Difference between pages "Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Uganda" and "Namibia"

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{{Living_conditions_and_volunteer_lifestyles_by_country}}
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{{CountryboxAlternative
 +
|Countryname= Namibia
 +
|CountryCode = na
 +
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
 +
|Flag= Flag_of_Namibia.svg
 +
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/nawb697.pdf
 +
|Region= [[Africa]]
 +
|CountryDirector= [[Gilbert Collins]]
 +
|Sectors= [[Education]] <br> [[Health and HIV/AIDS]] <br> [[Information and Communications Technology]] <br> [[Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development]]
 +
|ProgramDates= [[1990]] - [[Present]]
 +
|CurrentlyServing= 113
 +
|TotalVolunteers= 1,007
 +
|Languages= [[Afrikaans]], [[Oshikwanyama]], [[Oshindonga]], [[Otjiherero]], [[Rukwangali]] [[English]], [[Oshiwambo]], [[Damara/Nama]], [[Khoekhoegowab]], [[Silozi]], [[Rumanyo]], [[Thimbukushu]], [[Subiya]]
 +
|Map= Wa-map.gif
 +
|stagingdate= Feb 18 2011
 +
|stagingcity= Washington, DC
 +
}}
  
 +
Less than two decades into its independence, Namibia has emerged as a model by establishing political and economic frameworks that give it one of the freest and most open economies in Africa. Namibians are encouraged to participate fully in shaping laws and government policies. Namibia has set a model for advancing the rule of law and encouraging the growth of civil society.
  
===Communications ===
+
The initial planning for the Peace Corps/Namibia program began in 1989, prior to
 +
independence. The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived on September 9, 1990, less than
 +
six months after the country achieved independence.
  
===Mail ===
 
  
Few countries in the world offer the level of service considered normal in the United States. If you expect U.S. standards for mail service, you will be in for some frustration. Letters take a minimum of three weeks to arrive in Uganda if sent by airmail, packages even longer. Packages sent by surface mail can take six months or even longer. Some mail may simply not arrive (fortunately this is not a <span class="plainlinks">[http://goo.gl/LRCVw<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] frequent occurrence, but it does happen). Advise your friends and family to number their letters for tracking purposes and to write “Airmail” and “Par Avion” on their envelopes. If someone sends you a package, it is best to keep it small and use a padded envelope so it will be treated as a letter. Valuables should not be sent through the mail.
+
==Peace Corps History==
  
Despite the delays, we encourage you to write to your family regularly and to number your letters. Family members typically become worried when they do not hear from you, so it is a good idea to advise them that mail service is sporadic and that they should not be concerned if they <span class="plainlinks">[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Business_Plan_Development_Seminars<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] do not receive letters from you regularly. This is especially true at the beginning, when you will be involved in an intense training program.
+
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Namibia]]''
  
Your address during training will be:
+
The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived in Namibia on September 9, 1990, less than six months after the country became independent. By January 1991, the program was in full operation. The primary role of these early Volunteers was to teach English, in support of the new government’s declaration of English as the country’s official language. Classroom teachers also assisted in the transition from Afrikaans to English as the language of instruction in upper primary and secondary schools. In the early 1990s, Volunteers also provided assistance to drought relief efforts and began to work in youth development offices. The number of Volunteers peaked in the late 1990s, reaching a high of almost 150 people. This spike was largely driven by a collaborative effort with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide school-based teacher training throughout the rural north. In August 2009, the first group of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Volunteers arrived in the country.  The new Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development (SEED) program was introduced in 2010.
  
  
 +
Today, about 140 Volunteers work as primary and secondary school teachers, community health workers, information and communications technology facilitators, and small enterprise development agents.
  
