Difference between pages "Namibia" and "FAQs about Peace Corps in Ecuador"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
+
{{FAQs by country}}
|Countryname= Namibia
+
|CountryCode = na
+
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
+
|Flag= Flag_of_Namibia.svg
+
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/nawb697.pdf
+
|Region= [[Africa]]
+
|CountryDirector= [[Gilbert Collins]]
+
|Sectors= [[Education]] <br> [[Health and HIV/AIDS]] <br> [[Information and Communications Technology]] <br> [[Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development]]
+
|ProgramDates= [[1990]] - [[Present]]
+
|CurrentlyServing= 113
+
|TotalVolunteers= 1,007
+
|Languages= [[Afrikaans]], [[Oshikwanyama]], [[Oshindonga]], [[Otjiherero]], [[Rukwangali]] [[English]], [[Oshiwambo]], [[Damara/Nama]], [[Khoekhoegowab]], [[Silozi]], [[Rumanyo]], [[Thimbukushu]], [[Subiya]]
+
|Map= Wa-map.gif
+
|stagingdate= Feb 18 2011
+
|stagingcity= Washington, DC
+
}}
+
  
Less than two decades into its independence, Namibia has emerged as a model by establishing political and economic frameworks that give it one of the freest and most open economies in Africa. Namibians are encouraged to participate fully in shaping laws and government policies. Namibia has set a model for advancing the rule of law and encouraging the growth of civil society.
 
  
The initial planning for the Peace Corps/Namibia program began in 1989, prior to
 
independence. The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived on September 9, 1990, less than
 
six months after the country achieved independence.
 
  
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
===How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Ecuador?===
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Namibia]]''
+
Most airlines have baggage size and weight limits and assess charges for transport of baggage that exceeds those limits.  The Peace Corps has its own size and weight limits and will not pay the cost of transport for baggage that exceeds these limits. The Peace Corps’ allowance is two checked pieces of luggage and a carry-on bag with dimensions of no more than 45 inches (length + width + height). The larger piece of checked luggage may not exceed 62 inches, and both pieces together may not exceed 107 inches. Checked baggage should not exceed 80 pounds total with a maximum weight of 50 pounds for any one bag. Keep in mind that with the exception of the initial trip to the training site, you will be responsible for transporting your luggage around Ecuador.
  
The first group of 14 Volunteers arrived in Namibia on September 9, 1990, less than six months after the country became independent. By January 1991, the program was in full operation. The primary role of these early Volunteers was to teach English, in support of the new government’s declaration of English as the country’s official language. Classroom teachers also assisted in the transition from Afrikaans to English as the language of instruction in upper primary and secondary schools. In the early 1990s, Volunteers also provided assistance to drought relief efforts and began to work in youth development offices. The number of Volunteers peaked in the late 1990s, reaching a high of almost 150 people. This spike was largely driven by a collaborative effort with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide school-based teacher training throughout the rural north. In August 2009, the first group of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Volunteers arrived in the country.  The new Small Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Development (SEED) program was introduced in 2010.
+
Peace Corps Volunteers are not allowed to take pets, weapons, explosives, radio transmitters (shortwave radios are permitted), automobiles, or motorcycles to their overseas assignments. Do not pack flammable materials or liquids such as lighter fluid, cleaning solvents, hair spray, or aerosol containers. This is an important safety precaution.  
  
 +
===What is the electric current in Ecuador?===
  
Today, about 140 Volunteers work as primary and secondary school teachers, community health workers, information and communications technology facilitators, and small enterprise development agents.
+
The current is 110 volts, 60 cycles, the same as in the United States. Some towns, however, do not have electricity.  
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
===How much money should I bring?===
  
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Namibia]]''
+
Volunteers are expected to live at the same level as the people in their community. They are given a settling-in allowance and a monthly living allowance, which should cover their expenses. Often Volunteers wish to bring additional money for vacation travel to other countries. Credit cards and traveler’s checks are preferable to cash. ATMs are widely available in larger towns and cities.
  
