Difference between pages "Packing list for China" and "Training in Ecuador"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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{{Training_by_country}}
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The 10-week training period is a time for you and the Peace Corps to reexamine your commitment to being a Volunteer in Ecuador. Participation in training does not guarantee that you will become a Volunteer. While we fully expect you to successfully complete training, there are certain goals you must achieve before you can be sworn in as a Volunteer.  These goals include attaining a minimum level of ability in the Spanish language (as measured by a standard oral exam), gaining the required technical knowledge, and demonstrating your ability to live and work within the framework of the local culture (as assessed by staff members), while following Peace Corps’ guidance for safety and security and personal health.  These goals are equally important. Not only must you be able to do your job, but you must be able to do it in a culturally acceptable way. You will be evaluated and advised by both American and Ecuadorian members of the training staff regarding your progress.
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[China]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally.  You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in China.  
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Throughout pre-service training, you will be encouraged to continue examining your personal motivation for having joined the Peace Corps and your level of commitment, so that by the time you are invited to swear in as a Volunteer, you are making an informed and serious commitment that will sustain you through the full two years of service.  
  
===General Clothing===
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Ninety percent of training takes place in a community setting, where you will experience living and working conditions similar to those at the site where you will be assigned. During this community-based training period, you will live with an Ecuadorian family and be expected to take full advantage of the opportunity to immerse yourself in the language and culture. Three to five trainees are assigned to each community.
  
* SmartWool socks
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====Technical Training====
* Good cotton underwear
 
* Two-three pairs of khakis and two pairs of comfortable pants for leisure and travel (one pair of jeans and one pair of pants with zip off legs)
 
* Four to six business casual shirts (men should have at least one shirt with a collar that can be worn with a tie)
 
* One dressy outfit (a sport coat and a tie for men, a dress/skirt for women)
 
* A good raincoat (a light raincoat, since it rains more in the summer)
 
* Two pairs of long underwear (light/medium)
 
* Winter coat, gloves, hat, and scarf
 
* One or two heavy wool sweaters
 
* Two to four long-sleeved shirts for layering
 
* Shorts for sports/leisure 
 
* Two to four casual shirts for travel/leisure shirts with a little spandex are great since your clothes will stretch out)
 
* Pantyhose or tights (thick cotton or wool tights are important if you plan to wear skirts or dresses in the winter)
 
* Easy-care skirts (not too short, at least knee-length), and maybe a wool skirt for winter
 
* One or two short-sleeved or sleeveless dresses (no spaghetti straps) for summer Shoes
 
  
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Technical training will prepare you to work in Ecuador by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. The Peace Corps staff, Ecuadorian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.
  
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Technical training will include sessions on the economic and political environment in Ecuador and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Ecuadorian agencies, organizations, and community contacts that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.
  
Note that good shoes are available in China but only in smaller sizes (up to size 8 for women and up to size 9 for men).
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====Language Training====
  
* One pair of sneakers (brand names are available locally but American prices)
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As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance—they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer. Language training occurs primarily in communities, through interacting with families, community members, and agencies. Along with formal language sessions, language training is also integrated in health, safety, cultural, and technical training activities. High intermediate or advanced speakers are expected to identify alternative learning opportunities in their communities that focus on needs in their future sites. Advanced speakers are expected to structure their own learning with facilitators to help process activities.  
* One pair of teaching shoes (sturdy, comfortable, warm for winter)
 
* One pair of sturdy sandals (leather is recommended) to wear in the warm season
 
* One pair of waterproof hiking boots
 
* One pair of dress shoes
 
* One pair of “kick-around” shoes.  
 
 
Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 
  
* Deodorant (can be difficult to find in China)
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Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to formal language learning, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies once you are at your site.
* A three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take (to have while the medical office orders your medication)
 
* Contact lens solutions (available locally; note that the Peace Corps does not recommend wearing contact lenses, but most Volunteers who choose to have been able to wear them. You should still bring two pairs of glasses)
 
* Any special makeup, facial soaps, or lotions you might want
 
* Tampons (hard to find in-country)
 
*      Tide Sticks (one or two)
 
  
===Kitchen===
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====Cross-Cultural Training====
  
Most cooking supplies are available in-country, including eating and cooking utensils.  
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As part of your pre-service training, you will live with an Ecuadorian host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Ecuador. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.  
  
