Difference between pages "Packing list for Niger" and "Training in Panama"

From Peace Corps Wiki
(Difference between pages)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (1 revision imported)
 
m (1 revision imported)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Packing lists by country}}
+
{{Training_by_country}}
 +
An experienced staff of language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers and administrative support personnel will do their best to help you obtain the skills and knowledge necessary to have an enjoyable and productive two years of service as a Volunteer working in sustainable community development. They will design and conduct your training based on the specific projects you will be working on.
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Niger]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Niger.  
+
The 10-week training program will take place in small communities within an hour of Panama City. The average week will be packed into 48 hours, divided among development of language and technical skills; work orientation; and a segment called “common areas training,” which incorporates Panamanian culture and history, Volunteer life, personal safety, strategic planning, diversity and gender issues, and other topics related to Volunteer service.  
  
Many Volunteers end up wishing they had not brought so many clothes and toiletries and had concentrated instead on more personal items like music and , photos. However, we recommend that you avoid bringing anything you would be heartbroken to lose. Since there is a variety of jobs, each with different clothing requirements, you should consider your particular job in deciding what to bring. Health and education Volunteers have a greater need for professional-looking clothing than Volunteers who spend most of the time in the field, but all Volunteers should be neat and presentable.  Despite your worst fears, there is a cool season in Niger, when night temperatures become quite tolerable. Make sure your clothes are comfortable and durable, because they will take a beating during hand laundering. Keep in mind that it is relatively cheap and easy to have local tailors make great-looking traditional clothes (or copies of what you bring with you).  
+
While Peace Corps staff will help prepare you for service, the primary responsibility for becoming prepared resides with you. What you get out of training will depend primarily on your level of interest, enthusiasm, and participation. Come prepared to work hard.  
  
===General Clothing ===
+
The training staff eagerly awaits your arrival. The training director will contact you a few weeks prior to your departure to welcome you.
  
* Ten or so pairs of cotton underwear (boxer shorts, bras, etc.)
+
===Technical Training ===
* Three to five cotton T-shirts or tank tops (white not recommended)
 
* Three or four dress shirts
 
* One or two pairs of shorts for sports (but note that shorts are not normally worn by men or women in public)
 
* Two or three pairs of lightweight, loose-fitting cotton pants (tailors can duplicate them), the darker the better
 
* Two or three skirts for women (short skirts are inappropriate, and pockets are handy), below knee-length
 
* One sweater/sweatshirt (fleece)
 
* Three or five pairs of cotton socks (not white due to dust)
 
* One or two dressy outfits for official functions, e.g., good-looking dress or pants and a collared shirt (tie optional); do not bring anything that needs dry cleaning
 
* Belts (for when your clothes no longer fit you as you’ll probably lose weight)
 
* One or two brimmed hats or baseball caps
 
* One pair of jeans
 
* Swimsuit (sometimes a pool may be available)
 
  
===Shoes ===
+
Technical training will prepare you to work in Panama by building on the skills you already have and by helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Panamanian experts, representatives of Panamanian government agencies, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.
  
* One pair of sturdy sandals (e.g., Tevas, Birkenstocks, Chacos)
+
Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Panama and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Panamanian agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.  
* One pair of tennis shoes
 
* One pair of dress shoes for official functions (e.g., loafers or boat shoes for men and nice sandals for women)
 
 
  
Note: Sand, dust, rain, mud, and mildew are prevalent in Niger, so you may want to waterproof or otherwise protect much of your clothing and footwear.
+
===Language Training ===
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
+
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings.  Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.
  
* Thin, lightweight towel
+
Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further once you are at your site. Prior to being sworn-in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your service.
* Nail clippers and nail file
 
* Good pair of scissors (for hair cutting and other things)
 
* Two pairs of prescription glasses, if you wear them, and maybe one tinted pair.
 
* Three-month supply of any prescription medication you take (including birth control pills)
 
* Facial astringent/Face wipes (only if you prefer a specific brand)
 
* Special soaps and hair conditioners
 
* Two-month supply of shampoo for training
 
* Earplugs
 
* Toothpaste (only if you want your favorite brand, as it can be purchased in Niger)
 
* Two pairs of dark sunglasses (locally available sunglasses may not have UV protection) with a sturdy case
 
* Razor and blades (if you are partial to a certain type—you can purchase Bic razors locally)
 
  
===Kitchen ===
+
===Cross-Cultural Training ===
  
* Swiss army knife or Leatherman with can opener, bottle opener, blade, corkscrew
+
As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Panamanian host family. This experience will ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Panama. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.
* Sturdy water bottles (e.g., Nalgene) or canteens; two-quart size is ideal (small-mouth bottle easier to drink out of while traveling)
 
* Spices for cooking (e.g., cinnamon, oregano, basil, curry powder); most can be purchased in Niger 89
 
* Dry sauce mixes and instant drink mixes (a nice treat)
 
* Small and large plastic food storage bags
 
* Hard candies (note that chocolate melts, except for peanut M&M’s)
 
* Plastic containers (to protect a camera, tapes, and food)
 
* Dried fruit/granola/energy bars
 
* Jerky and/or tuna in a pouch
 
* Pudding
 
* Instant coffee
 
  
Note that Peace Corps/Niger has a cookbook specific to cooking in Niger. Also almost any food you want can be sent from home.  
+
Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.  
  