Housing varies considerably. Your site might be a Western-style cement block house, usually with electricity and running water; an apartment attached to a student boarding facility (hostel); or, in the case of more rural junior secondary schools, a room with a local family. As the government has invited assistance from a variety of sources, you may also be asked to share a two- or three-bedroom house with one or two colleagues (either Namibian or Volunteers from other countries). Our expectation is that you will have a private bedroom, but remember that there is a shortage of housing for government staff in most areas in Namibia. The minstry/ hosting agency to which you are assigned is responsible for paying your montly utilities and providing you with the basic furnishings (e.g., bed, charis, tables, stove, and gas refrigerator).
+
===When can I take vacation and have people visit me?===
  
 +
Each Volunteer accrues two vacation days per month of service (excluding training). Leave may not be taken during training, the first three months of service, or the last three months of service, except in special situations that have been approved by the country director. Family and friends are welcome to visit you after pre-service training and the first three months of service as long as their stay does not interfere with your work. Extended stays at your site are not encouraged and may require permission from your country director. The Peace Corps is not able to provide your visitors with visa, medical, or travel assistance.
  
 +
===Will my belongings be covered by insurance?===
  
==Training==
+
The Peace Corps does not provide insurance coverage for personal effects; Volunteers are ultimately responsible for the safekeeping of their personal belongings. However, you can purchase personal property insurance before you leave. If you wish, you may contact your own insurance company; additionally, insurance application forms will be provided and we encourage you to consider them carefully. Volunteers should not ship or take valuable items overseas. Jewelry, watches, radios, cameras, and expensive appliances are subject to loss, theft, and breakage, and in many places, satisfactory maintenance and repair services are not available.
  
''Main article: [[Training in Namibia]]''
+
===Do I need an international driver’s license?===
  
The eight-week training will provide you the opportunity to learn new skills and practice them as they apply to Namibia. You will receive training and orientation in language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Volunteer in Namibia.
+
Volunteers in Ecuador do not need to get an international driver’s license because they are prohibited from operating motorized vehicles. Most urban travel is by bus or taxi. Rural travel ranges from buses and minibuses to trucks and lots of walking.  
  
During the first week of training, you will stay at a central training facility. During this first week, Trainees will receive information about the types of projects and sites available and will have individual interviews with APCDs and programming staff in order to determine their tentative site placement and language assignment.  Trainees will begin language instruction in small groups (typically 3-4 students and an instructor) as well as technical, health/safety, and cross-cultural training during this time.
+
===What should I bring as gifts for Ecuadorian friends and my host family? ===
  
Trainees will also have the opportunity to meet their host families, with whom they will live for approximately 6 weeks, during the first week of training.  This homestay will help bring to life some of the topics covered in training, giving you a chance to practice your new language skills and directly observe and participate in Namibian culture.
+
This is not a requirement. A token of friendship is sufficient.  Some gift suggestions include knickknacks for the house; pictures, books, or calendars of American scenes; souvenirs from your area; hard candies that will not melt or spoil; or photos to give away.  
  
At the onset of training, the training staff will outline the competencies that you have to master before becoming a Volunteer and the criteria that will be used to assess achievement of those competencies. Evaluation of your performance during training is a continual process based on a dialogue between you and the training staff. The training manager, along with the language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers, will work with you toward the highest possible achievement of training competencies by providing you with feedback throughout training. After successful completion of pre-service training, you will be sworn in as a Volunteer and make the final preparations for departure to your site.
+
===Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be? ===
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
Peace Corps staff must assess your technical and language skills and finalize site selections with your counterparts prior to making a site assignment, you will have an opportunity to provide input on your site preferences, including geographical location, distance from other Volunteers, and living conditions. Keep in mind that many factors influence the site selection process and that the Peace Corps cannot guarantee placement where you would ideally like to be. Most Volunteers live in small towns or in rural villages and usually are within two or three hours from the nearest fellow Volunteer. Some sites require a 10- to 12-hour drive from the capital.
  
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Namibia]]''
+
===How can my family contact me in an emergency?===
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Namibia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer, who takes care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services are available at a U.S.-standard hospital in Windhoek. If you become seriously ill, you may be transported to South Africa or back the United States for further treatment.
+
The Peace Corps’ Office of Special Services provides assistance in handling emergencies affecting trainees and Volunteers or their families. Before leaving the United States, instruct your family to notify the Office of Special Services immediately if an emergency arises, such as a serious illness or death of a family member. During normal business hours, the number for the Office of Special Services is 800.424.8580, extension 1470. After normal business hours and on weekends and holidays, the Special Services duty officer can be reached at 202.638.2574. For nonemergency questions, your family can get information from your country desk staff at the Peace Corps by calling 800.424.8580, extensions, 2516, 2515, or 2525.  
  
