Difference between pages "Packing list for Bangladesh" and "History of the Peace Corps in Malawi"

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{{History_of_the_Peace_Corps_by_country}}
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Bangladesh and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80pound weight limit on baggage. Because you will acquire a lot of stuff during training (e.g., books, bedding, a mosquito net, and a medical kit), you should leave some space in your luggage for these items or plan to purchase an additional bag after you arrive in Bangladesh. Do not bring anything of great monetary or sentimental value, and consider obtaining insurance for valuable belongings before you leave the United States. Remember that you can get almost everything you need in Bangladesh. Cotton is the most comfortable material for clothing, including underwear, in hot and humid weather, but you may also want to bring some warmer clothes for travel (e.g., fleece). The tailors in Bangladesh will copy clothing for a reasonable price, so you might want to bring a few pictures or patterns with you. If you plan to go trekking in another country, such as Nepal or India, bring some hiking shoes or boots, preferably already broken in. Regular shoes can be purchased locally in sizes up to 9 for women and 10 for men.
 
  
===General Clothing===
 
  
===For Women===
 
  
* Several cotton dresses with sleeves or skirts and tops
 
* At least three pairs of lightweight, baggy pants
 
* Several loose-fitting T-shirts
 
* Enough cotton underwear for two years (i.e., at least eight bras and 12 pairs of underpants)
 
* Cotton nightgowns (can easily be made in Bangladesh)
 
* Two sweaters or sweatshirts and two pairs of jeans or sweatpants for colder weather
 
* One lightweight, waterproof jacket or poncho
 
* One warm jacket for the winter season and travel
 
* Cotton socks
 
* One swimsuit (not available locally)
 
* One outfit for formal occasions with suitable shoes
 
  
===For Men===
+
The first Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in Malawi just prior to independence in 1963. Most Volunteers worked on education and health projects, and numbers quickly grew to more than 350 Volunteers. In total, more than 2,300 Americans have served as Peace Corps Volunteers in Malawi.  Under the very conservative Banda regime, the program was suspended for several years due to the “non-conformist” role of some Volunteers, but the program was restored in 1978.  Since that time, the program has developed a close working relationship with the government of Malawi.
  
* At least three pairs of lightweight cotton pants
+
The change of government in 1994 opened up the possibility of re-placing Volunteers in rural villages (under the prior regime, foreigners had been suspended from living at the village level). With the increased flexibility in programming, the Peace Corps began working with counterpart ministries to focus programming efforts and identify more appropriate areas for collaboration at the community level. Currently, there are approximately 100 Volunteers working in the health, education, and environment sectors.
* Several lightweight cotton shirts, both long and short sleeved
+
* One pair of jeans or other durable pants
+
* One pair of baggy shorts
+
* Several cotton T-shirts
+
* At least 12 pairs of underpants (boxers are cooler)
+
* Two or three cotton undershirts, if you wear them (available locally)  
+
* Swimming trunks
+
* Pajamas (if you wear them)
+
* Two sweaters or sweatshirts for colder weather
+
* One lightweight, waterproof jacket or poncho
+
* One warm jacket for the winter season and travel
+
* A jacket and tie for formal occasions with suitable shoes
+
  
===Shoes===
 
  
* Flip-flops and sandals (slip-on sandals are good for easy removal when entering someone’s home; smaller sizes can be purchased cheaply in Bangladesh)
+
===History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in Malawi ===
* Sneakers (available locally in smaller sizes)
+
* One pair of dress shoes for formal occasions
+
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items===
+
Peace Corps/Malawi focuses on three main areas of vital need: health, education, and natural resource management. These projects have evolved over the years based on the needs of the government and communities with whom the Peace Corps works.
  