* Spices: basil, thyme, sage, or other Western seasonings you use (can be purchased in Chengdu, but are nice to bring if you have favorites)
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Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as gender and development, positive community development strategies, and nonformal and adult education strategies.
* A coffeemaker if you drink coffee (available locally but American prices); a French press is a good alternative and can be bought in Chengdu and at some other sites
 
* Baking pans and measuring cups (if you love to bake and want to buy a toaster oven in chengdu—or maybe a former Volunteer left you one—you might need some supplies!)
 
 
===Miscellaneous ===
 
  
* Locks for travel and to keep valuables secure in your residence
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====Health Training====
* Money belt or neck pouch
 
* Sleeping bag that packs small for travel/warmth in winter
 
* Swiss army knife or Leatherman tool
 
* Watch (durable, water-resistant)
 
* Camera, filters, and extra lens cap; batteries are available locally but may be difficult to find
 
* Small gifts such as stickers, stamps, coins, maps, key chains, etc.
 
* Headlamp (great for travel and working in the dark when you need both hands) 
 
* Duct tape
 
* Musical instruments if you play (also available locally at fairly reasonable prices)
 
* Stain stick for laundry (your clothes will get filthy so bring a few)
 
* Earplugs (for the loud 6 a.m. wakeup call on campus)
 
* Fitted sheets and pillowcases (schools provide sheets, but they are not fitted); perhaps flannel for winter
 
* Pictures of clothing from catalogs if you plan to have clothes made
 
* Games such as Scrabble, Trivial Pursuit, Taboo, Scattergories, and chess
 
* Frisbee
 
* Lonely Planet or Rough Guide to China
 
* Mandarin Chinese phrase book
 
* Checkbook (note that checks written from your U.S.  bank account can take 40 days to clear at the local bank)
 
* Books to supplement those assigned by the college. (Also available at www.bookdepository.com with free shipping to China)
 
  
These might include:
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During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Ecuador. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living area, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.
  
* The ESL Miscellany: A Treasury of Cultural and Linguistic Information: New 21st Century by Raymond C. Clark (Pro Lingua Associates, revised edition 2004)
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=====Safety Training====
* High school history books
 
* Books about your city or area
 
* Children’s books (the pictures can be useful)
 
* Books about U.S. holidays or customs
 
* Literature anthologies
 
* General references like a world almanac
 
* A writing and grammar handbook
 
* Activity books for English conversation and environmental classes 102 
 
  
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During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
  
Note: Books are really heavy to pack. The Peace Corps Information and Resource Center (IRC) is a great resource, as well as the Book Aid International program. Many reference materials are also available online. It may be more effective to bring a flash disk with your favorite handouts and lessons, and to print those things in-country. Family and friends can also send books from home if needed.
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Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
  
* Pictures or slides of your family, hometown, and “typical” America (supermarkets, schools, street scenes, historical sites, weddings and other celebrations)
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In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually four training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
* World atlas and maps of the world, United States, your state, etc.
 
* Restaurant menus, job application forms, sales announcements, product catalogs, college brochures, recycling handouts, and sightseeing brochures to use in classes
 
* A key chain with a small flashlight attached
 
* Copies of your diploma and teaching certificates (universities may ask for these)
 
* Calendar (hard to find here)
 
* Picture frames (also hard to find; if you like frames for your family pictures, etc., bring some)
 
* Documents from home (if you are considering a future move such as graduate school, etc. It will make your life much easier if you bring certain documents or copies from home [e.g., GRE scores, an unofficial transcript]; if you own a house and are renting, bring a copy of your lease, and if you may sell your house, pack a copy of deed information)
 
