Difference between pages "Peace Corps Wiki" and "Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Botswana"

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{{Diversity and cross-cultural issues by country}}
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<!-- *********************** ABOUT PEACECORPSWIKI *****************
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In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with our host countries, we are making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years.  Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.
  
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Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Botswana, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Botswana.  
<div style="border-bottom:1px solid #adc687; background-color:#d3e5b8; padding:0.2em 0.5em 0.2em 0.5em; font-size:110%; font-weight:bold;">'''[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Peace_Corps_Wiki:About About PeaceCorpsWiki]''' </div>
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<div style="margin:5px 10px">
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'''Peace Corps Wiki''' is a collaborative project, whose goal is to create a free, interactive, and up-to-date source of information about serving as a Volunteer with the U.S. Peace Corps. Anyone is welcome to edit, add, or change any entry, or start a new one. So far there are a total of [[Special:Statistics|{{NUMBEROFPAGES}}]] pages that have been written and edited by (R)PCVs and Friends of Peace Corps from around the world. This wiki, designed and operated by returned Peace Corps Volunteers with no government funding, provides the transparency called for by President Obama to enable the public and potential Peace Corps Volunteers to view extensive information about the agency's operations and Peace Corps service.
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<center><i>To get started try a [[Help:Contents|small tutorial]], or go to a [[Special:Random|random page...]]</i></center>
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</div>
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Outside larger cities and towns in Botswana, residents of rural communities may have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Botswana are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
  
 +
To ease the transition and adapt to life in Botswana, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations.  The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.
  
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===Overview of Diversity in Botswana===
| align="center"|   
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| align="center"| <!-- [[News|News by country]] -->
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| align="center"| <!-- [[News by state|News by state]] -->
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<!-- ***********************  Statistics *****************
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The Peace Corps staff in Botswana recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations, and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.
  
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===What Might a Volunteer Face?===
<div style="border-bottom:1px solid #adc687; border-top:1px solid #adc687;background-color:#d3e5b8; padding:0.2em 0.5em 0.2em 0.5em; font-size:110%; font-weight:bold;">'''Statistics'''</div>
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<div style="padding:5px 20px;">
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* [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/reports/Out-of-100.xls Out of 100]
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* [[Early Termination]]
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* [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/FY2009Volunteers.xls Volunteers by country (FY09)]
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* [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/FOIAdocs/FY2008Volunteers.xls Volunteers by country (FY08)]
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* [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/PeaceCorpsFY08FY09.xls Comparison: FY09 with FY08]
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* [[Departures by month]]
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* [[Volunteer Allowances]]
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* [[Volunteer_allowance_rates]]
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
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* [[The Safety of the Volunteer | Safety Statistics]]
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* [[The Health of the Volunteer | Health Statistics]]
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* [[Dissertations relating to Peace Corps | Dissertations]]
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* [http://knol.google.com/k/andrew-czernek/peace-corps-volunteers/o4q327ykmzte/5# Studies of PCVs]
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* [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/Wiki_and_Journals_Stats_Sept_2009.pdf Wiki and Journals statistics]
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</div><br><div style="height:-1em; clear:both;"></div>
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====Possible Issues for Female Volunteers====
  
 +
To address restrictive laws and traditions of its society, Botswana has a constitution that protects women’s rights.
  
 +
The country has made great strides in gender equity in the modern sector, and ministerial, senior-level government, and private-sector posts are held by women. In addition, the government has developed a national gender program to improve the lives of vulnerable women. Nevertheless, rural, less educated women at the lower end of the socioeconomic scale tend to have less authority and responsibility than men do for income, spending, and reproductive health. Although this is changing, many rural communities have not had much experience with women who take on professional roles, remain unmarried, and live away from their families. Thus, female Volunteers may experience a great deal of unwanted attention and may need to practice discretion in public.  During both cross-cultural and safety training sessions, all Volunteers are provided with strategies and practice in limiting and responding to unwanted attention.
  
| style="padding:0em 0.5em 0em 0.5em; background:white" |
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====Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color====
| style="width:40%; vertical-align:top; border:0px solid #adc687; background-color:#e9f2da;" |
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 +
Most Batswana in cities and towns are aware of the different racial and ethnic groups that exist in the United States.  However, this level of knowledge and understanding greatly diminishes among rural populations. African-American Volunteers may not be recognized as Americans. They may be expected to learn local languages more quickly than other Volunteers, may be accepted more readily into the culture than other Volunteers, and may be treated according to local social norms because they are assumed to be African.
  
