Difference between pages "FAQs about Peace Corps in Uganda" and "History of the Peace Corps in Samoa"

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{{FAQs by country}}
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{{History of the Peace Corps by country}}
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In 1967, after experiencing a difficult year and a devastating cyclone, Samoa invited the Peace Corps. The first Volunteers worked in rural villages, leading health and hygiene projects for Samoa's Department of Health. These early Volunteers remain well-known for the introduction of water seal toilets, now affectionately called fale Pisikoa (Peace Corps houses).
  
 +
The next groups to follow were civil engineers, architects, accountants, statisticians, and economic planners who served in various central government departments. One early Volunteer was the architect and construction supervisor for the present Parliament building at Mulinu’u and the supporting offices of the Legislative Assembly.
  
 +
Volunteers also had a significant impact on infrastructure development, such as the Faleolo International Airport terminal and school buildings. Some took up prominent, executive positions in various government departments, such as acting directors of Public Works.
  
 +
In health care, Volunteers have served as researchers in filariasis control (filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a blood nematode), and they have worked at the National Hospital as nutrition educators and dietitians. Other Volunteers have worked as small business advisors and as youth development workers.
  
===How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Uganda? ===
+
While Volunteers have served in most sectors and departments during the 40-year history of the Peace Corps in Samoa, the largest numbers have served in the Department of Education as classroom teachers and advisors. Peace Corps Volunteers have taught and been involved in educating tens of thousands of Samoan children. They have helped build the capacity of local teachers by serving in classrooms for two years, allowing Samoan teachers to attend the National University of Samoa full-time, enhancing their education and teaching skills.  Volunteers have taught in a variety of subject areas, including science, business, mathematics, and computer studies. Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi and other Samoans are happy to share stories about their favorite Pisikoa who taught them in school or lived with their family. To date, more than 1,760 Volunteers have served in Samoa.
  
Most airlines have baggage size and weight limits and assess charges for transport of baggage that exceeds those limits.  The Peace Corps has its own size and weight limits and will not pay the cost of transport for baggage that exceeds these limits. The Peace Corps’ allowance is two checked pieces of luggage with combined dimensions of both pieces not to exceed 107 inches (length + width + height) and a carry-on bag with dimensions of no more than 45 inches. Checked baggage should not exceed 80 pounds total with a maximum weight of 50 pounds for any one bag.
 
  
Peace Corps Volunteers are not allowed to take pets, weapons, explosives, radio transmitters (shortwave radios are permitted), automobiles, or motorcycles to their overseas assignments. Do not pack flammable materials or liquids such as lighter fluid, cleaning solvents, hair spray, or aerosol containers. This is an important safety precaution.
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==Future of Peace Corps Programming in Samoa ==
  
===What is the electric current in Uganda? ===
+
Having worked for several decades on building the capacity of educators in Samoa and wanting to focus on other project areas, the education project was graduated in December 2003.
  
It is roughly 220 volts, 50 cycles. When the electricity is on (currently this is only every other day), it can range from 190 to 260 volts. Few Volunteers have electricity at home or at work. Batteries are available in Uganda, but C batteries may be hard to find, and AA batteries are very expensive and of poor quality.  
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In June 2001, in cooperation and partnership with the Government of Samoa, Peace Corps/Samoa began two new projects: village-based development (VBD) and capacity building (CB). The VBD project includes the Future Farmers of Samoa (FFS) program and an integrated coastal management (ICM) initiative, while the CB project includes information and communication technology (ICT), special needs education (SNE), and mentoring in technical and professional areas (MTPA). These projects remain the core of the Peace Corps’ development assistance to Samoa.  
  
===How much money should I bring? ===
+
In the VBD project, Volunteers work with rural communities to help them articulate their common vision for the future and to assist them in identifying their assets, mobilizing local resources, and accessing additional services to help them achieve their vision. As part of these efforts, Volunteers often facilitate, with their village counterparts, the design and management of small-scale projects in numerous sectors, including health, agriculture, youth, and income generation.  Volunteers with the Future Farmers of Samoa project are helping make agriculture a profession of first choice in Samoa.  ICM Volunteers work with various local organizations and communities to incorporate marine education and awareness into science classes, develop environmental projects, and assist with the monitoring and protecting marine resources.
  
