Difference between pages "Tom Murphy" and "Training in Cameroon"

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{{volunteerinfobox
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{{Training_by_country}}===Overview of Pre-Service Training ===
|firstname=Tom
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|lastname=Murphy
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|yearservicestarted=1970
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|yearserviceended=1972
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|country=Paraguay
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|program=Community Development
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|assignment01=Gen. Construction
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}}
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Tom Murphy (born August 15, 1944) is a Democratic politician from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. From January 1994 until January 2006 he served as mayor of Pittsburgh. Murphy is currently the Senior Resident Fellow for Urban Development at the Urban Land Institute.
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Pre-service training lasts from 10 to 11 weeks, depending on the project, and follows a community-based training methodology. This means that you will live in a Cameroonian village or town with a small group of other trainees and periodically come together in a common location for sessions with the members of your training class. While in training, you will conduct individual research and have formal language classes. Although pre-service training can be stressful as you try to learn new skills in a different and often confusing environment, a highly experienced training staff is available to help you.  
  
The son of a steel worker, Murphy graduated from John Carroll University in Cleveland in 1967 and received a graduate degree from Hunter College in urban studies in 1973. From 1970 to 1972, Murphy and his wife Mona were in the Peace Corps in rural Paraguay, constructing sanitation facilities and an elementary school. After the Peace Corps, Murphy returned to Pittsburgh and became a neighborhood organizer for the North Side before entering local politics.
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====Technical Training====
  
Prior to his November 1993 election as mayor, Murphy served as a State Representative in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, representing Pittsburgh's North Side 20th Legislative District. In 1989 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic primary nomination for mayor.
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Technical training will prepare you to work in Cameroon by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Cameroonian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.  
  
Murphy was elected the mayor of Pittsburgh in 1993 and was sworn in during January of 1994.
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Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Cameroon and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Cameroonian agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated by the training staff throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.  
  
He is a somewhat controversial figure in Pittsburgh's recent history. As mayor, he initiated a public-partnership strategy that leveraged approximately $4.5 billion in economic development in Pittsburgh. Against overwhelming public opposition,[1][2][3][4] he secured $1 billion in funding for the development of Heinz Field, PNC Park, and a new convention center that was the largest certified green building in the United States. As mayor, he oversaw the transformation of more than 1,000 acres (4 km²) of blighted, abandoned industrial land into new commercial, residential, retail and public uses. He also lured, using public subsidies, both Lazarus and Lord's & Taylor department stores to the downtown section of the city. Both stores were monumental failures in Pittsburgh, each closing within a few years.[5][6] In addition, he oversaw the development of more than 25 miles of new riverfront trails and urban green space. Initiatives such as these drove the city to the brink of bankruptcy, resulting in it being declared a "distressed" city by the state.[7][8] To help recoup some of the city's losses during his tenure, Murphy made the controversial decision in 2003 to lay off a number of city employees, including police officers.[9][10] Some of these jobs were later saved by dramatically increasing the city's parking tax, making it the largest such tax in the country.[11][12]
 
  
Murphy's dealings with the Pittsburgh City Firefighters Union also had been questioned. Prior to the 2001 mayoral election, Murphy allegedly signed the firefighters to a new contract worth $10–12 million with a no-layoff clause in exchange for their vote.[13][14][15] He would go on to narrowly defeat future mayor Bob O'Connor. In 2004, Murphy announced that he would not run for re-election. In June 2006, Murphy entered into an agreement with Federal goverenment to avoid prosecution.[16][17]
 
  
While being considered a man with big ideas, Murphy's political skills were often questioned as he alienated Pittsburgh from the rest of the state.[18] His declining popularity after the city's budget crisis in 2003 resulted in various citizens pushing for his impeachment,[19][20] a move that would ultimately prove unsuccessful.
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====Language Training====
  
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As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings.  Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.  Experienced Cameroonian language instructors teach formal language classes five days a week in small groups of four to five people. French, pidgin, and other local languages are also introduced in the health, cultural, and technical components of training.
  
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Murphy_%28mayor%29 Wikipedia]
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Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service. You would be well-served to begin building your French skills now. Among the books Peace Corps/Cameroon uses is Essential French Grammar by Seymour Resnick (Dover, 1979).  
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====Cross-Cultural Training====
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As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Cameroonian host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Cameroon. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.
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Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.
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====Health Training====
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During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Cameroon. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.
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====Safety Training====
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During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
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Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
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In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
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* In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
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* Midterm conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
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* Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.
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The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
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[[Category:Cameroon]]
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[[Category:Training|Cameroon]]

Latest revision as of 14:00, 21 May 2014


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |2}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |3}} {{#explode:Training in Cameroon| |4}}]]

Overview of Pre-Service Training

Pre-service training lasts from 10 to 11 weeks, depending on the project, and follows a community-based training methodology. This means that you will live in a Cameroonian village or town with a small group of other trainees and periodically come together in a common location for sessions with the members of your training class. While in training, you will conduct individual research and have formal language classes. Although pre-service training can be stressful as you try to learn new skills in a different and often confusing environment, a highly experienced training staff is available to help you.

Technical Training[edit]

Technical training will prepare you to work in Cameroon by building on the skills you already have and helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. Peace Corps staff, Cameroonian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.

Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Cameroon and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Cameroonian agencies and organizations that invited the Peace Corps to assist them. You will be supported and evaluated by the training staff throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you need to undertake your project activities and be a productive member of your community.


Language Training[edit]

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job performance, they help you integrate into your community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer. Experienced Cameroonian language instructors teach formal language classes five days a week in small groups of four to five people. French, pidgin, and other local languages are also introduced in the health, cultural, and technical components of training.

Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further on your own. Prior to being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service. You would be well-served to begin building your French skills now. Among the books Peace Corps/Cameroon uses is Essential French Grammar by Seymour Resnick (Dover, 1979).

Cross-Cultural Training[edit]

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Cameroonian host family. This experience is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Cameroon. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.

Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, and political structures.

Health Training[edit]

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Cameroon. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.

Safety Training[edit]

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces your risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:

  • In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
  • Midterm conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
  • Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.

The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.