Difference between pages "Sewing Lab" and "1970s"

From Peace Corps Wiki
(Difference between pages)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (1 revision imported)
 
m (1 revision imported)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Project
+
==Change and Ambition==
|project=Sewing Lab
 
|projecttype=PCPP
 
|country=Guyana
 
|firstname=E
 
|lastname=Farris
 
|state=Illinois
 
|communityfunds=$405.41
 
|communitypercentage=28%
 
|requestedfunds=$1037.52
 
|neededfunds=$1037.52
 
|projectnumber=504-006
 
|projectyear=2009
 
}}
 
This project is designed to equip the girls and young women of the community with a sewing laboratory, a safe and productive workspace, and a marketable life skill. This will be achieved through the purchase of sewing machines, instructional books, and teaching tools; the young women will then participate in sewing classes at the lab. In addition, two women will be trained as instructors and will begin co-teaching future classes with the Volunteer.
 
  
The community is committed to the success of the project, and has pledged support in a number of ways, including use of space at the local community center and assistance in designing and building necessary furniture. This includes secure storage cupboards and student workstations. The Peace Corps Partnership Program can assist the community by providing funding to purchase sewing machines and instructional materials that will enable us to create a sustainable and self-sufficient sewing lab. The community will ensure the continued success of the project by generating income through craft sales and jobs as seamstresses in the community, and the use of student-instructors who will continue to build their skills and teach lower-level students. Using the money the students earn through the sewing lab, the community can continue to provide necessary supplies for the project in the future.
+
For the Peace Corps, the 1970s are a time of change, far-ranging ambition, and specialized talent.
  
This project has the ability to empower a group of young women and potentially provide them with a means of financial independence. It will also help develop a community that currently lacks significant opportunities for its young people.
+
Despite budget constraints, by December of 1974, Volunteers are serving in 69 countries, the largest number to date. The Peace Corps is working with developing nations as never before to plan and select projects to meet their specific needs. More foreign nationals join the Peace Corps as administrators; by 1973, they comprise more than half of Peace Corps' overseas staff.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
==The Multipler Effect==
 +
 
 +
Volunteers are more qualified than ever. Men and women with professional skills, such as doctors, engineers, and horticulturists, account for more than a fifth of the Volunteers. These Volunteers, Peace Corps officials believe, will have a significant "multiplier effect" - they will transfer their talents to host country nationals who will, in turn, share these skills with their fellow citizens.
 +
 
 +
As the Peace Corps becomes older, so do its Volunteers. The average age of a Volunteer reaches 27, and 5 percent of Volunteers are over 50 years old.
 +
 
 +
In July 1971, the Nixon Administration folds the Peace Corps and several other federal volunteer programs into a new federal volunteer agency called ACTION. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter signs an executive order that grants the Peace Corps full autonomy.
 +
 
 +
At the close of the decade, more than 6,000 Volunteers are at work in the field and two returned Volunteers have been elected to the United States Senate: Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts, who served in Ethiopia from 1962-64; and Christopher Dodd of Connecticut, who was a Volunteer in the Dominican Republic from 1966-68.
 +
 +
==External Links==
 +
[http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=learn.whatispc.history.decades.1970 1970s] Official US Peace Corps Website
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Decades]]

Latest revision as of 12:16, 23 August 2016

Change and Ambition

For the Peace Corps, the 1970s are a time of change, far-ranging ambition, and specialized talent.

Despite budget constraints, by December of 1974, Volunteers are serving in 69 countries, the largest number to date. The Peace Corps is working with developing nations as never before to plan and select projects to meet their specific needs. More foreign nationals join the Peace Corps as administrators; by 1973, they comprise more than half of Peace Corps' overseas staff.


The Multipler Effect

Volunteers are more qualified than ever. Men and women with professional skills, such as doctors, engineers, and horticulturists, account for more than a fifth of the Volunteers. These Volunteers, Peace Corps officials believe, will have a significant "multiplier effect" - they will transfer their talents to host country nationals who will, in turn, share these skills with their fellow citizens.

As the Peace Corps becomes older, so do its Volunteers. The average age of a Volunteer reaches 27, and 5 percent of Volunteers are over 50 years old.

In July 1971, the Nixon Administration folds the Peace Corps and several other federal volunteer programs into a new federal volunteer agency called ACTION. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter signs an executive order that grants the Peace Corps full autonomy.

At the close of the decade, more than 6,000 Volunteers are at work in the field and two returned Volunteers have been elected to the United States Senate: Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts, who served in Ethiopia from 1962-64; and Christopher Dodd of Connecticut, who was a Volunteer in the Dominican Republic from 1966-68.

External Links

1970s Official US Peace Corps Website