* Laptop
 
* iPod or mp3 player, CDs, speakers
 
* Contact information for former employers, references, schools, election office (to request an absentee ballot), bank
 
* Hard and electronic copies of resume
 
* Checkbook and ATM card tied to account
 
* Credit card
 
* Power of attorney
 
  
You may consider having some things, like heavy and bulky winter clothing, sent to you after you have arrived at your site, or you may consider bringing funds to purchase clothing (depending on your size). The key is to bring what you love and don’t bring too much!
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* Reconnect conference: Four to five months after beginning service, Volunteers get together for a two- or three-day program in which they review their first few months of service, provide input to Peace Corps/Ecuador, and learn new technical and language skills. 
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* In-service trainings: These provide an opportunity for Volunteers and their counterparts to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences.
 +
* Local technical training: Provides cross-sector training opportunities, depending on community interest, coordinated with the regional Volunteer coordinators.
 +
* Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service, reviews their respective projects and personal experiences, and provides a forum for Peace Corps/Ecuador to discuss Volunteers’ ideas for improving the program in Ecuador.  The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
  
Also See:[[Packing List from China Volunteers Perspective]]
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[[Category:Ecuador]]
 
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[[Category:Training|Ecuador]]
[[Category:China]]
 

Revision as of 21:50, 12 March 2009


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Ecuador| |4}}]]

The 10-week training period is a time for you and the Peace Corps to reexamine your commitment to being a Volunteer in Ecuador. Participation in training does not guarantee that you will become a Volunteer. While we fully expect you to successfully complete training, there are certain goals you must achieve before you can be sworn in as a Volunteer. These goals include attaining a minimum level of ability in the Spanish language (as measured by a standard oral exam), gaining the required technical knowledge, and demonstrating your ability to live and work within the framework of the local culture (as assessed by staff members), while following Peace Corps’ guidance for safety and security and personal health. These goals are equally important. Not only must you be able to do your job, but you must be able to do it in a culturally acceptable way. You will be evaluated and advised by both American and Ecuadorian members of the training staff regarding your progress.

Throughout pre-service training, you will be encouraged to continue examining your personal motivation for having joined the Peace Corps and your level of commitment, so that by the time you are invited to swear in as a Volunteer, you are making an informed and serious commitment that will sustain you through the full two years of service.

Ninety percent of training takes place in a community setting, where you will experience living and working conditions similar to those at the site where you will be assigned. During this community-based training period, you will live with an Ecuadorian family and be expected to take full advantage of the opportunity to immerse yourself in the language and culture. Three to five trainees are assigned to each community.

Technical Training

Technical training will prepare you to work in Ecuador by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. The Peace Corps staff, Ecuadorian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the economic and political environment in Ecuador and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Ecuadorian agencies, organizations, and community contacts that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.

Language Training

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance—they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer. Language training occurs primarily in communities, through interacting with families, community members, and agencies. Along with formal language sessions, language training is also integrated in health, safety, cultural, and technical training activities. High intermediate or advanced speakers are expected to identify alternative learning opportunities in their communities that focus on needs in their future sites. Advanced speakers are expected to structure their own learning with facilitators to help process activities.

Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to formal language learning, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies once you are at your site.

Cross-Cultural Training

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with an Ecuadorian host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Ecuador. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.

Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as gender and development, positive community development strategies, and nonformal and adult education strategies.

Health Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Ecuador. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living area, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other STDs are also covered.

=Safety Training

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually four training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:

  • Reconnect conference: Four to five months after beginning service, Volunteers get together for a two- or three-day program in which they review their first few months of service, provide input to Peace Corps/Ecuador, and learn new technical and language skills.
  • In-service trainings: These provide an opportunity for Volunteers and their counterparts to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences.
  • Local technical training: Provides cross-sector training opportunities, depending on community interest, coordinated with the regional Volunteer coordinators.
  • Close of service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service, reviews their respective projects and personal experiences, and provides a forum for Peace Corps/Ecuador to discuss Volunteers’ ideas for improving the program in Ecuador. The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.