“Your Name,” PCT
+
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
  
P.O. Box 29348
+
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Namibia]]''
  
Kampala, Uganda
+
Housing varies considerably. Your site might be a Western-style cement block house, usually with electricity and running water; an apartment attached to a student boarding facility (hostel); or, in the case of more rural junior secondary schools, a room with a local family. As the government has invited assistance from a variety of sources, you may also be asked to share a two- or three-bedroom house with one or two colleagues (either Namibian or Volunteers from other countries). Our expectation is that you will have a private bedroom, but remember that there is a shortage of housing for government staff in most areas in Namibia. The minstry/ hosting agency to which you are assigned is responsible for paying your montly utilities and providing you with the basic furnishings (e.g., bed, charis, tables, stove, and gas refrigerator).
  
 
  
Volunteers in Uganda are allowed to receive packages containing work-related clothing and household items without paying customs fees for six months after arrival. Duty may be charged on food, cosmetics, electronics, and other items not explicitly for work purposes. After training, you will be extpected to establish a mailing address in the community where you are posted. Let family know that the address listed above will be a temporary one used during your first few months in Uganda.
 
  
===Telephones ===
+
==Training==
  
You are unlikely to have access to e-mail or international telephone service during training. International calls can be made in some of the rural regional centers, but connections are unreliable and the cost can be high. Uganda has mobile phone services, and most Volunteers purchase cellular phones here. However, even with a cellphone, having to charge the battery, pay for airtime, and find an area with quality network coverage makes phoning home problematic. It is advisable to make clear to your family and friends that it is not easy to call the United States from Uganda. They should not expect regular communications from you, at least not initially.
+
''Main article: [[Training in Namibia]]''
  
===Computer, Internet, and E-mail Access ===
+
The eight-week training will provide you the opportunity to learn new skills and practice them as they apply to Namibia. You will receive training and orientation in language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Volunteer in Namibia.
  
The Peace Corps does not recommend that you bring a personal computer, since few Volunteers have housing with electricity. If you choose to bring one, it will be at your own expense and risk. Securing it from theft may be a challenge.  
+
During the first week of training, you will stay at a central training facility. During this first week, Trainees will receive information about the types of projects and sites available and will have individual interviews with APCDs and programming staff in order to determine their tentative site placement and language assignment. Trainees will begin language instruction in small groups (typically 3-4 students and an instructor) as well as technical, health/safety, and cross-cultural training during this time.
  
Access to e-mail and the Internet is available at Internet cafes in Kampala, the capital, and in a growing number of towns outside Kampala. You are likely to have access to these occasionally, unless there is an Internet cafe near your site, which is rare. You probably will not have access during pre-service training.  
+
Trainees will also have the opportunity to meet their host families, with whom they will live for approximately 6 weeks, during the first week of training. This homestay will help bring to life some of the topics covered in training, giving you a chance to practice your new language skills and directly observe and participate in Namibian culture.
  
===Housing and Site Location ===
+
At the onset of training, the training staff will outline the competencies that you have to master before becoming a Volunteer and the criteria that will be used to assess achievement of those competencies. Evaluation of your performance during training is a continual process based on a dialogue between you and the training staff. The training manager, along with the language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers, will work with you toward the highest possible achievement of training competencies by providing you with feedback throughout training. After successful completion of pre-service training, you will be sworn in as a Volunteer and make the final preparations for departure to your site.
  
During your service, you will most likely live in a rural area in very modest accommodations provided by your host organization, which will try to provide you with at least a bedroom and a sitting room. You might live in part of a Ugandan family’s house or in part of a house built for staff of a school or a community organization. It is unlikely that you will share your accommodations with anyone else unless you choose to do so.
+
==Health Care and Safety==
  
Living conditions vary according to the resources of the community or organization in which you are placed. Most houses do not have running water or electricity. You should expect to use a pit latrine and a kerosene lantern and stove. Most Volunteers hire someone to carry water to their house. The community may provide some basic furnishings, and you can supplement these with your modest settling-in allowance provided by the Peace Corps. At nearly all sites, the kind of privacy that most Americans are used to will be extremely limited.
+
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Namibia]]''
  
Children may be around constantly, demonstrating their curiosity about you. You will have to adapt to a more public life.  
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Namibia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer, who takes care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services are available at a U.S.-standard hospital in Windhoek. If you become seriously ill, you may be transported to South Africa or back the United States for further treatment.
  
