Labor, Commerce, Industries and Tourism; and the Tonga National Youth Congress. Volunteers work with local counterparts and clients to develop appropriate training programs and provide effective advice on financial and managerial topics, marketing techniques, skills development, and motivation to those who are interested in starting a business or participating in income-generating activities.
  
* One pair or two pairs of sturdy sports sandals (e.g., Tevas); keep in mind that you’ll be putting shoes on and taking them off constantly and many Volunteers prefer flip-flops or slip-on sandals)
+
Micro-enterprise Volunteers work in a variety of business fields, including solid-waste management, recycling, sports, ecotourism, and farm and small-scale agribusiness management. Many of these business activities complement community education project activities.  
* One pair of dive booties/reef shoes or other surf/ swimming shoes
+
* Two pair of high-quality flip-flops (cheap ones can be purchased in Tarawa)
+
* Exercise shoes, if you plan to exercise (do not forget your socks if you bring shoes); turf cleats are great for soccer
+
* Socks (to protect your cut-up and bandaged feet while they heal during the natural adjustment to walking on a coral atoll.)
+
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
+
All Volunteers regardless of sector work at their sites and in their villages on disaster preparedness, mitigation, and assessment activities. They work with their schools, town officers, and town councils to ensure that their communities are prepared for any disasters that might occur.
  
* Hair conditioner, especially if you like a certain brand
+
==Assignment History==
* Good toothbrushes (you can get toothpaste here)
+
* Deodorant
+
* Shaving cream, a good razor, and extra blades Optional: Nice-smelling lotions, nail clippers, makeup (although this is rarely worn in Kiribati, you might want it for vacations), a month’s supply of tampons, Q-Tips, contact lens solution.
+
  
 +
{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
 +
|-
 +
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="9" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
 +
| [[Ag Economics]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Education]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Extension]]
 +
| [[1969]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Animal Husband]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Animal Husband Lg]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Apiculture]]
 +
| [[1971]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Crop Extension]]
 +
| [[1967]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Farm Mechanics]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="7" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
 +
| [[Accounting]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Archictecture]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Advising]]
 +
| [[1970]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Development]]
 +
| [[1970]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Computer Science]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Cooperatives]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[NGO Advising]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
| [[2006]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
 +
| [[Crisis Corps]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="16" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
 +
| [[Art Education]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher]]
 +
| [[1970]]
 +
| [[2002]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
| [[2004]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Gen. Construction]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[2003]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Economics]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Industrial Arts]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Science Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Univ. English Teaching]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[2002]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
 +
| [[Comm Forestry Ext]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Environmental Ed.]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Forestry]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[2003]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="6" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
 +
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
 +
| [[1972]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Degreed]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Extension]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Econ/Ext.]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Physical Therapy]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Master's International]]'''
 +
| [[Masters Internationalist]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
 +
| [[Flexible App]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Unique Skill]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
 +
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="5" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
 +
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2004]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Mechanics]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Road Const/Engin.]]
 +
| [[1973]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Youth Development]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
|}
  
Note: Almost all standard personal hygiene items are available in South Tarawa (often imported from Australia), so you do not need to bring most items unless you prefer particular brands.
 
  
===Kitchen ===
+
[[Category:Tonga]]
 
+
* One decent non-stick frying pan (you can get a cheap one here)
+
* One good-quality fish fillet knife (you can get a cheap one here)
+
* One good-quality all-purpose kitchen knife (you can get a cheap one here)
+
* Plastic spatula
+
* Thin cutting board
+
* Good can opener
+
* Measuring cups and spoons
+
* Spices
+
 
+
Note: The above kitchen utensils can all be purchased in Tarawa. Though there are some spices, if you are a creative cook you may want to bring your own.
+
 
+
===Educational Materials===
+
 
+
The following are particularly important for education Volunteers, but will prove useful no matter your sector or project.
+
 
+
* A good English dictionary
+
* Plenty of stickers...then get a few MORE stickers
+
* Markers (colored, scented, sparkling, etc.)
+
* Crayons
+
* Pencils
+
* Art supplies (if you like to be creative—and that helps here)
+
* A bottle of glue
+
* Nice pens
+
 