 +
===Can I call home from Ecuador?===
  
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
Telephone service from Ecuador to the United States is generally quite good, and all of the major calling card services are available (i.e., AT&T, Sprint, and MCI). Most communities have a telephone office where you can call the United States collect or pay for the call on the spot. Very few Volunteers have phones in their homes, but many have neighbors with phones. (Note that it is not a good idea to use a neighbor’s phone with the promise to repay the phone owner later.) In larger towns internet cafes may have computers running Skype, so you may want to set up an account before coming.
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Namibia]]''
+
===Should I bring a cellular phone with me?===
  
In Namibia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Namibia.
+
There are two major cellular phone companies in Ecuador that provide service in most of the large urban areas. While coverage is expanding, some Volunteer sites are in areas that do not have cellular service. All volunteers are required to have a cellular phone by Peace Corps Ecuador, and one will be provided during training. These phones are blocked for outgoing international calls, but can send text messages internationally.  Keep in mind that cellphones are very much in demand and that theft is an issue for any Volunteer who has a cellphone.
  
Outside of Namibia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Namibia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.
+
===Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer? ===
  
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
+
Because it is a major tourist destination, Ecuador is well supplied with Internet cafes. In fact, there are so many of them in Quito that prices are quite low as a result of the intense competition. In addition to e-mail services, most Internet cafes offer phone call alternatives such as Net2Phone. Peace Corps/Ecuador neither recommends nor discourages bringing a computer, but it should be made clear that computers are easily stolen, so you should purchase personal property insurance if you decide to bring one.
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
+
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
+
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
+
  
 
+
[[Category:Ecuador]]
==Frequently Asked Questions==
+
 
+
{{Volunteersurvey2008
+
|H1r=  44
+
|H1s=  71.3
+
|H2r=  37
+
|H2s=  83.3
+
|H3r=  54
+
|H3s=  80.6
+
|H4r=  9
+
|H4s=  111.5
+
|H5r=  42
+
|H5s=  52
+
|H6r=  38
+
|H6s=  81.7
+
}}
+
 
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Namibia]]''
+
 
+
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Namibia?
+
* What is the electric current in Namibia?
+
* How much money should I bring?
+
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
+
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
+
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
+
* What should I bring as gifts for Namibian friends and my host family?
+
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
+
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
+
* Can I call home from Namibia?
+
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
+
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
+
 
+
 
+
 
+
==Packing List==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Packing List for Namibia]]''
+
 
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Namibia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, because of Namibia’s proximity to South Africa, you can get almost everything you need in Namibia at prices comparable to those in the United States.
+
 
+
* General Clothing
+
* Shoes
+
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
+
* Kitchen
+
* Miscellaneous
+
* Things we shouldn’t have brought
+
 
+
==Peace Corps News==
+
 
+
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
+
 
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22namibia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
 
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/wa/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
+
 
+
==Country Fund==
+
 
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=697-CFD Namibia Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Namibia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
 
+
==See also==
+
* [[List of resources for Namibia]]
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Namibia]]
+
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
+
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
+
 
+
==External links==
+
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/wa.html Peace Corps Journals - Namibia]
+
 
+
[[Category:Namibia]] [[Category:Africa]]
+
[[Category:Country]]
+

Latest revision as of 06:57, 21 May 2014

FAQs about Peace Corps
  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring?
  • What is the electric current?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home?
  • Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
  • Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
...and more...

For information see Welcomebooks



How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Ecuador?[edit]

Most airlines have baggage size and weight limits and assess charges for transport of baggage that exceeds those limits. The Peace Corps has its own size and weight limits and will not pay the cost of transport for baggage that exceeds these limits. The Peace Corps’ allowance is two checked pieces of luggage and a carry-on bag with dimensions of no more than 45 inches (length + width + height). The larger piece of checked luggage may not exceed 62 inches, and both pieces together may not exceed 107 inches. Checked baggage should not exceed 80 pounds total with a maximum weight of 50 pounds for any one bag. Keep in mind that with the exception of the initial trip to the training site, you will be responsible for transporting your luggage around Ecuador.

Peace Corps Volunteers are not allowed to take pets, weapons, explosives, radio transmitters (shortwave radios are permitted), automobiles, or motorcycles to their overseas assignments. Do not pack flammable materials or liquids such as lighter fluid, cleaning solvents, hair spray, or aerosol containers. This is an important safety precaution.

What is the electric current in Ecuador?[edit]

The current is 110 volts, 60 cycles, the same as in the United States. Some towns, however, do not have electricity.

