Difference between pages "List of resources for Mali" and "Packing list for Kiribati"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
  
Following is a list of websites for additional information about the Peace Corps and Mali and to connect you to returned Volunteers and other invitees. Although we try to make sure all these links are active and current, we cannot guarantee it. If you do not have access to the Internet, visit your local library. Libraries offer free Internet usage and often let you print information to take home.  
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Kiribati]] and is based on their experiences. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage as far as Peace Corps’ official reimbursement. Air Pacific, which you will take for the last leg of your trip has a 20 kg. (44 lbs.) checked baggage allowance and doesn’t allow large carry-on items. If you are charged extra, Peace Corps/Kiribati will reimburse you, but only up to your 80-pound Peace Corps’ limit.  Remember, you can get almost everything you need in Kiribati.  
  
A note of caution: As you surf the Internet, be aware that you may find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to express opinions about the Peace Corps based on their own experiences, including comments by those who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. These opinions are not those of the Peace Corps or the U.S.  government, and we hope you will keep in mind that no two people experience their service in the same way.
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===General Clothing ===
  
===General Information About Mali ===
+
===Men ===
  
http://www.state.gov <br>
+
* Cotton underwear (some people find boxers are cooler in the heat)
The U.S. State Department’s website issues background notes periodically about countries around the world. Find Mali and learn more about its social and political history.
+
* One pair of long pants
 +
* Three or four dark colored khaki shorts (to or below the knee)
 +
* Two or three pairs of exercise shorts (any variety, to the knee)
 +
* Four 100-percent cotton, short-sleeved, button-down dress shirts
 +
* Three or four T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
 +
* Swim trunks
  
http://www.geography.about.com/library/maps/blindex.htm  <br>
+
===Women ===
This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information, and each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political background.
+
  
http://www.worldinformation.com  <br>
+
* Cotton underwear (some female Volunteers find cotton boxers cooler) and bras, two or three sports bras for exercise or swimming
This site provides an additional source of current and historical information about 228 countries.
+
* Three or four long, light cotton skirts or dresses (something you can sit cross-legged in on the floor without showing anything above your knee)
 +
* One or two slips to wear under skirts
 +
* Three or four light cotton blouses or shirts (sleeveless is okay, tight is not! (Shoulders should be covered and no spaghetti straps!)
 +
* Two or three T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
 +
* Three or four pairs of loose, long, lightweight below-the-knee/mid-calf length shorts (cropped pants/pedal pushers that are loose)
 +
* Swimwear (typically long shorts, a T-shirt, and sports bra)
 +
* Clothes for going out on South Tarawa
  
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ml.html  <br>
+
Optional: loose, long pants for evening wear in your house or for vacations; swimsuit (mainly for international vacations).  
CIA factbook pages on Mali.  
+
  
http://w3.usa.org.ml/  <br>
+
(You will get several locally made shirts that are lightweight and more comfortable in the heat so do not worry too much about T-shirts.)
Web site of the U.S. Embassy in Bamako, Mali.  
+
  
http://www.usaidmali.org/ <br>
+
Note to women: With clothes, the issue isn’t necessarily seeing skin, it is seeing the shape of the body. In particular, it is not acceptable for people to be able to determine the shape of the legs and crotch area. That is why you have to wear something under any skirt that might be even remotely transparentShop accordingly.  
USAIDs website containing information about their various activities in Mali.  
+
  
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/country_profiles/1021454.stm  <br>
+
===Shoes===
BBC News country profile about Mali; contains links to current news concerning Mali.
+
  
http://w3.culture.gov.ml/index.html  <br>
+
* One pair or two pairs of sturdy sports sandals (e.g., Tevas); keep in mind that you’ll be putting shoes on and taking them off constantly and many Volunteers prefer flip-flops or slip-on sandals)
Web site for the Malian Ministry of Culture
+
* One pair of dive booties/reef shoes or other surf/ swimming shoes
 +
* Two pair of high-quality flip-flops (cheap ones can be purchased in Tarawa)
 +
* Exercise shoes, if you plan to exercise (do not forget your socks if you bring shoes); turf cleats are great for soccer
 +
* Socks (to protect your cut-up and bandaged feet while they heal during the natural adjustment to walking on a coral atoll.)
  
===Language Resources ===
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
  
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bambara_language Wikipedia]  <br>
+
* Hair conditioner, especially if you like a certain brand
Overview of the Bambara language and its history on Wikipedia.
+
* Good toothbrushes (you can get toothpaste here)
 +
* Deodorant
 +
* Shaving cream, a good razor, and extra blades Optional: Nice-smelling lotions, nail clippers, makeup (although this is rarely worn in Kiribati, you might want it for vacations), a month’s supply of tampons, Q-Tips, contact lens solution.  
  