As most communities and organizations have extremely limited resources, providing housing and furnishing is provided at a great sacrifcie. Sometimes there are delays in obtaining housing or furnishings. You might have to stay in temporary accommodations while your permanent housing is being set up.
 
  
Although the Peace Corps staff makes every effort to collaborate with communities to see that housing is ready for Volunteers when they arrive at their site, you should be prepared to gratefully accept whatever the community provides, no matter how basic.
+
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
  
===Living Allowance and Money Management ===
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Namibia]]''
  
As a Volunteer, you will receive a modest living allowance, paid in local currency, that will allow you to live on a par with your colleagues and co-workers. The amount of this allowance is based on regular surveys of Volunteers and the cost of living in Uganda. The allowance is paid quarterly into Volunteer bank accounts, so the ability to manage funds wisely is important. The current living allowance is equivalent to approximately $200 per month and is meant to cover the cost of food, utilities, household supplies, clothing, recreation and entertainment, reading materials, and other incidentals. You may find that you receive more remuneration than your counterpart or supervisor.  
+
In Namibia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Namibia.
  
You will also receive a leave allowance of $24 per month (standard in all Peace Corps countries), which is paid in local currency along with your living allowance.  
+
Outside of Namibia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Namibia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
  
Current Volunteers suggest that you bring cash and credit cards if you plan to travel during your vacations. Only a few establishments in Uganda accept credit cards, so they are mainly useful for travel to other countries. The amount of cash you will need depends on the amount of traveling you plan to do while serving in Uganda (Volunteers earn two days of leave per month of service, excluding training). Some local banks offer ATM cards for local accounts. The exchange rate is approximately 1,800 Ugandan shillings to the U.S. dollar.
+
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 +
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 +
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
  
===Food and Diet ===
 
  
You will buy your food from outdoor markets or small shops, and you will generally cook for yourself. The local diet is basic but healthy, including a variety of fruits, vegetables, starches, and meats. There are likely to be some restaurants at or near your site, and imported food items can be found that, though expensive, provide an occasional treat. During training, there will be sessions on safe food preparation and proper nutrition.  It is relatively easy to follow a vegetarian diet in Uganda after one becomes familiar with the local food. Most Ugandans will not be prepared to serve a vegetarian meal if you are a guest in their home, but will generally accept a sensitive explanation of your dietary preferences.
+
==Frequently Asked Questions==
  
===Transportation ===
+
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 +
|H1r= 44
 +
|H1s= 71.3
 +
|H2r= 37
 +
|H2s= 83.3
 +
|H3r= 54
 +
|H3s= 80.6
 +
|H4r=  9
 +
|H4s=  111.5
 +
|H5r=  42
 +
|H5s=  52
 +
|H6r=  38
 +
|H6s=  81.7
 +
}}
  
Volunteers travel primarily by foot, bicycle, or public transport. Public transportation to and from the nearest urban or trading center is available near every site, in most cases several times a day. Public transport is likely to be crowded, uncomfortable, and unreliable. To facilitate fieldwork,
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Namibia]]''
  
Volunteers are either provided with a bicycle or given an allowance to purchase one. Still, many of the communities and job sites Volunteers visit may entail a long and challenging ride particularly on the single-geared bicycles most common in Uganda. Volunteers in the Education must be able to ride a bicycle in order to do their job. Please come to Uganda with this as an expectation of your work.
+
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Namibia?
 +
* What is the electric current in Namibia?
 +
* How much money should I bring?
 +
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 +
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 +
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 +
* What should I bring as gifts for Namibian friends and my host family?
 +
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 +
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 +
* Can I call home from Namibia?
 +
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 +
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
  
Peace Corps/Uganda prohibits the use of motorcycles by Volunteers because of the extreme safety risks that they pose. When using a bicycle, Volunteers must wear helmets (provided by Peace Corps).
 