* Tea tree oil (helpful for acne, cold sores, heat rash, insect bites, fungus, etc.)
+
===Community Health Project ===
* Sunscreen—although the Peace Corps medical kit con tains sunscreen, if you have sensitive skin or a favorite brand, you may want to bring some of your own
+
* Towel
+
* Enough shampoo, toothpaste, etc. for your first few days in-country Kitchen
+
* Plastic food storage bags of all sizes (also good for pro tecting papers and other items during the rainy season)
+
* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene brand, available at outdoor stores)
+
* Can opener
+
  
===Miscellaneous===
+
Malawi ranks among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic and is also severely affected by many other serious health conditions. The Peace Corps HIV/AIDS and community health project (CHP) works in collaboration with the National AIDS Control Program and the Ministry of Health to address some of the health issues in rural areas.  Volunteers work in areas of AIDS education, orphan care, home-based care, youth and at-risk groups, child survival activities, nutrition, disease prevention, environmental health, and women’s health issues. A few Peace Corps Volunteers work in nursing colleges as educators for health professionals.  For many years, Peace Corps/Malawi had the only stand-alone HIV/AIDS project in the Peace Corps, and HIV/AIDS continues to be the cornerstone for health activities.
  
* Film (all kinds of film are available in Dhaka, but the selection outside the capital may be limited)
+
The AIDS pandemic strikes across all social strata in many Peace Corps countries. The loss of teachers has crippled education systems, while illness and disability drains family income and forces governments and donors to redirect limited resources from other priorities. The fear and uncertainty AIDS causes has led to increased domestic violence and stigmatizing of people living with HIV/AIDS, isolating them from friends and family and cutting them off from economic opportunities. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will confront these issues on a very personal level. It is important to be aware of the high emotional toll that disease, death, and violence can have on Volunteers. As you strive to integrate into your community, you will develop relationships with local people who might die during your service. Because of the AIDS pandemic, some Volunteers will be regularly meeting with HIV-positive people and working with training staff, office staff, and host family members living with AIDS. Volunteers need to prepare themselves to embrace these relationships in a sensitive and positive manner. Likewise, malaria and malnutrition, motor vehicle accidents and other unintentional injuries, domestic violence and corporal punishment are problems a Volunteer may confront. You will need to anticipate these situations and utilize supportive resources available throughout your training and service to maintain your own emotional strength so that you can continue to be of service to your community.
* Pocket-size flashlight (useful during power cuts and for travel to places without electricity)
+
 
* Tape player or Walkman (also available in Dhaka) and your favorite CDs or cassettes 85
+
===Secondary Education Project ===
* Batteries—rechargeable ones with a 220-volt charger are especially useful (Volunteers recommend the Rayovac charger and alkaline batteries)
+
 
* Backpack for travel
+
Peace Corps/Malawi’s secondary education project (SEP) provides teachers and teacher trainers to community day secondary schools (CDSS), which are community started and supported institutions. Volunteers teach physical science, mathematics, biology, and English. The Malawi educational system has undergone serious stress and deterioration in the past few years. The initiation of free primary education in 1994 has greatly increased the need for schools and teachers.  The project emphasizes girls’ education and life skills training and uses community content-based instruction techniques.
* Lightweight sleeping bag (for travel on trains and buses or in guest houses where bedding is not provided)
+
 
* A small musical instrument (not a valuable one) and music, if you play or sing (note that good-quality guitar strings are not easy to find locally and that instruments can warp in Bangladesh’s climate)
+
===Community-Based Natural Resources Management===
* Photos of your family and home
+
 
* Portable games like Scrabble, chess, and playing cards
+
This project focuses on community-based management of natural resources in protected areas such as national parks, game reserves, and forest reserves. Volunteers work with border communities that want to use protected area resources more efficiently and sustainably. Volunteers’ work is accompanied by the promotion of sustainable agricultural practices, income-generating activities, and agroforestry interventions requested by communities bordering parks and reserves. Volunteers work with community groups by helping them to identify and prioritize needs via a community assessment process and then by implementing local projects that address the identified needs. Volunteers also serve as liaisons between parks and wildlife and forestry staff and local communities.
* Diary or journal
+
 