[http://www.livelingua.com/peace-corps-bambara-course.php U.S. Peace Corps Bambara Course]  <br>
 
A survival course in Bambara with an ebook and audio made by the Peace Corps.
 
  
===Connect with Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees ===
+
Note: Almost all standard personal hygiene items are available in South Tarawa (often imported from Australia), so you do not need to bring most items unless you prefer particular brands.
  
http://www.rpcv.org  <br>
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===Kitchen ===
This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, made up of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local Volunteer activities.
+
  
http://www.rpcvwebring.org  <br>
+
* One decent non-stick frying pan (you can get a cheap one here)
This site is known as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Web Ring. Browse the Web ring and see what former Volunteers are saying about their service.
+
* One good-quality fish fillet knife (you can get a cheap one here)
 +
* One good-quality all-purpose kitchen knife (you can get a cheap one here)
 +
* Plastic spatula
 +
* Thin cutting board
 +
* Good can opener
 +
* Measuring cups and spoons
 +
* Spices
  
http://www.peacecorpswriters.org  <br>
+
Note: The above kitchen utensils can all be purchased in Tarawa. Though there are some spices, if you are a creative cook you may want to bring your own.  
This site is hosted by a group of returned Volunteer writers. It is a monthly online publication of essays and Volunteer accounts of their Peace Corps service.  
+
  
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/malipc/  <br>
+
===Educational Materials===
Join to stay in touch with current and former Mali Volunteers and their families
+
  
http://www.friendsofmali.org/  <br>
+
The following are particularly important for education Volunteers, but will prove useful no matter your sector or project.  
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer group dedicated to promoting an understanding of the people and culture of Mali and supporting the Peace Corps’ third goal—to bring the world back home—by encouraging members to share their experiences with their own communities.
+
  
===Online Articles/Current News Sites About Mali ===
+
* A good English dictionary
 +
* Plenty of stickers...then get a few MORE stickers
 +
* Markers (colored, scented, sparkling, etc.)
 +
* Crayons
 +
* Pencils
 +
* Art supplies (if you like to be creative—and that helps here)
 +
* A bottle of glue
 +
* Nice pens
  
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Country_Specific/Mali.html  <br>
+
===Miscellaneous===
University of Pennsylvania page with links to other sites of interest
+
  
http://www.uiowa.edu/~africart/  <br>
+
* Gifts for your host family
A University of Iowa site set up by former Burkina Faso Volunteer Christopher Roy, an expert on Voltaic masks
+
* Two sturdy bottles that can hold recently boiled water (e.g., Nalgene)
 +
* Duct tape
 +
* Therm-a-Rest or sleeping mat (some people prefer not to use them because they are warm; others find them very comfortable)
 +
* Deck of cards
 +
* Pictures of friends and family (laminated or copies are best)
 +
* Leatherman or other utility tool
 +
* Two water-resistant flashlights (with extra bulbs and easily accessible batteries)
 +
* A head lamp (for keeping hands free if riding a bike or going to the toilet at night)
 +
* Snorkel, mask, and fins (can be purchased here); note that there are currently no SCUBA facilities in the country, so there’s no need to bring any SCUBA gear
 +
* Walkman/Discman with small speakers or a small, self-contained unit, or iPod with battery charger/battery pack
 +
* Plastic bags (e.g., ziploc bags) and/or containers of different sizes
 +
* A good day pack
 +
* Two pairs of UV-protection sunglasses
 +
* Two cotton pillowcases and a flat sheet
 +
* Waterproof watch with an extra battery and band
 +
* Travel alarm clock
 +
* Two lightweight towels
 +
* Camera and film
 +
* Hats, caps, visors (several)
 +
* Radio, preferably hand cranking 
 +
* A few small or medium-size combination locks
 +
* Index cards and file folders (good for making flash cards)
 +
* U.S. postage stamps to send mail back with travelers
 +
* Batteries (see below)
  
http://www.allafrica.com  <br>
+
Optional: Rechargeable batteries and solar battery charger, five-gallon collapsible water jug, silica gel packets (to help prevent moisture in electronics), games, books, videos, hammock, camping chair, shortwave radio and antenna extension, bicycle tire patches (available in Tarawa), musical instruments, songbooks, inflatable globe or maps.  
An informative site with links to a variety of resources
+
  
===International Development Sites ===
+
Note about batteries: The batteries in Kiribati are not of good quality, but are not as harmful to the environment as U.S.  batteries. You will have to take whatever batteries you bring into the country with you when you leave, as there is no environmentally friendly way to dispose of batteries in Kiribati.  It is recommended that you run all your battery-powered equipment using the same size of batteries. Some Volunteers recommend lithium batteries for their long life.
  