 +
Hispanic American and Asian-American Volunteers may also be perceived as not being American. Batswana may expect Asian Americans to exhibit stereotyped behavior observed in films, sometimes referred to as the “kung fu syndrome.” In addition, the presence of Asian merchants in the country may have an impact on how Asian-American Volunteers are perceived.
  
 +
====Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers====
  
 +
In Botswana, older members of society are viewed and treated with a great deal of respect. Issues for older Volunteers are more likely to be in relation to their younger fellow Volunteers. Older Volunteers may meet individuals in the Peace Corps community who have little understanding of or respect for the lives and experiences of senior Americans and may not be able to offer the necessary personal support. Older Volunteers, in turn, may be inclined to withdraw from full participation in order to “give the younger folks their turn,” and may be reluctant to share personal, sexual, or health concerns. They may not find appropriate role models among the Peace Corps staff or may find that younger Volunteers look to them for more advice than they feel comfortable giving. Finally, older Volunteers may need to be assertive about asking for an effective individual approach to language learning during pre-service training.
  
 +
====Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers====
  
<!-- *********************** RESOURCES ***************** -->   
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In general, Botswana view homosexuality as immoral; it is illegal according to the country’s constitution. Homosexuality certainly exists in Botswana but not with the same level of acceptance as in the United States. Because of cultural norms, homosexual Volunteers may discover that they cannot be open about their sexual orientation and have to serve for two years without revealing to their community that they are gay. Homosexual or bisexual Volunteers may also serve for two years without meeting another homosexual or bisexual Volunteer. Lesbians, like all American women, are likely to have to deal with constant questions about boyfriends, marriage, and sex, while gay men may have to deal with machismo: talk of sexual conquests, girl watching, and dirty jokes.
<div style="vertical-align:top; border-bottom:1px solid #adc687; border-top:1px solid #adc687;background-color:#d3e5b8; padding:0.2em 0.5em 0.2em 0.5em; font-size:110%; font-weight:bold;">'''[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Category:Resources Resources]'''</div>
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<div style="padding:5px 5px">
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*<b>[[Timeline|STAGING DATES]]</b>
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*[[Advice for applicants]]
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*[[Application Process]]
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*[[Application Timelines]]
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*[[Calculator|Calculator(Placement)]]   
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*[[Congressional Appropriations]]   
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*[[Volunteer discounts|Discounts for Volunteers]]   
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*[[Previous volunteer news|Featured Volunteer News]]
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*[[FOIA|Freedom of Information Act]]
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*[[Interview Questions]]
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*[[Medical Information]]   
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*[[Peace Corps events]]
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*[[Phone Directory]]
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*[[Previous Contributor Highlights]]
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*[[Previous did you know?]]
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*[[Puzey Act volunteer surveys]]   
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*[[Training]]
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*[[Unofficial Volunteer Handbook]]
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*[[Whistle Blowers]]   
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*[[Peace_Corps_Political_Appointees|2011 Political Appointees]]
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*[[Staff_consultants|2010 Staff Consultants]]
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*[[2010 Staff Directory]] 
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*[[2008 Biennial Volunteer Survey]]
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</div>
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<!-- *********************** STATISTICS ***************** -->   
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<!-- *********************** THINGS TO DO TO HELP ***************** -->   
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'''See also:''' Articles about Botswana on the National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Peace Corps Alumni Association website at http://www.lgbrpcv.org/articles.htm
  
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====Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers====
  