Volunteers are expected to live at the same level as the people in their community. You will be given a settling-in allowance and a monthly living allowance, which should cover your expenses. Often Volunteers wish to bring additional money for vacation travel to other countries. Because credit card fraud is common, traveler’s checks may be the safest option. Note, though, that the exchange rate you will receive for your traveler’s checks will likely be lower than for cash and they may be harder to exchange than dollars. If you choose to bring extra money, bring the amount that will suit your own travel plans and needs. Due largely to rumors regarding counterfeit currency, it can be nearly impossible to exchange bills smaller than 50s, and it is best to bring more recently printed (2003 or later) bills to country.  
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ICT Volunteers work primarily in schools and sometimes in offices as teachers, teacher trainers, curriculum developers, network programmers, systems administrators, and systems analysts. SNE Volunteers build understanding and skills in the schools and communities of Samoa for students with special needs and in early childhood and inclusive education. MTPA Volunteers work with local development agencies and government ministries on strategic planning, capacity building, program design and management, and systemizing day-to-day operations.  
  
===When can I take vacation and have people visit me? ===
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In 2006, Peace Corps/Samoa updated its vision to the following:
  
Each Volunteer accrues two vacation days per month of service (excluding training). As Volunteers are considered to be “on-duty” 24 hours a day, 7 days per week, vacation days are charged at 7 days per week. In addition, leave may not be taken during training, the first three months of service, or the last three months of service, except in conjunction with an authorized emergency leave. Family and friends are welcome to visit you after pre-service training and the first three months of service as long as their stay does not interfere with your work. If their stay does interfere with your work, you will be required to count these days as vacation days used. Extended stays at your site are not encouraged and require permission from the country director. The Peace Corps cannot provide your visitors with visa, medical, or travel assistance.  
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A dynamic community service-focused post, working in partnership with Samoa to achieve its vision by identifying and initiating new, enhancing current, and graduating sustainable programs, through the support of well-trained, safety-oriented, adaptable Volunteers in meaningful assignments committed to building understanding and capacity.
  
===Will my belongings be covered by insurance? ===
 
  
The Peace Corps does not provide insurance coverage for personal effects; Volunteers are ultimately responsible for the safekeeping of their personal belongings. However, you can purchase personal property insurance before you leave.  If you wish, you may contact your own insurance company; additionally, insurance application forms will be provided, and we encourage you to consider them carefully. You should not ship or take items overseas that you are not prepared to lose. Jewelry, watches, radios, cameras, computers, and expensive appliances are subject to loss, theft, and breakage, and in many places, satisfactory maintenance and repair services are not available.
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==Assignment History==
  
===Do I need an international driver’s license? ===
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{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
 +
|-
 +
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="9" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
 +
| [[Ag Economics]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Education]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1994]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ag Extension]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Animal Husband]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Animal Husband Lg]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Apiculture]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Crop Extension]]
 +
| [[1967]]
 +
| [[2005]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Marine]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Soil Science]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="7" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
 +
| [[Accounting]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2001]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Advising]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Business Development]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Computer Science]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Cooperatives]]
 +
| [[1971]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[NGO Advising]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Urban and Regional Planning]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
| [[2000]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
 +
| [[Crisis Corps]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="16" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
 +
| [[Art Education]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2006]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
| [[1996]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Fisheries Fresh]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Gen. Construction]]
 +
| [[2004]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Economics]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Industrial Arts]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Library Science]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Phys. Ed/Youth Wk]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
| [[1984]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2006]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Science Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1987]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2005]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[2005]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Special Ed/Gen.]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Voc. Trainer]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1992]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Environment]]'''
 +
| [[Comm Forestry Ext]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
| [[1988]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Environmental Ed.]]
 +
| [[1979]]
 +
| [[2002]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Forestry]]
 +
| [[1982]]
 +
| [[1998]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Protected Areas Management]]
 +
| [[1999]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="8" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
 +
| [[Disease Control]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Envir. and Water Resource]]
 +
| [[1975]]
 +
| [[2006]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Degreed]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[2003]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Health Extension]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Home Econ/Ext.]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Hygiene Ed/Sanitation]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Med. Technician]]
 +
| [[1980]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Physical Therapy]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Other]]'''
 +
| [[Flexible App]]
 +
| [[1975]]
 +
| [[1983]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Unique Skill]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
 +
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
 +
| [[1976]]
 +
| [[2001]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
 +
| [[Appropriate Tech.]]
 +
| [[1981]]
 +
| [[1986]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
 +
| [[1978]]
 +
| [[2004]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Mechanics]]
 +
| [[1985]]
 +
| [[1993]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Youth Development]]
 +
| [[1997]]
 +
| [[2005]]
 +
|-
 +
|}
  
Volunteers in Uganda do not need to get an international driver’s license because they are prohibited from operating privately-owned motorized vehicles. Most urban travel is by bus or taxi. Rural travel ranges from buses and minibuses to trucks and lots of walking. If you plan to drive a rental vehicle when you take vacation, you may need an international driver’s license, so you should bring your U.S. driver’s license.
 