http://www.unaids.org  <br>
+
A note about surfing in Kiribati: Surf is very inconsistent here and waves do not have good shape. It can also be dangerous because it breaks on the coral reef. Please keep these points in mind if you are considering bringing a surfboard.
Information on the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS
+
  
http://www.unicef.org  <br>
+
Peace Corps will provide you with a mosquito net, life vest, water filter, bike helmet, and medical kit. With your settling-in allowance, you will purchase a gas stove, tin oven, buckets, basins, plates, and a bicycle.  
UNICEF
+
  
http://www.who.int/en/  <br>
 
World Health Organization
 
  
===Recommended Books ===
+
[[Category:Kiribati]]
 
+
# Bingen, R. James, et al. (eds.). Democracy and Development in Mali. Ann Arbor: Michigan State University, 2000.
+
# Chilson, Peter. Riding the Demon: On the Road in West Africa. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999.
+
# Dettwyler, Katherine. Dancing Skeletons: Life and Death in West Africa. Prospect Heights, Ill.: Waveland Press, 1994.
+
# Else, David, et al. Lonely Planet West Africa. Oakland, Calif.: Lonely Planet, 2002.
+
# Eyre, Banning. In Griot Time: An American Guitarist in Mali. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2000.
+
#      Holloway, Kris.  Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali. Long Grove, IL:  Waveland Press, 2006.
+
# Hollyman, Stephenie, and Walter E.A. van Beek. Dogon: Africa’s People of the Cliffs. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2001.
+
# Imperato, Pascal James. Legends, Sorcerers, and Enchanted Lizards: Door Locks of the Bamana of Mali. New York: Holmes and Meier, 2001. 
+
# Lieve, Joris. Mali Blues: Traveling to an African Beat. Translated by Sam Garrett. Oakland, Calif.: Lonely Planet, 1998.
+
# Lucke, Lewis W. Waiting for Rain: Life and Development in Mali, West Africa. Hanover, Mass.: Christopher Publishing House, 1998.  A memoir by a former USAID employee who served in Mali in the early 1980s - he is now head of the USAID mission in Iraq.  This is what Mali was like before email and reliable phones. 
+
# McLean, Virginia. The Western Saharans. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1980.
+
#      Lawder, Donald. Fishing in the Sky: The Education of Namory Keita. NY: Permanent Press, 1997.  A book by a senior Volunteer and poet who chose to remain in Mali after his service had ended.
+
#      Packer, George. The village of waiting.  New York: Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, 2001.  A memoir by a Togo RPCV whose reflections on his relationships with his village and host family are worth reading for any volunteer in Africa.
+
 
+
===Books About the History of the Peace Corps ===
+
 
+
# Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
+
# Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985.
+
# Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.
+
 
+
===Books on the Volunteer Experience ===
+
 
+
# Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
+
# Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
+
# Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003. 
+
# Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
+
# Kennedy, Geraldine ed. From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
+
# Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).
+
 
+
 
+
[[Category:Mali]]
+

Revision as of 22:42, 12 March 2009


Packing List for [[{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]

Packing Lists by Country

These lists has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]] based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]
[[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}}|}}{{#if:{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}|_{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}|}}.svg|50px|none]]

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category:{{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |3}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |4}} {{#explode:Packing list for Kiribati| |5}}]]

This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Kiribati and is based on their experiences. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage as far as Peace Corps’ official reimbursement. Air Pacific, which you will take for the last leg of your trip has a 20 kg. (44 lbs.) checked baggage allowance and doesn’t allow large carry-on items. If you are charged extra, Peace Corps/Kiribati will reimburse you, but only up to your 80-pound Peace Corps’ limit. Remember, you can get almost everything you need in Kiribati.

General Clothing

Men

  • Cotton underwear (some people find boxers are cooler in the heat)
  • One pair of long pants
  • Three or four dark colored khaki shorts (to or below the knee)
  • Two or three pairs of exercise shorts (any variety, to the knee)
  • Four 100-percent cotton, short-sleeved, button-down dress shirts
  • Three or four T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
  • Swim trunks

Women

  • Cotton underwear (some female Volunteers find cotton boxers cooler) and bras, two or three sports bras for exercise or swimming
  • Three or four long, light cotton skirts or dresses (something you can sit cross-legged in on the floor without showing anything above your knee)
  • One or two slips to wear under skirts
  • Three or four light cotton blouses or shirts (sleeveless is okay, tight is not! (Shoulders should be covered and no spaghetti straps!)
  • Two or three T-shirts or tank tops for informal wear
  • Three or four pairs of loose, long, lightweight below-the-knee/mid-calf length shorts (cropped pants/pedal pushers that are loose)
  • Swimwear (typically long shorts, a T-shirt, and sports bra)
  • Clothes for going out on South Tarawa

Optional: loose, long pants for evening wear in your house or for vacations; swimsuit (mainly for international vacations).