<br clear="all"/></div>
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Most Batswana have some religious affiliation, and many attend church regularly. Both Christian and non-Christian Volunteers may be expected to attend church with the members of their community. They may be asked to explain why they do not belong to a certain Christian denomination or may be actively recruited by a Christian group. Volunteers may not be able to adequately convey their own religious beliefs because of language or cultural barriers. This kind of doing is exactly what Batswana are doing and they are influenced by that.
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====Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities====
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There is very little infrastructure in Botswana to accommodate individuals with disabilities. Disabled Volunteers may find living in rural communities particularly challenging.  Nevertheless, the Peace Corps’ Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable of performing a full tour of Volunteer service in Botswana without unreasonable risk to yourself or interruption of your service. Peace Corps/Botswana staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations in projects, training, housing, job sites, and other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.  
|-
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<!-- *********************** ABOUT PEACE CORPS ***************** -->   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); background-color: rgb(255, 233, 210); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px 8px 8px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[[What Do Volunteers Do?|About Peace Corps]]<sup>''[[What Do Volunteers Do?|more]]''</sup></div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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Since 1961, the Peace Corps has shared with the world America's most precious resource—its people. Peace Corps Volunteers serve in 73 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central and South America, Europe, and the Middle East. Collaborating with local community members, Volunteers work in areas like education, youth outreach and community development, the environment, and information technology.  
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*[[What Do Volunteers Do?]]   
 
*[[What is the Peace Corps?]]   
 
*[[Where Do Volunteers Go?]]   
 
*[[How Do I Become a Volunteer?]]   
 
*[[Who Volunteers?]]   
 
*[[What Are the Benefits?]]   
 
*[[What About Safety?]]
 
*[[Is Peace Corps a form of National Service (similar to the military)?]]
 
</div>   
 
<!-- *********************** CURRENT VOLUNTEERS ***************** -->   
 
| style="border: 1px solid rgb(136, 152, 191); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(136, 152, 191); background-color: rgb(168, 211, 255); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px 8px 8px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[[Current Volunteers]]<sup>''[[Current Volunteers|more]]''</sup></div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
 
Serving for two years in the Peace Corps may seem like a long time, but Close of Service may come faster than you expect. Volunteers can make the most of their time in-country through well organized material, collaboration and knowledge sharing. <span style="color: red;">[[Current Volunteers]]</span> should still keep in mind their own safety and security, cultural sensitivity, and the fact they are in-country representing the United States. See Manual [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/manual/MS204.html Section 204] regarding Volunteer conduct and [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/manual/MS543.html Section 543] regarding Volunteer use of information technology tools.   
 