* Travel guides for Bangladesh and any nearby countries you hope to visit
+
===Assignment History===
* Sunglasses and a sun hat
+
 
* Combination locks for your home and luggage
+
{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
* Swiss army knife or Leatherman tool
+
|-
* Travel alarm clock
+
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
* Money belt or pouch
+
|-
* One or two large plastic containers to protect food and valuable belongings such as cameras from moisture and pests (available locally but the quality varies)
+
| rowspan="6" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
+
| [[Ag Economics]]
[[Category:Bangladesh]]
+
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Education]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Extension]]
 +
| [[1966]]
 +
| [[2003]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Apiculture]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Crop Extension]]
 +
| [[1966]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="8" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
 +
| [[Accounting]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Archictecture]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Advising]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Development]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Computer Science]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Cooperatives]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[NGO Advising]]
 +
| [[2005]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Urban and Regional Planning]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
 +
| [[Crisis Corps]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="18" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
 +
| [[Art Education]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1991]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Gen. Construction]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Economics]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Industrial Arts]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Library Science]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Literacy Ed.]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Occupat. Therapy]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Science Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Univ. English Teaching]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
| [[1989]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="3" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
 +
| [[Environmental Ed.]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Forestry]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[2008]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
| [[2004]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="9" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
 +
| [[Disease Control]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Degreed]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Extension]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Econ/Ext.]]
 +
| [[1966]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
 +
| [[1966]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Med. Technician]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Nursing]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Physical Therapy]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Master's International]]'''
 +
| [[Masters Internationalist]]
 +
| [[1990]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
 +
| [[Unique Skill]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
 +
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
 +
| [[1975]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
 +
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Mechanics]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Road Const/Engin.]]
 +
| [[1974]]
 +
| [[1995]]
 +
|-
 +
|}
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Malawi]]

Latest revision as of 11:40, 21 May 2014

History of the Peace Corps
vvZFOeV9RWw|250}}
Since 1960, when then Senator John F. Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries, more than 182,000 Peace Corps Volunteers have served in 138 countries all over the globe.

See also:



The first Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in Malawi just prior to independence in 1963. Most Volunteers worked on education and health projects, and numbers quickly grew to more than 350 Volunteers. In total, more than 2,300 Americans have served as Peace Corps Volunteers in Malawi. Under the very conservative Banda regime, the program was suspended for several years due to the “non-conformist” role of some Volunteers, but the program was restored in 1978. Since that time, the program has developed a close working relationship with the government of Malawi.

The change of government in 1994 opened up the possibility of re-placing Volunteers in rural villages (under the prior regime, foreigners had been suspended from living at the village level). With the increased flexibility in programming, the Peace Corps began working with counterpart ministries to focus programming efforts and identify more appropriate areas for collaboration at the community level. Currently, there are approximately 100 Volunteers working in the health, education, and environment sectors.


History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in Malawi[edit]

Peace Corps/Malawi focuses on three main areas of vital need: health, education, and natural resource management. These projects have evolved over the years based on the needs of the government and communities with whom the Peace Corps works.

Community Health Project[edit]

Malawi ranks among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic and is also severely affected by many other serious health conditions. The Peace Corps HIV/AIDS and community health project (CHP) works in collaboration with the National AIDS Control Program and the Ministry of Health to address some of the health issues in rural areas. Volunteers work in areas of AIDS education, orphan care, home-based care, youth and at-risk groups, child survival activities, nutrition, disease prevention, environmental health, and women’s health issues. A few Peace Corps Volunteers work in nursing colleges as educators for health professionals. For many years, Peace Corps/Malawi had the only stand-alone HIV/AIDS project in the Peace Corps, and HIV/AIDS continues to be the cornerstone for health activities.