+
===Miscellaneous===
+
 
+
* Gifts for your host family
+
* Two sturdy bottles that can hold recently boiled water (e.g., Nalgene)
+
* Duct tape
+
* Therm-a-Rest or sleeping mat (some people prefer not to use them because they are warm; others find them very comfortable)
+
* Deck of cards
+
* Pictures of friends and family (laminated or copies are best)
+
* Leatherman or other utility tool
+
* Two water-resistant flashlights (with extra bulbs and easily accessible batteries)
+
* A head lamp (for keeping hands free if riding a bike or going to the toilet at night)
+
* Snorkel, mask, and fins (can be purchased here); note that there are currently no SCUBA facilities in the country, so there’s no need to bring any SCUBA gear
+
* Walkman/Discman with small speakers or a small, self-contained unit, or iPod with battery charger/battery pack
+
* Plastic bags (e.g., ziploc bags) and/or containers of different sizes
+
* A good day pack
+
* Two pairs of UV-protection sunglasses
+
* Two cotton pillowcases and a flat sheet
+
* Waterproof watch with an extra battery and band
+
* Travel alarm clock
+
* Two lightweight towels
+
* Camera and film
+
* Hats, caps, visors (several)
+
* Radio, preferably hand cranking 
+
* A few small or medium-size combination locks
+
* Index cards and file folders (good for making flash cards)
+
* U.S. postage stamps to send mail back with travelers
+
* Batteries (see below)
+
 
+
Optional: Rechargeable batteries and solar battery charger, five-gallon collapsible water jug, silica gel packets (to help prevent moisture in electronics), games, books, videos, hammock, camping chair, shortwave radio and antenna extension, bicycle tire patches (available in Tarawa), musical instruments, songbooks, inflatable globe or maps.
+
 
+
Note about batteries: The batteries in Kiribati are not of good quality, but are not as harmful to the environment as U.S.  batteries. You will have to take whatever batteries you bring into the country with you when you leave, as there is no environmentally friendly way to dispose of batteries in Kiribati.  It is recommended that you run all your battery-powered equipment using the same size of batteries. Some Volunteers recommend lithium batteries for their long life.
+
 
+
A note about surfing in Kiribati: Surf is very inconsistent here and waves do not have good shape. It can also be dangerous because it breaks on the coral reef. Please keep these points in mind if you are considering bringing a surfboard.
+
 
+
Peace Corps will provide you with a mosquito net, life vest, water filter, bike helmet, and medical kit. With your settling-in allowance, you will purchase a gas stove, tin oven, buckets, basins, plates, and a bicycle.
+
 
+
 
+
[[Category:Kiribati]]
+

Revision as of 02:44, 13 March 2009

History of the Peace Corps
vvZFOeV9RWw|250}}
Since 1960, when then Senator John F. Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries, more than 182,000 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in 138 countries all over the globe.

See also:



The Peace Corps has a rich and extensive history in the Kingdom of Tonga. Volunteers first arrived in October 1967 at the invitation of King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV. The initial group consisted of only 39 trainees; by the end of that first year, there were more than 400 Volunteers and trainees in Tonga. Since then, more than 1,000 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in Tonga, primarily as teachers. However, Peace Corps programming in Tonga has also included work in fisheries, agriculture, physical therapy, architecture, health, marine biology, water resources, cooperatives, business, construction, environment, and youth.

Today, approximately 50 Volunteers are serving in Tonga. Current Volunteers are working in the community micro-enterprise development and community education projects. Both incorporate elements from previous programs and future Volunteers will build upon the foundations established by several generations of Volunteers in Tonga.

The community education project focuses on both formal and nonformal education at the village level. Most Volunteers serve in the communities with the greatest needs in Tonga, including remote outer islands and the smaller villages on the main island of Tongatapu. Volunteers divide their time roughly equally between their formal work as enrichment teachers in the classroom and their nonformal education activities at the community level. This approach helps establish schools as centers for community education and development throughout the kingdom.

