Difference between pages "FAQs about Peace Corps in Ecuador" and "Community Rabbit-Rearing Project"

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{{FAQs by country}}
+
{{Project
 +
|project=Community Rabbit-Rearing Project
 +
|projecttype=SPA
 +
|region=Northern
 +
|country=Ghana
 +
|firstname=PCV
 +
|lastname=Davidson
 +
|state=Kentucky
 +
|communityfunds=GHC
 +
|requestedfunds=GHC
 +
|neededfunds=GHC
 +
|projectyear=2010
 +
}}
 +
===Title===
 +
Community Rabbit-Rearing Project
  
 +
===Purpose and Approach===
 +
With global climate change affecting the farming seasons and production of crops, it is very difficult for farming communities to depend solely on their harvest of goods for sustenance and additional income. Because their family farms are not as profitable as in the past, many of the Bagurugu community members are looking for outside sources of providing for their homes.  They, however, are lacking severely in business skills needed for expanding any sort of operation above the informal level. 
  
 +
The intention of the project is two-fold: to increase the general income of the participating members, but more importantly, to better equip the participants to expand their business of rabbit rearing and/or move on to other projects in which they can transfer the knowledge gained during this experience.
  
 +
Younger members of the community are the target group for this project, as they are less likely to have commitments to family members and any work outside the main family farm.  They are also extremely open to new and unproven business ventures.  The youth that have been chosen to participate are ones with an expressed interest of a future in business and they are willing to invest their time and efforts into raising rabbits as a means of income generation.  They are also able to see their participation in this project as a means of gaining useful knowledge they hope to soon practice as they enter the workforce.
  
===How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Ecuador?===
 
  
Most airlines have baggage size and weight limits and assess charges for transport of baggage that exceeds those limits. The Peace Corps has its own size and weight limits and will not pay the cost of transport for baggage that exceeds these limits. The Peace Corps’ allowance is two checked pieces of luggage and a carry-on bag with dimensions of no more than 45 inches (length + width + height). The larger piece of checked luggage may not exceed 62 inches, and both pieces together may not exceed 107 inches. Checked baggage should not exceed 80 pounds total with a maximum weight of 50 pounds for any one bag. Keep in mind that with the exception of the initial trip to the training site, you will be responsible for transporting your luggage around Ecuador.  
+
===Objective===
 +
#Increase the awareness of basic business principles to community youth.
 +
##Teach the participants to keep accurate records including (but not limited to): animal births & deaths, sales records, receipts and future budgets based on profit projections
 +
#Increase and sustain the desire for means of alternative livelihood among all community members.
 +
##To be 'successful' in the rabbit venture so that other community members might see the profits and be more willing to fund their own ventures into alternative livelihood practices.
  
Peace Corps Volunteers are not allowed to take pets, weapons, explosives, radio transmitters (shortwave radios are permitted), automobiles, or motorcycles to their overseas assignments. Do not pack flammable materials or liquids such as lighter fluid, cleaning solvents, hair spray, or aerosol containers. This is an important safety precaution.  
+
===Action Plan===
 +
The project will commence with a small informational session provided by a representative from the Ministry of Agriculture (Tamale).  He will give the participants basic information on rabbit rearing and the management of the animals.  During this phase, a carpenter will be working on ten hutches (three separate compartments).  Once the hutches are complete, each participant will take one to his or her house where they will be given a buck and a doe rabbit that will immediately begin mating.  After the offspring are born, the participants will keep accurate and detailed records of their births and deaths as well as their sale or consumption by the family. The participants are also expected to donate at least one male and one female rabbit in the future to other community members interested in starting their own business.
  
===What is the electric current in Ecuador?===
+
#Capacity-building meeting with a representative from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture.
 +
#Purchase hutch building materials.
 +
#Construction of the hutches.
 +
#Introduction of rabbits to hutches and conjugal visits (the mating of rabbits).
 +
#Training on record keeping and sale of rabbits.
  
The current is 110 volts, 60 cycles, the same as in the United States. Some towns, however, do not have electricity.
+
===Budget===
  
===How much money should I bring?===
+
Currency Exchange Rate: 1.41 Ghana Cedis = 1.00 US Dollars
  