  
===What should I bring as gifts for Ugandan friends and my host family? ===
+
[[Category:Samoa]]
 
+
This is not a requirement; a token of friendship is sufficient. Some gift suggestions include knickknacks for the house; pictures, books, or calendars of American scenes; souvenirs from your part of the U.S.; nice soap; hard candies that will not melt or spoil; or photos to give away.
+
 
+
===Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be? ===
+
 
+
Trainees are not assigned to individual sites until approximately the eighth week of pre-service training. This gives Peace Corps staff the opportunity to assess each trainee’s technical and language skills prior to assigning sites, in addition to finalizing site selections with the Ugandan government and community counterparts. You will have an opportunity to provide input on your site preferences, including geographical location, distance from other Volunteers, and living conditions. However, many factors influence the site selection process and the Peace Corps will not guarantee placement where you would ideally like to be. Volunteers normally live in small towns or in rural villages and usually are within three hours from another Volunteer. Some sites require an eight-hour drive to reach Kampala.
+
 
+
===How can my family contact me in an emergency? ===
+
 
+
The Peace Corps’ Office of Special Services provides assistance in handling emergencies affecting trainees and Volunteers or their families. Before leaving the United States, instruct your family to notify the Office of Special Services immediately if an emergency arises, such as a serious illness or death of a family member. During normal business hours, the number for the Office of Special Services is 800.424.8580, extension 1470. After normal business hours and on weekends and holidays, the Special Services duty officer can be reached at 202.638.2574. For nonemergency questions, your family can get information from the country desk staff at the Peace Corps by calling 800.424.8580.
+
 
+
===Can I call home from Uganda? ===
+
 
+
Yes, most volunteers have cell phones although cell service quality ranges. Calls from Uganda to the United States can be very expensive but has become cheaper over the years. We recommend setting up periodic calls from home on special occasions. Prepaid phone cards from the United States do not work in Uganda. Some volunteers will have access to internet via a USB dongle or smart sim card and can use the internet to communicate with friends and family at home. Other volunteers will travel to their closest internet cafe to access internet. Volunteers sending mail should expect at least 2 weeks for their letters to reach the US and at least 2-3 months (or significantly longer) to receive packages from the US.
+
 
+
Often volunteers are able to take advantage of deals and promotions from the local cellphone service providers that may offer lower rates to call home.  For instance, Orange currently offers 45 minutes of talk time to the US for 5,000 Ugx or about $1.50. MTN offers a similar but slightly more expensive option to call the US as well.
+
 
+
===Should I bring a cellular phone with me? ===
+
 
+
In general this is not recommended. The systems in Uganda are different from those typically used in the United States, the costs of service are very high, and the coverage area is limited. Most Volunteers have chosen to purchase cellphones in Uganda after finding out the extent of coverage at their sites. However, should you chose to bring a cell phone, you should make sure that the cell phone is unlocked, accepts a sim card, and can be used abroad. Smart phones can be expensive in Uganda.
+
 
+
===Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer? ===
+
 
+
There are Internet cafes in most, although not all, larger cities throughout Uganda. Most Volunteers can expect to access such cafes once every two to three months. We do not recommend bringing a computer, as few Volunteer sites have electricity, power surges are common where there is electricity, and maintenance and repair options are very limited. Also, because of the high value of computers, owners significantly increase their risk of becoming victims of crime. If you do bring a computer, it will be at your own risk and expense.
+
 
+
This said, there are many volunteers with laptops in Uganda. Also, while internet cafes are rare in small towns, you can sign up for your own internet connection with most phone companies in Uganda. The fees are $30-$45 a month (this is a lot here, but can be worth it) and you will need to have an internet modem. You can buy an internet modem in Uganda, but they will be cheaper in the US. Just make sure you're getting one that is compatible. Also, the internet modems use a smart sim card. These sim cards can be inserted into smart phones for internet access.
+
 
+
[[Category:Uganda]]
+

Latest revision as of 12:55, 8 December 2015

Country Resources

In 1967, after experiencing a difficult year and a devastating cyclone, Samoa invited the Peace Corps. The first Volunteers worked in rural villages, leading health and hygiene projects for Samoa's Department of Health. These early Volunteers remain well-known for the introduction of water seal toilets, now affectionately called fale Pisikoa (Peace Corps houses).

The next groups to follow were civil engineers, architects, accountants, statisticians, and economic planners who served in various central government departments. One early Volunteer was the architect and construction supervisor for the present Parliament building at Mulinu’u and the supporting offices of the Legislative Assembly.

Volunteers also had a significant impact on infrastructure development, such as the Faleolo International Airport terminal and school buildings. Some took up prominent, executive positions in various government departments, such as acting directors of Public Works.

In health care, Volunteers have served as researchers in filariasis control (filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a blood nematode), and they have worked at the National Hospital as nutrition educators and dietitians. Other Volunteers have worked as small business advisors and as youth development workers.