In the schools, most education Volunteers serve as enrichment teachers for English as a second language (ESL) at the elementary and secondary school levels. Volunteers work closely with a Tongan counterpart teacher to develop, enhance, and enrich the English language instruction at all grade levels in their schools. Volunteers also help to develop resources, including library and computer resources, and increase the links between schools and communities. Many Volunteers are involved in creating and implementing community classes in the information technology (IT) and English fields. They are involved in a range of extracurricular activities including arts, music, physical education, sports leagues, and student clubs.

Outside the classroom, education Volunteers work closely with a wide range of community organizations including youth groups, women’s groups, church groups, and others. Using nonformal education techniques appropriate for adult audiences, Volunteers focus especially on environmental and health education. Volunteers promote appropriate solid waste management, recycling, integrated coastal management, and ecotourism development. The most important health education issues in Tonga are related to preventing noncommunicable diseases. To that end, Volunteers have created exercise programs and developed nutrition workshops and activities with community groups and through the formal school setting.

The community micro-enterprise development project is designed to meet the pressing needs of income-generating employment and capacity building for economic growth throughout the kingdom. Micro-enterprise Volunteers advise and motivate potential business entrepreneurs and provide training for youth, women, and communities throughout the kingdom. They work through programs provided by the Tonga Development Bank; the Ministry of Labor, Commerce, Industries and Tourism; and the Tonga National Youth Congress. Volunteers work with local counterparts and clients to develop appropriate training programs and provide effective advice on financial and managerial topics, marketing techniques, skills development, and motivation to those who are interested in starting a business or participating in income-generating activities.

Micro-enterprise Volunteers work in a variety of business fields, including solid-waste management, recycling, sports, ecotourism, and farm and small-scale agribusiness management. Many of these business activities complement community education project activities.

All Volunteers regardless of sector work at their sites and in their villages on disaster preparedness, mitigation, and assessment activities. They work with their schools, town officers, and town councils to ensure that their communities are prepared for any disasters that might occur.

Assignment History

Sector Assignment Beg. Yr End. Yr
Agriculture Ag Economics 1989 1989
Ag Education 1981 1986
Ag Extension 1969 2000
Animal Husband 1981 1981
Animal Husband Lg 1980 1990
Apiculture 1971 1976
Crop Extension 1967 1992
Farm Mechanics 1982 1984
Fisheries Marine 1982 1991
Business Accounting 1982 1994
Archictecture 1981 1982
Business Advising 1970 2007
Business Development 1970 2007
Computer Science 1992 2007
Cooperatives 1981 1990
NGO Advising 1995 2006
Crisis Corps Crisis Corps 1990 1990
Education Art Education 1984 1984
Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl 1980 1984
English Teacher 1970 2002
English Teacher Trainer 1991 2004
Fisheries Fresh 2000 2000
Gen. Construction 1985 2003
Home Economics 1981 1981
Industrial Arts 1979 1996
Phys. Ed/Youth Wk 1994 1998
Prim-Ed/Teach Trn 1980 2007
Science Ed/Gen. 1980 1987
Secondary-Ed Math 1991 2000
Secondary-Ed Sci. 1979 2000
Special Ed/Gen. 1981 1985
Univ. English Teaching 1978 2002
Voc. Trainer 1981 1992
Environment Comm Forestry Ext 1987 1998
Environmental Ed. 1990 2007
Forestry 1986 1992
Protected Areas Management 1992 2003
Health Envir. and Water Resource 1972 1982
Health Degreed 1980 1991
Health Extension 1980 2007
Home Econ/Ext. 1990 1990
Hygiene Ed/Sanitation 1979 1986
Physical Therapy 1985 1987
Master's International Masters Internationalist 1999 1999
Other Flexible App 1980 1992
Unique Skill 1979 1993
UNV United Nations Volunteer 1976 1995
Youth and Community Development Appropriate Tech. 1983 1995
Commun. Serv/Deg. 1979 2004
Mechanics 1983 1983
Road Const/Engin. 1973 1976
Youth Development 1995 2007