Volunteers are expected to live at the same level as the people in their community. They are given a settling-in allowance and a monthly living allowance, which should cover their expenses. Often Volunteers wish to bring additional money for vacation travel to other countries. Credit cards and traveler’s checks are preferable to cash. ATMs are widely available in larger towns and cities.  
+
{| border="1"
 +
|+ '''Community Contribution'''
 +
|-
 +
! Material
 +
! Quantity
 +
! Unit Cost (Cedi)
 +
! Total Cost (Cedi)
 +
! Total Cost (USD)
 +
|-
 +
|Workshop food and drink
 +
| align="center" | 13 people
 +
| align="center" |1.5
 +
| align="center" |  19.50
 +
| align="center" | 13.83
 +
|-
 +
|Material storage
 +
| align="center" | 4 days
 +
| align="center" |10
 +
| align="center" |  40
 +
| align="center" | 28.37
 +
|-
 +
|Speaking fee for Ministry of Food and Agriculture representative
 +
| align="center" | 1
 +
| align="center" |35
 +
| align="center" |  35
 +
| align="center" | 24.82
 +
|-
 +
|Construction labor of hutches (non-carpentry)
 +
| align="center" | 40 hours
 +
| align="center" |1.50/hour
 +
| align="center" |  60
 +
| align="center" | 42.55
 +
|-
 +
|Transportation of hutches from building site to community
 +
| align="center" | 10 trips
 +
| align="center" |3
 +
| align="center" |  30
 +
| align="center" | 21.28
 +
|-
 +
|Food and water for laborers
 +
| align="center" | 60 people
 +
| align="center" |1
 +
| align="center" |  60
 +
| align="center" | 42.55
 +
|-
 +
|Baby litter boxes
 +
| align="center" |20
 +
| align="center" |1
 +
| align="center" |  20
 +
| align="center" | 14.18
 +
|-
 +
|Project notebooks
 +
| align="center" | 10
 +
| align="center" |2.50
 +
| align="center" |  25
 +
| align="center" | 17.73
 +
|-
 +
|Transport of rabbits from purchase site to community
 +
| align="center" | 10 litters
 +
| align="center" |6
 +
| align="center" |  60
 +
| align="center" | 42.55
 +
|-
 +
|'''Total'''
 +
|
 +
|
 +
| align="center" | '''349.50'''
 +
| align="center" | '''247.86'''
 +
|}
  
===When can I take vacation and have people visit me?===
 
  
Each Volunteer accrues two vacation days per month of service (excluding training). Leave may not be taken during training, the first three months of service, or the last three months of service, except in special situations that have been approved by the country director. Family and friends are welcome to visit you after pre-service training and the first three months of service as long as their stay does not interfere with your work. Extended stays at your site are not encouraged and may require permission from your country director. The Peace Corps is not able to provide your visitors with visa, medical, or travel assistance.  
+
{| border="1"
 +
|+ '''Partnership Contribution'''
 +
|-
 +
! Material
 +
! Quantity
 +
! Unit Cost (Cedi)
 +
! Total Cost (Cedi)
 +
! Total Cost (USD)
 +
|-
 +
|1" x 3" x 15' timber
 +
| align="center" |130 planks
 +
| align="center" |3
 +
| align="center" |  390
 +
| align="center" | 276.60
 +
|-
 +
|Aluminum sheets
 +
| align="center" | 15
 +
| align="center" |7
 +
| align="center" |  105
 +
| align="center" | 74.47
 +
|-
 +
|Chicken wire
 +
| align="center" | 23 square yards
 +
| align="center" |2.50
 +
| align="center" |  57.50
 +
| align="center" | 40.78
 +
|-
 +
|1.5" nails
 +
| align="center" | 7 pounds
 +
| align="center" |1
 +
| align="center" |  7
 +
| align="center" | 4.96
 +
|-
 +
|Lock latches
 +
| align="center" | 30
 +
| align="center" |0.70
 +
| align="center" |  21
 +
| align="center" | 14.89
 +
|-
 +
|Hinges
 +
| align="center" | 30 pairs
 +
| align="center" |1
 +
| align="center" |  30
 +
| align="center" | 21.28
 +
|-
 +
|Padlocks
 +
| align="center" | 30
 +
| align="center" |1
 +
| align="center" |  30
 +
| align="center" | 21.28
 +
|-
 +
|Rabbits
 +
| align="center" | 20
 +
| align="center" |10
 +
| align="center" |  200
 +
| align="center" | 141.84
 +
|-
 +
|Transportation of materials (from timber yard to community)
 +
| align="center" | 1 trip
 +
| align="center" |34
 +
| align="center" |  34
 +
| align="center" | 24.11
 +
|-
 +
|Construction of hutches
 +
| align="center" | 10
 +
| align="center" |15
 +
| align="center" |  150
 +
| align="center" | 106.38
 +
|-
 +
|'''Total'''
 +
|
 +
|
 +
| align="center" | '''1,024.50'''
 +
| align="center" | '''726.59'''
 +
|}
  