While Volunteers have served in most sectors and departments during the 40-year history of the Peace Corps in Samoa, the largest numbers have served in the Department of Education as classroom teachers and advisors. Peace Corps Volunteers have taught and been involved in educating tens of thousands of Samoan children. They have helped build the capacity of local teachers by serving in classrooms for two years, allowing Samoan teachers to attend the National University of Samoa full-time, enhancing their education and teaching skills. Volunteers have taught in a variety of subject areas, including science, business, mathematics, and computer studies. Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi and other Samoans are happy to share stories about their favorite Pisikoa who taught them in school or lived with their family. To date, more than 1,760 Volunteers have served in Samoa.


Future of Peace Corps Programming in Samoa[edit]

Having worked for several decades on building the capacity of educators in Samoa and wanting to focus on other project areas, the education project was graduated in December 2003.

In June 2001, in cooperation and partnership with the Government of Samoa, Peace Corps/Samoa began two new projects: village-based development (VBD) and capacity building (CB). The VBD project includes the Future Farmers of Samoa (FFS) program and an integrated coastal management (ICM) initiative, while the CB project includes information and communication technology (ICT), special needs education (SNE), and mentoring in technical and professional areas (MTPA). These projects remain the core of the Peace Corps’ development assistance to Samoa.

In the VBD project, Volunteers work with rural communities to help them articulate their common vision for the future and to assist them in identifying their assets, mobilizing local resources, and accessing additional services to help them achieve their vision. As part of these efforts, Volunteers often facilitate, with their village counterparts, the design and management of small-scale projects in numerous sectors, including health, agriculture, youth, and income generation. Volunteers with the Future Farmers of Samoa project are helping make agriculture a profession of first choice in Samoa. ICM Volunteers work with various local organizations and communities to incorporate marine education and awareness into science classes, develop environmental projects, and assist with the monitoring and protecting marine resources.

ICT Volunteers work primarily in schools and sometimes in offices as teachers, teacher trainers, curriculum developers, network programmers, systems administrators, and systems analysts. SNE Volunteers build understanding and skills in the schools and communities of Samoa for students with special needs and in early childhood and inclusive education. MTPA Volunteers work with local development agencies and government ministries on strategic planning, capacity building, program design and management, and systemizing day-to-day operations.

In 2006, Peace Corps/Samoa updated its vision to the following:

A dynamic community service-focused post, working in partnership with Samoa to achieve its vision by identifying and initiating new, enhancing current, and graduating sustainable programs, through the support of well-trained, safety-oriented, adaptable Volunteers in meaningful assignments committed to building understanding and capacity.


Assignment History[edit]

Sector Assignment Beg. Yr End. Yr
Agriculture Ag Economics 1982 2007
Ag Education 1982 1994
Ag Extension 1981 2007
Animal Husband 1976 1996
Animal Husband Lg 1980 1981
Apiculture 1984 1984
Crop Extension 1967 2005
Fisheries Marine 1981 1985
Soil Science 1982 1986
Business Accounting 1979 2001
Business Advising 1986 2007
Business Development 1999 1999
Computer Science 1996 2007
Cooperatives 1971 1999
NGO Advising 2000 2007
Urban and Regional Planning 2000 2000
Crisis Corps Crisis Corps 1992 1992
Education Art Education 1983 1998
Bus. Ed/Sectl Skl 1978 1986
English Teacher 1979 2006
English Teacher Trainer 1988 1996
Fisheries Fresh 1985 1985
Gen. Construction 2004 2007
Home Economics 1983 1997
Industrial Arts 1976 1997
Library Science 1978 1978
Phys. Ed/Youth Wk 1984 1984
Prim-Ed/Teach Trn 1981 2006
Science Ed/Gen. 1980 1987
Secondary-Ed Math 1981 2005
Secondary-Ed Sci. 1978 2005
Special Ed/Gen. 1982 2007
Voc. Trainer 1981 1992
Environment Comm Forestry Ext 1988 1988
Environmental Ed. 1979 2002
Forestry 1982 1998
Protected Areas Management 1999 2007
Health Disease Control 1981 1981
Envir. and Water Resource 1975 2006
Health Degreed 1980 2003
Health Extension 1983 2007
Home Econ/Ext. 1983 1986
Hygiene Ed/Sanitation 1981 2007
Med. Technician 1980 1981
Physical Therapy 1985 1985
Other Flexible App 1975 1983
Unique Skill 1978 2007
UNV United Nations Volunteer 1976 2001
Youth and Community Development Appropriate Tech. 1981 1986
Commun. Serv/Deg. 1978 2004
Mechanics 1985 1993
Youth Development 1997 2005