(You will get several locally made shirts that are lightweight and more comfortable in the heat so do not worry too much about T-shirts.)

Note to women: With clothes, the issue isn’t necessarily seeing skin, it is seeing the shape of the body. In particular, it is not acceptable for people to be able to determine the shape of the legs and crotch area. That is why you have to wear something under any skirt that might be even remotely transparent. Shop accordingly.

Shoes

  • One pair or two pairs of sturdy sports sandals (e.g., Tevas); keep in mind that you’ll be putting shoes on and taking them off constantly and many Volunteers prefer flip-flops or slip-on sandals)
  • One pair of dive booties/reef shoes or other surf/ swimming shoes
  • Two pair of high-quality flip-flops (cheap ones can be purchased in Tarawa)
  • Exercise shoes, if you plan to exercise (do not forget your socks if you bring shoes); turf cleats are great for soccer
  • Socks (to protect your cut-up and bandaged feet while they heal during the natural adjustment to walking on a coral atoll.)

Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

  • Hair conditioner, especially if you like a certain brand
  • Good toothbrushes (you can get toothpaste here)
  • Deodorant
  • Shaving cream, a good razor, and extra blades Optional: Nice-smelling lotions, nail clippers, makeup (although this is rarely worn in Kiribati, you might want it for vacations), a month’s supply of tampons, Q-Tips, contact lens solution.


Note: Almost all standard personal hygiene items are available in South Tarawa (often imported from Australia), so you do not need to bring most items unless you prefer particular brands.

Kitchen

  • One decent non-stick frying pan (you can get a cheap one here)
  • One good-quality fish fillet knife (you can get a cheap one here)
  • One good-quality all-purpose kitchen knife (you can get a cheap one here)
  • Plastic spatula
  • Thin cutting board
  • Good can opener
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Spices

Note: The above kitchen utensils can all be purchased in Tarawa. Though there are some spices, if you are a creative cook you may want to bring your own.

Educational Materials

The following are particularly important for education Volunteers, but will prove useful no matter your sector or project.

  • A good English dictionary
  • Plenty of stickers...then get a few MORE stickers
  • Markers (colored, scented, sparkling, etc.)
  • Crayons
  • Pencils
  • Art supplies (if you like to be creative—and that helps here)
  • A bottle of glue
  • Nice pens

Miscellaneous

  • Gifts for your host family
  • Two sturdy bottles that can hold recently boiled water (e.g., Nalgene)
  • Duct tape
  • Therm-a-Rest or sleeping mat (some people prefer not to use them because they are warm; others find them very comfortable)
  • Deck of cards
  • Pictures of friends and family (laminated or copies are best)
  • Leatherman or other utility tool
  • Two water-resistant flashlights (with extra bulbs and easily accessible batteries)
  • A head lamp (for keeping hands free if riding a bike or going to the toilet at night)
  • Snorkel, mask, and fins (can be purchased here); note that there are currently no SCUBA facilities in the country, so there’s no need to bring any SCUBA gear
  • Walkman/Discman with small speakers or a small, self-contained unit, or iPod with battery charger/battery pack
  • Plastic bags (e.g., ziploc bags) and/or containers of different sizes
  • A good day pack
  • Two pairs of UV-protection sunglasses
  • Two cotton pillowcases and a flat sheet
  • Waterproof watch with an extra battery and band
  • Travel alarm clock
  • Two lightweight towels
  • Camera and film
  • Hats, caps, visors (several)
  • Radio, preferably hand cranking
  • A few small or medium-size combination locks
  • Index cards and file folders (good for making flash cards)
  • U.S. postage stamps to send mail back with travelers
  • Batteries (see below)

Optional: Rechargeable batteries and solar battery charger, five-gallon collapsible water jug, silica gel packets (to help prevent moisture in electronics), games, books, videos, hammock, camping chair, shortwave radio and antenna extension, bicycle tire patches (available in Tarawa), musical instruments, songbooks, inflatable globe or maps.

Note about batteries: The batteries in Kiribati are not of good quality, but are not as harmful to the environment as U.S. batteries. You will have to take whatever batteries you bring into the country with you when you leave, as there is no environmentally friendly way to dispose of batteries in Kiribati. It is recommended that you run all your battery-powered equipment using the same size of batteries. Some Volunteers recommend lithium batteries for their long life.

A note about surfing in Kiribati: Surf is very inconsistent here and waves do not have good shape. It can also be dangerous because it breaks on the coral reef. Please keep these points in mind if you are considering bringing a surfboard.

Peace Corps will provide you with a mosquito net, life vest, water filter, bike helmet, and medical kit. With your settling-in allowance, you will purchase a gas stove, tin oven, buckets, basins, plates, and a bicycle.