===Miscellaneous ===
+
===Health Training ===
  
* Sleeping bag (very light, highly compactable one is best)
+
During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. Topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Panama. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted illnesses (STIs) are also covered.  
* Pillow (optional)
 
* Combination lock (key locks available locally)
 
* Sturdy but inexpensive waterproof watch
 
* A sturdy day pack or fanny pack
 
* Batteries for anything electronic that you bring
 
* Solar battery recharger (note that it is usually easier to just buy new batteries and battery rechargers can get burnt out from the heat)
 
* Alarm clock
 
* Backpack—internal frame, well constructed (not too large)
 
* U.S. and world maps
 
* Paperbacks (there are many at the Peace Corps office, but recent releases make good additions)
 
* Games (e.g., deck of cards, chess, checkers, Othello, Frisbee, backgammon); many are available in the transit houses
 
* Photos of family, friends, and scenery (a great way to get to know people)
 
* Musical instruments
 
* Materials for hobbies and crafts (you will have more free time and fewer distractions)
 
* Calendars, holiday cards, thank-you notes, stationery, address book, good writing pens
 
* U.S. driver’s license (for travel outside Niger)
 
* Credit cards
 
* Padded envelopes for sending items home (like film)
 
* Twelve to 15 ID photos (for visas and other forms; photo-booth quality is OK, though this can be done in Niger )
 
* Duct tape
 
* Cassette recorder,Walkman, iPod, or MP3 player
 
* Your favorite music and blank cassettes (CDs will get scratched)  
 
* Shortwave radio (for BBC and Voice of America news broadcasts; inexpensive ones can be purchased in Niamey)
 
* Flashlight or headlamp and spare bulbs (also available in Niger)
 
* Self-adhesive U.S. stamps for mailing letters with people traveling to the United States
 
* Camera with a dustproof case (smaller is better as it is more inconspicuous), including digital equipment to download to a computer
 
* USB sticks
 
* Your favorite movie on DVD or VHS (You will have access to a TV sometimes) 91
 
  
===Don’t Bring ===
+
===Safety Training ===
  
* Heavy coats
+
During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
* Too many clothes
 
* Clothing that is torn, disheveled-looking, or has offensive wording
 
* Camouflage or military clothing
 
* Lots of cash
 
* Two-year supply of toiletries (basic products are available in Niger)
 
* Pots, pans, and kitchen utensils
 
* Anything cumbersome or unusual that could attract customs’ attention
 
* Over-the-counter medication (common OTC medication is provided by Peace Corps)
 
* Insect repellant (provided by Peace Corps/Niger)
 
* Sun block (provided by Peace Corps)
 
* Boots
 
* Rain gear
 
* Tampons
 
* Cellphones
 
  
 +
Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
  
[[Category:Niger]]
+
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During service, there are several training events.
 +
 
 +
* In-service training/project design and management: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for four to six months.
 +
* Sector workshops: Provides an opportunity each year for Volunteers to upgrade their technical skills. The length of the workshops varies from three to five days.
 +
* Regional training: Provides Volunteers with the opportunity to participate in training workshops with local agency counterparts at quarterly regional meetings.
 +
* Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.  The three-day conference occur three to four months before completion of service.
 +
 
 +
The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the
 +
 
 +
training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through
 +
 
 +
the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers  Peace Corps
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Panama]]
 +
[[Category:Training|Panama]]

Latest revision as of 12:15, 23 August 2016


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in Panama| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Panama| |4}}]]

An experienced staff of language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers and administrative support personnel will do their best to help you obtain the skills and knowledge necessary to have an enjoyable and productive two years of service as a Volunteer working in sustainable community development. They will design and conduct your training based on the specific projects you will be working on.

The 10-week training program will take place in small communities within an hour of Panama City. The average week will be packed into 48 hours, divided among development of language and technical skills; work orientation; and a segment called “common areas training,” which incorporates Panamanian culture and history, Volunteer life, personal safety, strategic planning, diversity and gender issues, and other topics related to Volunteer service.

While Peace Corps staff will help prepare you for service, the primary responsibility for becoming prepared resides with you. What you get out of training will depend primarily on your level of interest, enthusiasm, and participation. Come prepared to work hard.

The training staff eagerly awaits your arrival. The training director will contact you a few weeks prior to your departure to welcome you.

Technical Training

Technical training will prepare you to work in Panama by building on the skills you already have and by helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Panamanian experts, representatives of Panamanian government agencies, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Panama and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Panamanian agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.

Language Training

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.

Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further once you are at your site. Prior to being sworn-in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your service.

Cross-Cultural Training

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Panamanian host family. This experience will ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Panama. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.

Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.

Health Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. Topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Panama. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted illnesses (STIs) are also covered.

Safety Training

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During service, there are several training events.

  • In-service training/project design and management: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for four to six months.
  • Sector workshops: Provides an opportunity each year for Volunteers to upgrade their technical skills. The length of the workshops varies from three to five days.
  • Regional training: Provides Volunteers with the opportunity to participate in training workshops with local agency counterparts at quarterly regional meetings.
  • Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences. The three-day conference occur three to four months before completion of service.

The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the

training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through

the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers Peace Corps