How much money should I bring?[edit]

Volunteers are expected to live at the same level as the people in their community. They are given a settling-in allowance and a monthly living allowance, which should cover their expenses. Often Volunteers wish to bring additional money for vacation travel to other countries. Credit cards and traveler’s checks are preferable to cash. ATMs are widely available in larger towns and cities.

When can I take vacation and have people visit me?[edit]

Each Volunteer accrues two vacation days per month of service (excluding training). Leave may not be taken during training, the first three months of service, or the last three months of service, except in special situations that have been approved by the country director. Family and friends are welcome to visit you after pre-service training and the first three months of service as long as their stay does not interfere with your work. Extended stays at your site are not encouraged and may require permission from your country director. The Peace Corps is not able to provide your visitors with visa, medical, or travel assistance.

Will my belongings be covered by insurance?[edit]

The Peace Corps does not provide insurance coverage for personal effects; Volunteers are ultimately responsible for the safekeeping of their personal belongings. However, you can purchase personal property insurance before you leave. If you wish, you may contact your own insurance company; additionally, insurance application forms will be provided and we encourage you to consider them carefully. Volunteers should not ship or take valuable items overseas. Jewelry, watches, radios, cameras, and expensive appliances are subject to loss, theft, and breakage, and in many places, satisfactory maintenance and repair services are not available.

Do I need an international driver’s license?[edit]

Volunteers in Ecuador do not need to get an international driver’s license because they are prohibited from operating motorized vehicles. Most urban travel is by bus or taxi. Rural travel ranges from buses and minibuses to trucks and lots of walking.

What should I bring as gifts for Ecuadorian friends and my host family?[edit]

This is not a requirement. A token of friendship is sufficient. Some gift suggestions include knickknacks for the house; pictures, books, or calendars of American scenes; souvenirs from your area; hard candies that will not melt or spoil; or photos to give away.

Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?[edit]

Peace Corps staff must assess your technical and language skills and finalize site selections with your counterparts prior to making a site assignment, you will have an opportunity to provide input on your site preferences, including geographical location, distance from other Volunteers, and living conditions. Keep in mind that many factors influence the site selection process and that the Peace Corps cannot guarantee placement where you would ideally like to be. Most Volunteers live in small towns or in rural villages and usually are within two or three hours from the nearest fellow Volunteer. Some sites require a 10- to 12-hour drive from the capital.

How can my family contact me in an emergency?[edit]

The Peace Corps’ Office of Special Services provides assistance in handling emergencies affecting trainees and Volunteers or their families. Before leaving the United States, instruct your family to notify the Office of Special Services immediately if an emergency arises, such as a serious illness or death of a family member. During normal business hours, the number for the Office of Special Services is 800.424.8580, extension 1470. After normal business hours and on weekends and holidays, the Special Services duty officer can be reached at 202.638.2574. For nonemergency questions, your family can get information from your country desk staff at the Peace Corps by calling 800.424.8580, extensions, 2516, 2515, or 2525.

Can I call home from Ecuador?[edit]

Telephone service from Ecuador to the United States is generally quite good, and all of the major calling card services are available (i.e., AT&T, Sprint, and MCI). Most communities have a telephone office where you can call the United States collect or pay for the call on the spot. Very few Volunteers have phones in their homes, but many have neighbors with phones. (Note that it is not a good idea to use a neighbor’s phone with the promise to repay the phone owner later.) In larger towns internet cafes may have computers running Skype, so you may want to set up an account before coming.

Should I bring a cellular phone with me?[edit]

There are two major cellular phone companies in Ecuador that provide service in most of the large urban areas. While coverage is expanding, some Volunteer sites are in areas that do not have cellular service. All volunteers are required to have a cellular phone by Peace Corps Ecuador, and one will be provided during training. These phones are blocked for outgoing international calls, but can send text messages internationally. Keep in mind that cellphones are very much in demand and that theft is an issue for any Volunteer who has a cellphone.

Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?[edit]

Because it is a major tourist destination, Ecuador is well supplied with Internet cafes. In fact, there are so many of them in Quito that prices are quite low as a result of the intense competition. In addition to e-mail services, most Internet cafes offer phone call alternatives such as Net2Phone. Peace Corps/Ecuador neither recommends nor discourages bringing a computer, but it should be made clear that computers are easily stolen, so you should purchase personal property insurance if you decide to bring one.