  
===Geography and Climate ===
 
  
Uganda straddles the equator, which means that the seasons are quite different from those in the United States. Rather than a hot season and a cold one, there are rainy seasons and dry seasons. Rainy periods generally occur in November and December and in April and May. The climate around Lake Victoria is greatly influenced by the lake. As a result, rain can occur there at any time. Midday temperatures are in the 70s and 80s (depending upon the part of the country) in all seasons, but evenings are cooler and may require wearing a sweater or light jacket.
+
==Packing List==
  
===Social Activities ===
+
''Main article: [[Packing List for Namibia]]''
  
The most common form of entertainment is socializing among friends and neighbors. Some Volunteers visit other Volunteers on weekends or holidays. Peace Corps encourages Volunteers to remain at their sites as much as possible to develop relationships with community members, but it also recognizes that they need to make infrequent trips to regional centers and to visit friends. Uganda has several rural radio stations, and many Volunteers bring shortwave radios so that they can listen to international broadcasts by the BBC, Voice of America, and Deutsche Welle.  Some larger towns have cinemas as well.  
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Namibia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, because of Namibia’s proximity to South Africa, you can get almost everything you need in Namibia at prices comparable to those in the United States.
  
You will find it easy to make friends in your community and to participate in weddings, funerals, birthday celebrations, and other social events. It is impossible to overemphasize the rewards of establishing rapport with one’s supervisors, co-workers, and other community members. A sincere effort to learn the local language will greatly facilitate these interactions.
+
* General Clothing
 +
* Shoes
 +
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 +
* Kitchen
 +
* Miscellaneous
 +
* Things we shouldn’t have brought
  
===Professionalism, Dress, and Behavior ===
+
==Peace Corps News==
  
Norms for dress are much more conservative in Uganda than in the United States, where we view our clothes as an expression of our individuality. Ugandans view dressing appropriately as a sign of respect for others. Wearing clothes that are dirty, have holes in them, or are too revealing sends the message that the people you are interacting with are not worth greater care. Dressing in neat, clean, and conservative clothes, on the other hand, can ease your integration into your new community and enhance your professional credibility and effectiveness in your assignment.
+
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
  
Many Ugandan men wear jackets and ties in professional settings. Blue jeans, T-shirts, and casual sandals are not considered appropriate in the workplace, during training, or during visits to the Peace Corps office. Women wear dresses or skirts with tops in both professional and nonprofessional environments; short skirts and low-cut or sleeveless tops are highly inappropriate, particularly in rural settings. Male Volunteers must wear their hair short and neat. Volunteers doing fieldwork generally should wash up and change their clothes before returning to a public area. When riding bicycles, women wear skirts or split skirts/culottes.
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22namibia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
  
If you have reservations about your ability to adapt to
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/wa/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
  
Ugandan norms of dress and appearance, you should reevaluate your decision to become a Volunteer. Working effectively in another culture requires a certain level of sacrifice and flexibility, and the Peace Corps expects Volunteers to behave in a manner that will foster respect within their communities and reflect well on the Peace Corps. Behavior that jeopardizes your safety or the presence of the Peace Corps program in Uganda could lead to administrative separation—a decision by the Peace Corps to terminate your service.
+
==Country Fund==
  
===Personal Safety ===
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=697-CFD Namibia Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Namibia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
  
'''RAWRRR'''As stated in the Volunteer Handbook, becoming a Peace Corps Volunteer entails certain safety risks. Living and traveling in an unfamiliar environment (often alone), having a limited understanding of local language and culture, and being perceived as well-off are some of the factors that can put a Volunteer at risk. Many Volunteers experience varying degrees of unwanted attention and harassment. Petty thefts and burglaries are not uncommon, and incidents of physical and sexual assault do occur, although most Uganda Volunteers complete their two years of service without personal security incidents. The Peace Corps has established procedures and policies designed to help Volunteers reduce their risks and enhance their safety and security. These procedures and policies, in addition to safety training, will be provided once you arrive in Uganda. At the same time, you are expected to take responsibility for your safety and well-being.
+
==See also==
 +
* [[List of resources for Namibia]]
 +
* [[Volunteers who served in Namibia]]
 +
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 +
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
  
===Rewards and Frustrations ===
+
==External links==
 +
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/wa.html Peace Corps Journals - Namibia]
  
Although the potential for job satisfaction in Uganda is quite high, like all Volunteers, you will encounter numerous frustrations. Perceptions of time are very different from those in
+
[[Category:Namibia]] [[Category:Africa]]
 
+
[[Category:Country]]
America. The lack of basic infrastructure can become very tiring, and social demands on your colleagues may mean that their work habits vary greatly from yours. For these reasons, the Peace Corps experience of adapting to a new culture and environment is often described as a series of emotional peaks and valleys.
 