===Will my belongings be covered by insurance?===
 
  
The Peace Corps does not provide insurance coverage for personal effects; Volunteers are ultimately responsible for the safekeeping of their personal belongings. However, you can purchase personal property insurance before you leave. If you wish, you may contact your own insurance company; additionally, insurance application forms will be provided and we encourage you to consider them carefully. Volunteers should not ship or take valuable items overseas. Jewelry, watches, radios, cameras, and expensive appliances are subject to loss, theft, and breakage, and in many places, satisfactory maintenance and repair services are not available.  
+
{| border="1"
 +
|+ '''Total Project Cost'''
 +
|-
 +
!
 +
! % Contribution
 +
! Total Cost (Cedi)
 +
! Total Cost (USD)
 +
|-
 +
| Community Contribution
 +
| align="center" |25
 +
| align="center" |349.50
 +
| align="center" |247.86
 +
|-
 +
| Partnership Contribution
 +
| align="center" |75
 +
| align="center" |1,024.50
 +
| align="center" |726.59
 +
|-
 +
|'''Total Project Cost'''
 +
|
 +
|align="center" |'''1,374'''
 +
|align="center" |'''974.45'''
 +
|}
  
===Do I need an international driver’s license?===
+
===Additional PC Resources===
 +
Rabbit-rearing Manual (IRC library)
  
Volunteers in Ecuador do not need to get an international driver’s license because they are prohibited from operating motorized vehicles. Most urban travel is by bus or taxi. Rural travel ranges from buses and minibuses to trucks and lots of walking.
+
===Project Reflection and Sustainability===
 
+
Each of the participants will be required to keep a written record of their rabbits' births and deaths, as well as the sales and the family consumption. They will also keep a journal to track the finances with regards to the revenue and expenditure of the rabbit project. This will teach them the importance of finding a pattern and detecting connections between sales and the time of year, in addition to seeing a direct correlation between their input and the monetary gain they will be makingThe records will be checked by the PCV or the counterpart weekly, beginning with the commencement of the project.
===What should I bring as gifts for Ecuadorian friends and my host family? ===
+
 
+
This is not a requirement. A token of friendship is sufficient.  Some gift suggestions include knickknacks for the house; pictures, books, or calendars of American scenes; souvenirs from your area; hard candies that will not melt or spoil; or photos to give away.
+
 
+
===Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be? ===
+
 
+
Peace Corps staff must assess your technical and language skills and finalize site selections with your counterparts prior to making a site assignment, you will have an opportunity to provide input on your site preferences, including geographical location, distance from other Volunteers, and living conditions. Keep in mind that many factors influence the site selection process and that the Peace Corps cannot guarantee placement where you would ideally like to be. Most Volunteers live in small towns or in rural villages and usually are within two or three hours from the nearest fellow Volunteer. Some sites require a 10- to 12-hour drive from the capital.
+
 
+
===How can my family contact me in an emergency?===
+
 
+
The Peace Corps’ Office of Special Services provides assistance in handling emergencies affecting trainees and Volunteers or their families. Before leaving the United States, instruct your family to notify the Office of Special Services immediately if an emergency arises, such as a serious illness or death of a family member. During normal business hours, the number for the Office of Special Services is 800.424.8580, extension 1470. After normal business hours and on weekends and holidays, the Special Services duty officer can be reached at 202.638.2574. For nonemergency questions, your family can get information from your country desk staff at the Peace Corps by calling 800.424.8580, extensions, 2516, 2515, or 2525.
+
 
+
===Can I call home from Ecuador?===
+
 
+
Telephone service from Ecuador to the United States is generally quite good, and all of the major calling card services are available (i.e., AT&T, Sprint, and MCI). Most communities have a telephone office where you can call the United States collect or pay for the call on the spot. Very few Volunteers have phones in their homes, but many have neighbors with phones. (Note that it is not a good idea to use a neighbor’s phone with the promise to repay the phone owner later.) In larger towns internet cafes may have computers running Skype, so you may want to set up an account before coming.
+
 
+
===Should I bring a cellular phone with me?===
+
 
+
There are two major cellular phone companies in Ecuador that provide service in most of the large urban areas. While coverage is expanding, some Volunteer sites are in areas that do not have cellular service. All volunteers are required to have a cellular phone by Peace Corps Ecuador, and one will be provided during training. These phones are blocked for outgoing international calls, but can send text messages internationallyKeep in mind that cellphones are very much in demand and that theft is an issue for any Volunteer who has a cellphone.
+
 
+
===Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer? ===
+
 
+
Because it is a major tourist destination, Ecuador is well supplied with Internet cafes. In fact, there are so many of them in Quito that prices are quite low as a result of the intense competition. In addition to e-mail services, most Internet cafes offer phone call alternatives such as Net2Phone. Peace Corps/Ecuador neither recommends nor discourages bringing a computer, but it should be made clear that computers are easily stolen, so you should purchase personal property insurance if you decide to bring one.
+
 
+
[[Category:Ecuador]]
+

Revision as of 09:36, 20 December 2010


Project was named::Community Rabbit-Rearing Project{{#if:Ghana|
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Title

Community Rabbit-Rearing Project

Purpose and Approach

With global climate change affecting the farming seasons and production of crops, it is very difficult for farming communities to depend solely on their harvest of goods for sustenance and additional income. Because their family farms are not as profitable as in the past, many of the Bagurugu community members are looking for outside sources of providing for their homes. They, however, are lacking severely in business skills needed for expanding any sort of operation above the informal level.