The AIDS pandemic strikes across all social strata in many Peace Corps countries. The loss of teachers has crippled education systems, while illness and disability drains family income and forces governments and donors to redirect limited resources from other priorities. The fear and uncertainty AIDS causes has led to increased domestic violence and stigmatizing of people living with HIV/AIDS, isolating them from friends and family and cutting them off from economic opportunities. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will confront these issues on a very personal level. It is important to be aware of the high emotional toll that disease, death, and violence can have on Volunteers. As you strive to integrate into your community, you will develop relationships with local people who might die during your service. Because of the AIDS pandemic, some Volunteers will be regularly meeting with HIV-positive people and working with training staff, office staff, and host family members living with AIDS. Volunteers need to prepare themselves to embrace these relationships in a sensitive and positive manner. Likewise, malaria and malnutrition, motor vehicle accidents and other unintentional injuries, domestic violence and corporal punishment are problems a Volunteer may confront. You will need to anticipate these situations and utilize supportive resources available throughout your training and service to maintain your own emotional strength so that you can continue to be of service to your community.

Secondary Education Project[edit]

Peace Corps/Malawi’s secondary education project (SEP) provides teachers and teacher trainers to community day secondary schools (CDSS), which are community started and supported institutions. Volunteers teach physical science, mathematics, biology, and English. The Malawi educational system has undergone serious stress and deterioration in the past few years. The initiation of free primary education in 1994 has greatly increased the need for schools and teachers. The project emphasizes girls’ education and life skills training and uses community content-based instruction techniques.

Community-Based Natural Resources Management[edit]

This project focuses on community-based management of natural resources in protected areas such as national parks, game reserves, and forest reserves. Volunteers work with border communities that want to use protected area resources more efficiently and sustainably. Volunteers’ work is accompanied by the promotion of sustainable agricultural practices, income-generating activities, and agroforestry interventions requested by communities bordering parks and reserves. Volunteers work with community groups by helping them to identify and prioritize needs via a community assessment process and then by implementing local projects that address the identified needs. Volunteers also serve as liaisons between parks and wildlife and forestry staff and local communities.

Assignment History[edit]

Sector Assignment Beg. Yr End. Yr
Agriculture Ag Economics 1989 2008
Ag Education 1983 1983
Ag Extension 1966 2003
Apiculture 1982 1982
Crop Extension 1966 2008
Fisheries Marine 1984 1984
Business Accounting 1981 1994
Archictecture 1985 1995
Business Advising 1981 2008
Business Development 1997 1997
Computer Science 1991 1996
Cooperatives 1981 1990
NGO Advising 2005 2007
Urban and Regional Planning 1989 1991
Crisis Corps Crisis Corps 1992 2008
Education Art Education 1983 1983
English Teacher 1979 2007
English Teacher Trainer 1989 2007
Fisheries Fresh 1981 1991
Gen. Construction 1980 1989
Home Economics 1981 1984
Industrial Arts 1980 1989
Library Science 1987 1989
Literacy Ed. 1995 1997
Occupat. Therapy 1989 1996
Phys. Ed/Youth Wk 1982 1996
Prim-Ed/Teach Trn 1985 1996
Science Ed/Gen. 1982 1989
Secondary-Ed Math 1985 2007
Secondary-Ed Sci. 1982 2007
Special Ed/Gen. 1990 1996
Univ. English Teaching 1986 1989
Voc. Trainer 1985 1990
Environment Environmental Ed. 1990 2008
Forestry 1984 2008
Protected Areas Management 1987 2004
Health Disease Control 1981 1985
Envir. and Water Resource 1982 1992
Health Degreed 1985 2007
Health Extension 1981 2007
Home Econ/Ext. 1966 1985
Hygiene Ed/Sanitation 1966 1987
Med. Technician 1982 1992
Nursing 1981 1995
Physical Therapy 1983 1996
Master's International Masters Internationalist 1990 1995
Other Unique Skill 1980 1997
UNV United Nations Volunteer 1975 1992
Youth and Community Development Appropriate Tech. 1981 1988
Commun. Serv/Deg. 1981 2007
Mechanics 1981 1981
Road Const/Engin. 1974 1995