 
 
You will be given a great deal of responsibility and independence in your work—perhaps more than in any other job you have had or will have. You will often need to motivate yourself and others with little guidance from supervisors. You might work for months without seeing any visible impact from, or without receiving feedback on, your work. Development is a slow process. You must possess the self-confidence, patience, and vision—tempered with humility and the resulting respect for others—to continue working toward long-term goals without seeing immediate results.  To overcome these difficulties, you will also need maturity, flexibility, open-mindedness, resourcefulness, and, most important, a sense of humor. Most Volunteers manage to exhibit enough of these characteristics to serve successfully.  Judging by the experience of former Volunteers, the peaks are well worth the difficult times, and most Volunteers leave Uganda feeling that they have gained much more than they sacrificed during their service. If you are able to make the commitment to integrate into your community and to focus on the community’s interests, your service is likely to be a life-altering experience.
 
 
 
 
 
[[Category:Uganda]]
 

Latest revision as of 13:02, 23 August 2016


US Peace Corps
Country name is::Namibia


Status: ACTIVE
Staging: {{#ask:Country staging date::+country name is::Namibia[[Staging date::>2016-10-1]]

mainlabel=- ?staging date= ?staging city= format=list sort=Staging date

}}


American Overseas Staff (FY2010): {{#ask:2010_pcstaff_salary::+country name is::Namibia

mainlabel=- ?Grade_staff= ?Lastname_staff= ?Firstname_staff= ?Middlename_staff= ?Initial_staff= ?Salary_staff=$ format=list sort=Grade_staff

}}


Latest Early Termination Rates (FOIA 11-058): {{#ask:Country_early_termination_rate::+country name is::Namibia

mainlabel=- ?2005_early_termination=2005 ?2006_early_termination=2006 ?2007_early_termination=2007 ?2008_early_termination=2008 format=list

}}


Peace Corps Journals - Namibia File:Feedicon.gif

250px
Peace Corps Welcome Book
Region:

Africa

Country Director:

Gilbert Collins

Sectors:

Education
Health and HIV/AIDS
Information and Communications Technology
Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development

Program Dates:

1990 - Present

Current Volunteers:

113

Total Volunteers:

1,007

Languages Spoken:

Afrikaans, Oshikwanyama, Oshindonga, Otjiherero, Rukwangali English, Oshiwambo, Damara/Nama, Khoekhoegowab, Silozi, Rumanyo, Thimbukushu, Subiya

Flag:

150px

__SHOWFACTBOX__

Less than two decades into its independence, Namibia has emerged as a model by establishing political and economic frameworks that give it one of the freest and most open economies in Africa. Namibians are encouraged to participate fully in shaping laws and government policies. Namibia has set a model for advancing the rule of law and encouraging the growth of civil society.

The initial planning for the Peace Corps/Namibia program began in 1989, prior to independence. The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived on September 9, 1990, less than six months after the country achieved independence.


Peace Corps History

Main article: History of the Peace Corps in Namibia

The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived in Namibia on September 9, 1990, less than six months after the country became independent. By January 1991, the program was in full operation. The primary role of these early Volunteers was to teach English, in support of the new government’s declaration of English as the country’s official language. Classroom teachers also assisted in the transition from Afrikaans to English as the language of instruction in upper primary and secondary schools. In the early 1990s, Volunteers also provided assistance to drought relief efforts and began to work in youth development offices. The number of Volunteers peaked in the late 1990s, reaching a high of almost 150 people. This spike was largely driven by a collaborative effort with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide school-based teacher training throughout the rural north. In August 2009, the first group of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Volunteers arrived in the country. The new Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development (SEED) program was introduced in 2010.