  
*[[Description of Service|Description of Service (DOS)]]   
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[[Category:Botswana]]
*[[Grant Resources and Project Funding]]   
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*[[Material Resources]]   
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*[http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/manual/ Peace Corps Manual]   
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*[[Project Ideas]]   
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*[http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ Volunteer Journals]   
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*[[Volunteer Tips]]   
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*[[Volunteer Health]]
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*[[Add_a_Volunteer|Add a page on yourself]]
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</div>   
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<!-- *********************** RETURNED VOLUNTEERS ***************** -->   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); background-color: rgb(255, 233, 210); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[[RPCV Associations|Returned Volunteers]]''<sup>[[RPCV Associations|more]]</sup>''</div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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Your time as a Peace Corps Volunteer doesn't end when your two years of service are over. The time you spent in the Peace Corps will continue to enrich your life, both personally and professionally, for many years. And, in keeping with the Peace Corps' third goal, you'll have new opportunities every day to share what you've learned in the Peace Corps with fellow Americans.   
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*[[Add_a_Volunteer|Add a page on yourself]]
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*[[RPCV Associations|Affiliate Groups]]   
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*[[Hotline]]   
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*[[Career Resources]]   
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*[[Continuing Services]]   
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*[[Benefits]]   
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*[[Returned Volunteers FAQs]]
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</div>
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|}
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{| cellspacing="10" cellpadding="0" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"
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|-
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<!-- *********************** PRESS RELEASES ***************** -->   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); background-color: rgb(255, 233, 210); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px 8px 8px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.media.press Press Releases]</div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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<rss>http://www.peacecorps.gov/rss/peacecorpsnews.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|date|max=10</rss>   
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</div>   
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<!-- *********************** PODCASTS ***************** -->   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(136, 152, 191); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(136, 152, 191); background-color: rgb(168, 211, 255); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px 8px 8px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/multimedia/podcasts/ Peace Corps Podcasts]</div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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<rss>http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/multimedia/podcasts/rss.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|date|max=20</rss>   
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</div>   
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<!-- *********************** NEW FOIA ***************** -->   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); background-color: rgb(255, 233, 210); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[[FOIA Documents|Freedom of Information Act]]</div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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<div style="padding:0px 20px;">
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{{#ask:[[FOIA request number::+]][[FOIA requested::<{{CURRENTYEAR}}-{{CURRENTMONTH}}-{{CURRENTDAY}}]]|? FOIA summary=|format=ul|sort=FOIA requested|order=descending|limit=4}}
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For the lasted FOIA Requests check:[[FOIA Documents]].   
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Generated semantically from information on the [[:Category:FOIA requests]].
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</div>
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<!-- *********************** RPCV OPPORTUNITIES *****************   
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| style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); width: 33%; vertical-align: top; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" | <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(255, 188, 121); background-color: rgb(255, 233, 210); font-size: 1px; height: 8px;"></div> <div style="margin: 5px; float: right;"></div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170); padding: 5px; font-family: Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; font-weight: bold;">[http://www.vv-vv.com/npca/ RPCV Opportunities]</div> <div style="padding: 5px; font-size: 9pt;">
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<rss>http://www.vv-vv.com/npca/feed/NKRT-latestposting.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|date|max=5</rss>   
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</div>
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|}
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-->
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<!-- *********************** DISCLAIMER ***************** -->   
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'''''Peace Corps Wiki''' welcomes all'' objective ''points of view about Peace Corps, including the negative aspects of volunteer service. That being said, all articles and contents should be written from a neutral point of view, representing views fairly, proportionately, and with a balanced perceptive of the issue.'' '''Disclaimer: The contents of this Web site belong to the wiki's members and do not reflect any position of the U.S. Government or the Peace Corps.''' '''''For official Peace Corps policy, please see their [http://www.peacecorps.gov/ official website]'''''
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Latest revision as of 12:38, 8 December 2015

Country Resources

In fulfilling the Peace Corps’ mandate to share the face of America with our host countries, we are making special efforts to see that all of America’s richness is reflected in the Volunteer corps. More Americans of color are serving in today’s Peace Corps than at any time in recent years. Differences in race, ethnic background, age, religion, and sexual orientation are expected and welcomed among our Volunteers. Part of the Peace Corps’ mission is to help dispel any notion that Americans are all of one origin or race and to establish that each of us is as thoroughly American as the other despite our many differences.

Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Botswana, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Botswana.

Outside larger cities and towns in Botswana, residents of rural communities may have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Botswana are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

To ease the transition and adapt to life in Botswana, you may need to make some temporary, yet fundamental compromises in how you present yourself as an American and as an individual. For example, female trainees and Volunteers may not be able to exercise the independence available to them in the United States; political discussions need to be handled with great care; and some of your personal beliefs may best remain undisclosed. You will need to develop techniques and personal strategies for coping with these and other limitations. The Peace Corps staff will lead diversity and sensitivity discussions during your pre-service training and will be on call to provide support, but the challenge ultimately will be your own.

Overview of Diversity in Botswana[edit]

The Peace Corps staff in Botswana recognizes the adjustment issues that come with diversity and will endeavor to provide support and guidance. During pre-service training, several sessions will be held to discuss diversity and coping mechanisms. We look forward to having male and female Volunteers from a variety of races, ethnic groups, ages, religions, and sexual orientations, and hope that you will become part of a diverse group of Americans who take pride in supporting one another and demonstrating the richness of American culture.