The intention of the project is two-fold: to increase the general income of the participating members, but more importantly, to better equip the participants to expand their business of rabbit rearing and/or move on to other projects in which they can transfer the knowledge gained during this experience.

Younger members of the community are the target group for this project, as they are less likely to have commitments to family members and any work outside the main family farm. They are also extremely open to new and unproven business ventures. The youth that have been chosen to participate are ones with an expressed interest of a future in business and they are willing to invest their time and efforts into raising rabbits as a means of income generation. They are also able to see their participation in this project as a means of gaining useful knowledge they hope to soon practice as they enter the workforce.


Objective

  1. Increase the awareness of basic business principles to community youth.
    1. Teach the participants to keep accurate records including (but not limited to): animal births & deaths, sales records, receipts and future budgets based on profit projections
  2. Increase and sustain the desire for means of alternative livelihood among all community members.
    1. To be 'successful' in the rabbit venture so that other community members might see the profits and be more willing to fund their own ventures into alternative livelihood practices.

Action Plan

The project will commence with a small informational session provided by a representative from the Ministry of Agriculture (Tamale). He will give the participants basic information on rabbit rearing and the management of the animals. During this phase, a carpenter will be working on ten hutches (three separate compartments). Once the hutches are complete, each participant will take one to his or her house where they will be given a buck and a doe rabbit that will immediately begin mating. After the offspring are born, the participants will keep accurate and detailed records of their births and deaths as well as their sale or consumption by the family. The participants are also expected to donate at least one male and one female rabbit in the future to other community members interested in starting their own business.

  1. Capacity-building meeting with a representative from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture.
  2. Purchase hutch building materials.
  3. Construction of the hutches.
  4. Introduction of rabbits to hutches and conjugal visits (the mating of rabbits).
  5. Training on record keeping and sale of rabbits.

Budget

Currency Exchange Rate: 1.41 Ghana Cedis = 1.00 US Dollars

Community Contribution
Material Quantity Unit Cost (Cedi) Total Cost (Cedi) Total Cost (USD)
Workshop food and drink 13 people 1.5 19.50 13.83
Material storage 4 days 10 40 28.37
Speaking fee for Ministry of Food and Agriculture representative 1 35 35 24.82
Construction labor of hutches (non-carpentry) 40 hours 1.50/hour 60 42.55
Transportation of hutches from building site to community 10 trips 3 30 21.28
Food and water for laborers 60 people 1 60 42.55
Baby litter boxes 20 1 20 14.18
Project notebooks 10 2.50 25 17.73
Transport of rabbits from purchase site to community 10 litters 6 60 42.55
Total 349.50 247.86


Partnership Contribution
Material Quantity Unit Cost (Cedi) Total Cost (Cedi) Total Cost (USD)
1" x 3" x 15' timber 130 planks 3 390 276.60
Aluminum sheets 15 7 105 74.47
Chicken wire 23 square yards 2.50 57.50 40.78
1.5" nails 7 pounds 1 7 4.96
Lock latches 30 0.70 21 14.89
Hinges 30 pairs 1 30 21.28
Padlocks 30 1 30 21.28
Rabbits 20 10 200 141.84
Transportation of materials (from timber yard to community) 1 trip 34 34 24.11
Construction of hutches 10 15 150 106.38
Total 1,024.50 726.59


Total Project Cost
 % Contribution Total Cost (Cedi) Total Cost (USD)
Community Contribution 25 349.50 247.86
Partnership Contribution 75 1,024.50 726.59
Total Project Cost 1,374 974.45

Additional PC Resources

Rabbit-rearing Manual (IRC library)

Project Reflection and Sustainability

Each of the participants will be required to keep a written record of their rabbits' births and deaths, as well as the sales and the family consumption. They will also keep a journal to track the finances with regards to the revenue and expenditure of the rabbit project. This will teach them the importance of finding a pattern and detecting connections between sales and the time of year, in addition to seeing a direct correlation between their input and the monetary gain they will be making. The records will be checked by the PCV or the counterpart weekly, beginning with the commencement of the project.