Today, about 140 Volunteers work as primary and secondary school teachers, community health workers, information and communications technology facilitators, and small enterprise development agents.

Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle

Main article: Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Namibia

Housing varies considerably. Your site might be a Western-style cement block house, usually with electricity and running water; an apartment attached to a student boarding facility (hostel); or, in the case of more rural junior secondary schools, a room with a local family. As the government has invited assistance from a variety of sources, you may also be asked to share a two- or three-bedroom house with one or two colleagues (either Namibian or Volunteers from other countries). Our expectation is that you will have a private bedroom, but remember that there is a shortage of housing for government staff in most areas in Namibia. The minstry/ hosting agency to which you are assigned is responsible for paying your montly utilities and providing you with the basic furnishings (e.g., bed, charis, tables, stove, and gas refrigerator).


Training

Main article: Training in Namibia

The eight-week training will provide you the opportunity to learn new skills and practice them as they apply to Namibia. You will receive training and orientation in language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Volunteer in Namibia.

During the first week of training, you will stay at a central training facility. During this first week, Trainees will receive information about the types of projects and sites available and will have individual interviews with APCDs and programming staff in order to determine their tentative site placement and language assignment. Trainees will begin language instruction in small groups (typically 3-4 students and an instructor) as well as technical, health/safety, and cross-cultural training during this time.

Trainees will also have the opportunity to meet their host families, with whom they will live for approximately 6 weeks, during the first week of training. This homestay will help bring to life some of the topics covered in training, giving you a chance to practice your new language skills and directly observe and participate in Namibian culture.

At the onset of training, the training staff will outline the competencies that you have to master before becoming a Volunteer and the criteria that will be used to assess achievement of those competencies. Evaluation of your performance during training is a continual process based on a dialogue between you and the training staff. The training manager, along with the language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers, will work with you toward the highest possible achievement of training competencies by providing you with feedback throughout training. After successful completion of pre-service training, you will be sworn in as a Volunteer and make the final preparations for departure to your site.

Health Care and Safety

Main article: Health Care and Safety in Namibia

The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Namibia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer, who takes care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services are available at a U.S.-standard hospital in Windhoek. If you become seriously ill, you may be transported to South Africa or back the United States for further treatment.


Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues

Main article: Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Namibia

In Namibia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Namibia.

Outside of Namibia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Namibia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

  • Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
  • Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
  • Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities


Frequently Asked Questions

Namibia
2008 Volunteer Survey Results

How personally rewarding is your overall Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H1r::44|}}
Score:
2008 H1s::71.3|}}
Today would you make the same decision to join the Peace Corps?|}} Rank:
2008 H2r::37|}}
Score:
2008 H2s::83.3|}}
Would you recommend Peace Corps service to others you think are qualified?|}} Rank:
2008 H3r::54|}}
Score:
2008 H3s::80.6|}}
Do you intend to complete your Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H4r::9|}}
Score:
2008 H4s::111.5|}}
How well do your Peace Corps experiences match the expectations you had before you became a Volunteer?|}} Rank:
2008 H5r::42|}}
Score:
2008 H5s::52|}}
Would your host country benefit the most if the Peace Corps program were---?|}} Rank:
2008 H6r::38|}}
Score:
2008 H6s::81.7|}}
2008BVS::Namibia


Main article: FAQs about Peace Corps in Namibia

  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Namibia?
  • What is the electric current in Namibia?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for Namibian friends and my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home from Namibia?
  • Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
  • Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?


Packing List

Main article: Packing List for Namibia

This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Namibia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, because of Namibia’s proximity to South Africa, you can get almost everything you need in Namibia at prices comparable to those in the United States.

  • General Clothing
  • Shoes
  • Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
  • Kitchen
  • Miscellaneous
  • Things we shouldn’t have brought

Peace Corps News

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22namibia%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Saturday October 1, 2016 )<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/wa/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

Country Fund

Contributions to the Namibia Country Fund will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Namibia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.

See also

External links