What Might a Volunteer Face?[edit]

Possible Issues for Female Volunteers[edit]

To address restrictive laws and traditions of its society, Botswana has a constitution that protects women’s rights.

The country has made great strides in gender equity in the modern sector, and ministerial, senior-level government, and private-sector posts are held by women. In addition, the government has developed a national gender program to improve the lives of vulnerable women. Nevertheless, rural, less educated women at the lower end of the socioeconomic scale tend to have less authority and responsibility than men do for income, spending, and reproductive health. Although this is changing, many rural communities have not had much experience with women who take on professional roles, remain unmarried, and live away from their families. Thus, female Volunteers may experience a great deal of unwanted attention and may need to practice discretion in public. During both cross-cultural and safety training sessions, all Volunteers are provided with strategies and practice in limiting and responding to unwanted attention.

Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color[edit]

Most Batswana in cities and towns are aware of the different racial and ethnic groups that exist in the United States. However, this level of knowledge and understanding greatly diminishes among rural populations. African-American Volunteers may not be recognized as Americans. They may be expected to learn local languages more quickly than other Volunteers, may be accepted more readily into the culture than other Volunteers, and may be treated according to local social norms because they are assumed to be African.

Hispanic American and Asian-American Volunteers may also be perceived as not being American. Batswana may expect Asian Americans to exhibit stereotyped behavior observed in films, sometimes referred to as the “kung fu syndrome.” In addition, the presence of Asian merchants in the country may have an impact on how Asian-American Volunteers are perceived.

Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers[edit]

In Botswana, older members of society are viewed and treated with a great deal of respect. Issues for older Volunteers are more likely to be in relation to their younger fellow Volunteers. Older Volunteers may meet individuals in the Peace Corps community who have little understanding of or respect for the lives and experiences of senior Americans and may not be able to offer the necessary personal support. Older Volunteers, in turn, may be inclined to withdraw from full participation in order to “give the younger folks their turn,” and may be reluctant to share personal, sexual, or health concerns. They may not find appropriate role models among the Peace Corps staff or may find that younger Volunteers look to them for more advice than they feel comfortable giving. Finally, older Volunteers may need to be assertive about asking for an effective individual approach to language learning during pre-service training.

Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers[edit]

In general, Botswana view homosexuality as immoral; it is illegal according to the country’s constitution. Homosexuality certainly exists in Botswana but not with the same level of acceptance as in the United States. Because of cultural norms, homosexual Volunteers may discover that they cannot be open about their sexual orientation and have to serve for two years without revealing to their community that they are gay. Homosexual or bisexual Volunteers may also serve for two years without meeting another homosexual or bisexual Volunteer. Lesbians, like all American women, are likely to have to deal with constant questions about boyfriends, marriage, and sex, while gay men may have to deal with machismo: talk of sexual conquests, girl watching, and dirty jokes.

See also: Articles about Botswana on the National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Peace Corps Alumni Association website at http://www.lgbrpcv.org/articles.htm

Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers[edit]

Most Batswana have some religious affiliation, and many attend church regularly. Both Christian and non-Christian Volunteers may be expected to attend church with the members of their community. They may be asked to explain why they do not belong to a certain Christian denomination or may be actively recruited by a Christian group. Volunteers may not be able to adequately convey their own religious beliefs because of language or cultural barriers. This kind of doing is exactly what Batswana are doing and they are influenced by that.

Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities[edit]

There is very little infrastructure in Botswana to accommodate individuals with disabilities. Disabled Volunteers may find living in rural communities particularly challenging. Nevertheless, the Peace Corps’ Office of Medical Services determined that you were physically and emotionally capable of performing a full tour of Volunteer service in Botswana without unreasonable risk to yourself or interruption of your service. Peace Corps/Botswana staff will work with disabled Volunteers to make reasonable accommodations in projects, training, housing, job sites, and other areas to enable them to serve safely and effectively.